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Full text of "Antioch News 11/06/1998"

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^tfSSS** — 72 Pages FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 6 1Q9 B a. I , ^.i '^ , 



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Main Street 

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expanded patron services 



J PATCHY * 
Staff Reporter^ 



pleased? v -- >; . ■ 8,^ j or future growth and bufldlrig '■' "We have to resoect the Deoole 

On Tuesday, Wov. 3, therewere; thdrlnterest purehase.-Sc^SA^ ^V u» u ■■',;. ; uW - : ' 

Tuesday .-for- additional llbraiy rate should be IncSasS to ^S^S^S^^iSS ^^SP^ *W „ a 1 ! ote £ *» national ; benefit The Antioch 

They said "yes'' for new comput- tioa ■ There were 2,582 people added to the M^Sfrf^»i«t ^55 r '? t ^ rI f?T a - : ^ r.--^f»J^i^MOdi^Jp»Kwlt 

eraandotherpationservices. r - 47.89 peix»nt,whbSd no v^ ^ev ^S^^^ ; ^^^ 

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to contmue Bist 62 



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Will resign Antioch Township post; 
heads to Springfield 




* 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

&$ , ^Tlmpthy " H. • Osmond has 
promise to keep. . ■-- i ..;,":. ' 

During the course' of ^ Tuesday^ 
17,021 voters selected .the Antioch 
Township Supervisor as their choice 
to represent them" as ffulnw State' 
Representative for District 6l . 
■£%$&. -^FoPrSbme loca^pollticalUeadeTS^'' 
' Osmbnri^ '-'repre^ij^tHe^ntinuecl'' 
premise' ' of ^accessibility' for the 
district and the people,;, yj. 

For Timy.Osmon'iiSdie victory 
represents ''thle^bppbr^urUty to 'take 
his strong spiririof community 
service "to; another level of govern- 
ment service. 

Republican Tim Osmond was 
elected District 62 Representative 
with 64.82 percent of the vote, over 




Democrat Michael. I, Deimler. 
Deimler obtained 9,237 votes, 35:18 
percent, in his first effort fordlstrict^' 
elective office; \ ^- ". ;. - 

"I prorr^.tb.vrork hard, : to bprf- 
accessible^ahd do rny best job for the . v 
districtj^Oambhd saldas results of 
,his ^yictbry became s Increasingly 
apparent "I want to thank all of the. 
citizens that helped." . 
^^-"l-V^.resigii^rn^lhe.^tiodi^, 
Township) Supervisor pbsitibn^'lie*? 1 " 
said. "I promised I would do that" :.'. 

"I'll fight as hard as I can to keep 
the Kiley. Center open," he also said 

Two politicians who have 
worked with Osmond for many years 
expressed strong expectations that 
he will continue traditions of district 
accessibility. ■> 

Tim is very available and will sit 
down with people," said Antioch 
Township Trustee Steve Smouse, 
"He's going to be very accessible." 

Antioch Mayor Marilyn Shlne- 
flug said, "fust as Bob Churchill was. 
readily available and Interested in 
local needs, I would expect Tim 
Osmond, as representative, to 
continue the same type of positive 

Mn ^vvVre eoimftb eet good reore- Tim OsmoridVat his headquarters at Mldlane Country Club In Wadswortii; vyaits for results to ^come 
goug xp gei goou p [n .supporters watched returns for the race for the 62nd- District Tuesday night against Michael 
Please see OSMOND tA3 Deimler.— Photo by Sancfy Bressner 



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Grass Lake now able to upgrade 




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Voters approve debt service 
extension referendum; money will 
fund school improvements 




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By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

■; Grass Lake School District 36 
voted to gfve itself the opportunity to 
improve the school by passing a debt 
service extension base referendum. 

School officials now may 
propose a bond issue to raise funds to 
build a cafeteria and multi-purpose 
room. 

: "We're goingto ratify (the results) 
next Tuesday," said District Superin- 
tendent Jim Beveridge. The Nov. 10 
school bbard meeting will be a 



special meeting to go over election 
results. 

A resolution to issue. bonds will 
come .at the. next regular board 
meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 7 
p.nx 

Voters approved (he referendum 
to establish a debt service extension 
base by 79 votes. There were 458 
"yes" votes, 54,72 percent, and 379 
"no" votes, 45.28 percent The debt 
service extension base allows District 
36 officials to propose bond issues. 
The. bond issues are subject to a 
public hearing process. 



A new cafeteria building and 
multi-purpose room on the north 
side Of the existing building Is 
proposed as the first Improvement 
for the school, according to 
Beveridge. 

The cafeteria will eliminate 
serving lunch on the stage area of 
the gymnasium. The multi- 
purpose room will allow instruc- 
tion and storage of educational 
materials. 

"We want to get 110 percent 
use out of that room," said 
Beveridge. 

"I hope to get started this 
summer," Beveridge said of tentative 
construction plans. 

Passage of the referendum has 
been a long process for people in the 
district who support school improve- 
ment ' ' 

"We've been two years working 






on it," he said. "We're the first in Lake 
County to do this. We maybe the first 
to Illinois to do this." 

Approval of a debt service exten- 
sion base, according district officials, 
will allow the possibility of bond 
Issues that create a $95,000 annual 
bond 'arid 1 Interest Meyy£ Such an 
amount increases taxes by 17 cents 
per $100 of assessed valuation. 

"For the owner of a $150,000 
home, a (17 cent) tax- rate Increase 
would mean \ an; .approximate 
increase in taxes of (22 cents) per day 
or $80 annually, " according to school 
officials. - r ■_ 

Opportunities -for Grass Lake 
School officials to undertake school 
safety and fire prevention measures, 
building additions, capital projects, 
and energy management were not 
possible without passage of a debt 
service extension base. V 



For home delivery, call (847) 740-4035; For ads, call (847) 223-8161 



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A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



November 6; 1998 . 




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No tricks,. 

Christina Gasperini, 2, Is In amazement as she trick-or-treats in 
her clown costume In Antioch Saturday.— Photo by Sandy Bress- 



ner 



FR0MPAGEA1 



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OSMOND: Wins race 



sentation from Tim," said Smouse. 
"He's been so active on the (town- 
ship) board." 

"He's made a lot of contacts In the 
eastern area (of the district)," said 
Smouse. Osmond works well with the 
township base of people and contacts, 
and that will help as a representative, 
according to Smouse. 

Osmond said, "I'll be up here 
more than I'll be down in Springfield." 
The current district office will remain 
where it is at 976 Hillside Avenue. 

"1 plan to explore the possibility of 
opening up an office on the eastern 
side of the district," he said. 

In addition, he expects to contin- 
ue the existing spirit of close coopera- 
tion with other state legislators, such 
as Senator Adeline Geo-Karis and 
Representative Mark Beaubien Jr. 

People who have worked closely 
with him in the past will continue to 
do so. "Linda Pedersen is going to be 



my legislative aide," he said. "Bill 
Snod grass will continue to be a con- 
sultant on educational Issues." 

Pedersen is a long-time commu- 
nity volunteer and civic leader. She is 
presently President of the tenth dis- 
trict of the Illinois General Federation 
ofWomen's dubs. Pedersen is former 
President of the Antioch Rotary Club. 

Snodgrass was Superintendent of 
Schools in North Chicago. He serves 
as a legislative aide to District 62 Rep- 
resentative Robert Churchill on senior 
citizen issues and education. 

Osmond expects to work with An- 
tioch Township trustees until early 
1999. He willbe workingwith them on 
the new budget When he resigns, 
township trustees will select a new su- 
pervisor to replace Osmond and ap- 
point a new member to serve two 
years until the next election. At that 
time, the appointee may choose to 
run as a candidate for the office. 



Honoring committment 

Lake VI la Township Uon's Club President Merilee Miller presents an award to State Representative 
5? d u ^ k S w,la Township Uons Club Member Bob Churchill. He received the award from the Uon's 

PS? °u i^^? 1 ^ 6 ? 1 to !? curo S ^&°fi^6.0rjQ!br the development of Millennium Park in 

Undenhurst. , Photo by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom, 




CORRECTION 



The date for the Laura Ingalls 
Wilder program at the Antioch Pub- 
lic Library District was incorrectly 
reported in the Antioch News in the 



Friday, Oct. 23 edition. The pro- 
gram will be on Saturday, Nov. 7 at 
2 p.m. in the meeting room at the li- 
brary. 



By KENNETH PAFCHEN;;.- 
Staff Reporter . - ; -,' 

Footlights, steps Into the lime- 
light, tonight, with many highlights 
to delight 

"So far, it's going very well," said 
Linda Pedersen of the general orga- 
nizing committee. There is some- 
thing new, and some rooms are vari- 
ations and updates on past offerings. 

This 17th anniversary celebra- 
tion known as Footlights will begin 
tonight, Friday, Nov. 6 and continue 
tomorrow night, Nov. 7. It will also 
unfold next weekend, Saturday and 
Sunday, Nov. 13 and 14. Doors open 
at 6 p.m. 

it takes place at St Peter School 
behind the church at 557 Lake Street 
There is close-by parking and shuttle 
bus service available. 

The Footlights Committee en- 
courages people to consider attend- 
ing on Friday evening when it is less 
crowded. 



•«r ■■■• * ,. ■ 

its* offers full; course 



meals, snacks, drinks of all kinds, 
music of all styles^— well; maybe 
most of the. commonly accepted 
styles in Antioch by about 2,800 peo- 
ple between the age. of 21 and 106 — 
comedy, pathos, dessert, gambling, 
and PM&L theater magic. 

"There are some new people in 
Lip Sync," shesaid. There is new mu- 
sic and new acts for one of the most 
popular rooms in Footlights, "The 
Stars of lip Sync." 

There is an improvisational 
comedy group— 3Brothers. "We 
haven't had that type of entertain- 
ment before," said Pedersen. "That is 
something new we're trying." 

"The Alley" is the venue for the 
3Brothers, 

Ed Franks will present a program 
of Frank Sinatra in the "TwoCan 
Dans" room. 

"He will be doing his own show," 
said Pedersen. 

Franks will alternate with the 



... ■■ ^ .iz ■'•■■?. ■''ffit 1 ^ 
' retm^nck^JpTesent£tlons:^of J ,"the 
Michael Lescher Band and Friends, ' 
If that Is not dose enough to Las 
Vegas for residents, they can hit the 
top floor casino, "Black Jack and Di- 
amondjim's." ■/ ..:•;'■'■ ; 

"They've got blackjack, roulette, 
poker, and- craps, "said Pedersen. 
They also have bang, a bar, and a 
casino license from the State of Illi- 
nois titled 0CG17. It'ls the oldest es- 
tablished casino in Antioch, accord- 
ing to Footlights, and it is a very pop- 
ular place to make donations. 

Tickets are available at the door. 

"Advanced ticket sales are 
cheaper," Pedersen said. 

Tickets are available at State 
Bank of The Lakes, First National 
Bank-Employee Owned, First Na- 
tional Bank of Chicago, St. Peter 
Church Rectory, American Family 
Insurance, and Realty World-Tiffany. 

Admission is restricted to people 
21 years old and older. Proceeds 
benefit St. Peter Parish. 



Women's Club celebrates century of service 



Antioch News 



Founded 1886 



A Lakeland Newspaper 

Mamtw of Binort Preu AtMO. 

Lock for uaonthe Internet at 
WWW.LPNEWS.COM 



Vol.113 NO. 45 

(USPS 027-000) Edsorf-omc* 

30 South Whitney St.. Grayslake, IL 60030 
(847) 223-8181 

Offc» of Putttaaat 30 Baulh W\*r*f SI, OfiyiUti J L BOOM. Plxio* (M 7)223-8191. 

PUHWMd w»«kff, fwtodlcai mil DMtMl paid *i QrtyiWa, IL BOOM 

HSTM Ortwiy fUMc 12* -60 p« y»« In Uk*. Coo*. K«x»h* «xJ MeH«vy CewrtJ** 

HMHilln *4O,00 fm ytmi by mil ptfrj In advanc*. 

Pottmustc S«j mmkia tfnngN to Antioch Nww, 30 SouOi Whan** sw*t P.O. to 2^. Or^ttk*. tent* eoo». 



WHWMH.SCHROEDER 

Publisher 
KAREN OTOOLE 

Ci-eoiaflpn Mgr. 

BOBULMER 
Oaflty Advening Ugr. 

MAUREEN COMBS 

Ctessfltod/WwtkiivMffr. 



M.R.SCHROEDER 

Founder-1 004-1 886 



Vi 



WILLIAM M.SCHROEDER 

President 

MIMIKOOB 

CORKEYGROSS 

PuMcFlttitlonaMinaQor 

VJSSifiRHONDA HETRICK BURKE 



NEAL TUCKER 



AUtarrtNOiNG Managing tator 



The General Federation of 
Women's Clubs, Illinois 
10th District held their 
100th birthday party 
Wednesday, Oct 28 at the Midland 
Country Club. 

It included a remarkable presen- 
tation by Jack! e Pierce. 

First, Mayor Chuck Paxfton of 
Zion sent over a proclamation of 
recognition. Senator Adeline Geo- 
Karis sent a proclamation from the 
90th General Assembly of the State 
of Illinois recognizing the federa- 
tion's "outstanding efforts of volun- 
teering and service to the communi- 
ty." Jtan Edgar wrote a letter of 
recognition for the anniversary and 
the years of service. '» 

Second, "Fashions by RorT pre- 
sented a program called Transfor- 
mations'' with a mixture of clothing 
styles and jewelry for all tastes. Fed- 
eration member Mabel Lou Weber 
modeled a three-piece Interlocked- 
knit suit with dramatic appliques 




OUR 
TOWN 

Ken Patchen 



that was sensational. 

Third, there was a raffle with, lit- 
erally, a hundred items in it It was 
100 wrapped boxes with something 
inside that equaled one hundred- 
such as sheet of 100 stamps, or en- 
velopes. The First National Bank- 
Employee Owned stuffed a $100 bill 
into one of the boxes. That works 
nicely. Sharon Oldenburger had 
the idea for the raffle. ' 

The final feature was Jackie 
Pierce's presentation of "A Ladies 
Tea Party." She started with the his- 
tory of tea to the present era. Pierce 
defined some character traits, such 
as equality and liberty, and proceed- 



ed to tell five stories of women to il- 
lustrate each of the traits. 

It was professional speech- 
making and storytelling all the 
way through. No one should ever 
miss the opportunity to hear her 
give that speech. Would anyone 
ever disagree with one of her final 
statements: "It is the General Fed- 
eration ofWomen's Clubs that has 
allowed us to enhance the virtues 
of womanhood " 

Tenth District President Linda 
Pedersen spoke last She said that 
without the hard work and dedica- 
tion of women in their communities, 
they would not be there. "My hat's 
off to you." 

Happy 100th Birthday. 



If you have interesting informa- 
tion or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town" call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at 223-8161, ext 131 or 
e-mail, edit @lndxom." 





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PEDIATRICS 



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Dr. Michael Bauer 



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Or. Karen Burton 



Dr. Rcnuka Ocsal 






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Dr. Wendy H Dim art 



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Or. Jeffrey Fireman 



Dr. Mclanlc Goodcll 



Dr. Araccll Hanklns 



Dr. Ronald Kallen j 



low is prime time to pick a primary care' 

physician who's committed to helping 

you achieve a higher level of health. 

And wc have so many caring ones to pick from! 

Each of our highly skilled and experienced 

doctors is dedicated to working with 

you as an individual 

teicli is backed by the comprehensive 

senices of Like Forest Hospital. 

Our Stren^ 
In Primary 
Care Is 



fo|Ma'pftMryea«.t»- ! i-. - •:;,:, Oi&pfMc 



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INTERNAL MEDICINE 



Dr. Lisa Abriims 



V^ir. 



Dr. Jerome Kallmnn 



Dr. Alexander Kamlnsky 



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Dr. T. Randal] Klnsetla «£-:! Dr. Janice Krakora-Looby 



Root 
Of Good 

Health. 



Dr. Scoll RraunliLli ' I 

- -r *t- -/ --rrr •* * Dr. Jennifer Cautrto •* 

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Dr. Hoscp Ocyrmenjlan .' . / ....„_, -, 

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Dr. Pamela Fcnncw.ild g^-y/J^^^gjffi 

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Dr. Michael Franks ■ . — - •■ 



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Dr. Jclfrcy Garland 



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a doctor, 

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Ourpnyskidmfat&B 
affiliated, with some 

.ofihe.dfea&most 
wetl-kng^^rimdry , 

; caKgr6ups,,tfyese yS 
boa^drceriifi^^^y 
boardTfjudlified. 
internists, family •■'-;■/ 
practitioners and 
pediatricians ; 

;. participate in the 
health plamlisted 
below. To find out 

y whether a doctor 
is affiliated with a,., 
particular plan t 
check with your 
doctor's office or 
insurance provider. 

• Aetna US Healthcare 

• Beech Street Corporation 
■ • Blue Cress/Blue Shield 

■ Blue Cross PPO 

• Community Blue PPO 

• Glue Choice (MCKP) POS 
•HMO Illinois 

• CAPP Care, Inc. 

• CCH/MeoMew Services, Inc. 

• CHAMPUSffHICARE 

• Cherry Electrtcai Products 

• CIGNA Healthcare of Illinois 

• First HeaJlh/Afforaable 

• HeallhcareAa Rnest Network (HFN| 

• Healthcare Compare Corporation 

• Hearth Direct, Inc. 

■ Health Dynamics, inc. 

• Health Marketing, Inc. (HMI) 

i 5 • Health Payors OrtjariiiaUon ;-.; 
^>'Hea«iStar? ; rv v * ,XT -'^ 

• Health Plan Management 
■• Hewitt Associates Managed 

Indemnity 

• Humana Health Care Plans 

■ IMC Holdings {Inuupa Mfg.) 

• Lake County Employees 

• LaborCare 

• Managed Care, Inc. 

• MulliPlan of Illinois, Inc. 

• NYLCare ot Illinois 

• One Health Plan of Illinois 

• Oxford/Compass Health Care Plans 

• Preferred Health Network (PHN). 
(formerly Midwest Business 
Medical Association) 

• Preferred Plan, Inc. 

• Principal Healthcare of llllnois/FHP 
of Illinois 

• Private Healthcare Systems, Inc. 
(PHCS) 

• Rush-Prudential Health Plans 

• SOLO Cup Company 

• State of Illinois Employee Plan 

• US Managed Care Organization 

• United Healthcare ol Illinois 

• United Choice PPO 

• UHCI Plus (tormefty MetraHealth) 

• UHCI Prentice (formerly Metre HMO) 

• UHCI HMO {formerly Chicago HMO) 

• UHCI Open Access 

• Wellmark/Health Network 



Visit our website at: 
www.laketoresthDspltal.com 



Lake Forest Hospital 



Caring for the Quality of Your Life 

/|\TJT TCl-J A member or ihe 

Vl/ iMJOn RUSH Syilem for Health. 



SM 



November 6, 1998 




POLICE & FIRE 




Lakeland Newspapers/ 




Cause and effect 



1 1, 






Pharmacist Joseph Dillman explains the effects of tiriigs oh athletes and athletic performance to athletes 
and parents Monday evening at Antioch Community High School.— Photo by Sandy Bmssner 



Veterans Day services set 



Antioch Veterans of Foreign 
Wars and the Antioch American 
Legion Post will' hold remem- 
brance services for soldiers on 
Wednesday, Nov. 11 at 11 a.m. 

The public is encouraged to 
attend. 



The service will be at Hillside 
Cemetery at Route 173 and Route 

59. . -'. '. : . .-.:■* i 

• Services' will be held at the 
VFW Post "'at 75; North Avenue If 
weather does no t permit grave- 
side ceremonies: ■'-.' '-:--■ 



Township offers info 

Information on Kid Care Health 
Insurance for Illinois Children Is aval- 
able at the Antioch Township Hall/ ; 
..-., ^These are 1'the latest brochures 
about tills new program," said Tim- 
othy H. O smond, Township Supervi - 
sor. "We have applications and can 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter .: 





■iii. 

' : ■ , 



show people how to get details.' 







v rAndoch Polfce officers prevent- 
ed one burglary in progress; and 
solved 22 others in separate caies in • r 
October Involving automobiles, 

At 3:30/ am; Sgtv-: Craig -?•> 
Somerville found Rodney J. 'Plasky, / 
30, of Chicago, crouched behind a 
1990Chevrotet Astro Mini-van at the 
Lake Animal Clinic on Route 173 on 
Sunday, Oct 18. ,,; 

Plasky had a shopping list with 

him..;.';' 1 ' ";/,'..■ ■■.' 

On routine patrol, (Somerville) 
saw ayan parked there," said Lt Ron 
Roth of the Antioch Police Depart-: 
merit It was unusual to see a van . 
there, and it had no front license 
plate. While investigating the situa- 
tion, Somerville found Plasky 
crouched behind the van. . 

Somerville followed a trail 
through a vacantiot to Raymond 
Chevrolet & Oldsmobile, Inc., 120 
West Route 173. He discovered that 
seven new Blazer spare tires and 
wheels had been removed from ve- 
hicles in a pouring rain. 

Somerville also determined that 
tires had been removed from vans at 
LybhsrRyanForf-Imcoln-Mercuiy, . r 
Inc., at 104 West Route 173. 1 

"(Plasky) had a shopping list of 
size and type of tire he was going to ': 
" said Roth. The tires matched 
and the 16 tires are worth 
about $3,000.'; _<:).• ,r: y , - ; ' ';"^:- 

;Plasky : \vas .charged with : two 
couhte bf-theft over, $300. He-was 
also charged with having a stolen ve- 
hicle, possession of burglary tools, - 
and possession of hypodermic nee- ' 
- dies. Also, in the van, there ' wasi a 
briefcase that had .been reported 
stolen from a valet parking garage In ' 



■|\steal,"B8 
n U the list; 
r.- 3 about $3 



Chicago six hours earlier. 

"He's possibly Involved In other C 
work," said RoUl The confiscated 
tools are being checked b determine 
If they were used in other thefts in 
southern Lake County. 

;; Plasky was taken to the Lake 
County jail on Monday, Oct 19 on a 
bond of $50,000. ; 

; ■ In the. second case, Detectives ' 
James Ruth and Ron Naumah; with 
"assistants from the like County ■ 
Sheriffs Office, broke a burglary case 
tbjaUqgplvttl three people and 22 ve- 
: hldes^c^ach<if-UTfiJ^ree^people 
was involved In all 22 fcddents.^* v - 
■ "Our detectives spent a great 
deal of effort to put an end to this," 
said Roth. "Oyer the summer we had 
a string of car burglaries." 

The case was solved in mid-Oc- 
tober. 

Charged with burglary to a mo- 
tor vehicle were Randy M. Oultsch, 
18, and Brock C. Johnson, 17, both 
of Antioch Township, and Eric R. 
Brown, 18, of Lindenhurst. The 
Lake County State's Attorney will 
review the case to consider addi- 
tional charges. All three individu- 
als were taken to the Lake Coun- 
ty Jail. 

— The burglaries to vehicles ; main- 
ly were committed in apartment 
complexes, according to Roth. The : 
. target areas vvere Oakridge /VDlage [ 
:.-;Apaitme.nb,;'Anltk;Tertace:Apaxt-'.j 
: ments, Sequolt Apartments, and Jo^; r . 
hahrtaCourt.. " -v;- :V *' 

"The detectives are in the 
process of trying to recover some of 
the stolen property,"^ said : Roth. 
' Owners are to be notified ,'■ .-'■ ; V 

Roth said, These detectives re- 
sorted to good old-fashioned police 
work ori several leads. It Involved a 
lot of man-hours." 



POLICE BEAT 

Persons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. 



UNDENHURST 



Possession of 
Paraphernalia, cannabis 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Todd A. Talbot, 23, of 
Vernon Hills, on Monday, Oct. 
26, at 9:37 p.m. on Route 45 at 
Farmington Greens in a 1989 
Chevrolet Silverado pick-up 
truck. He was charged with 
speeding, suspended registra- 
tion, no insurance, driving while 
his license is suspended, and 
possession of drug paraphernalia 
Talbot was released on bond pend- 
ing a court date of Wednesday, Dec. 
2 at 10:30 a.m. in Grayslake. 

A passenger in his vehicle, 
Christopher L Nystrom, 26, of 
Round Lake Beach, was charged 
with possession of paraphernalia 
and possession of cannabis. He was 
released on bond pending a court 
date ofWednesday, Dec 2 at 10:30 
a.m. In Grayslake. "j. 

Warrant Arrests 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Adam J. Diaz, 19, of 
Waukegan, on Tuesday, Oct. 27 at 
4:51 p.m. traveling east bound on 
Grand Avenue at Sand Lake Road in 
a blue 1985 Chevrolet Caprice. He 
- was charged with not having proof 
of insurance and was arrested on an 
outstanding warrant He was given 
a court date for Wednesday, Dec. 2 
in Grayslake and taken to die Lake 
County Jail on the warrant. 



Lindenhurst Police Officers also 
stopped Michael J. Nicolay, 22, of 
Lindenhurst, on Saturday, Oct. 31 at 
12:42 p.m. He was charged with 
public intoxication. He declined the 
offer to take a Breathalyzer test 
Nicolay was released on bond 
pending a court date ofWednesday, 
Dec. 2 at 9 am. hi Grayslake. He 
was found to be wanted on a war- 
rant issued by (he Chicago Police 
Department Nicolay was turned 
over to the Lake County Jail. 

Residential burglary 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Daniel R. McNichols, 17, of 
Lindenhurst, on Wednesday, Oct 
28 at 12:49 am. in the 100 block of 
South BeckRaac}. He was charged 
with residential burglary. He agreed 
to take a breathalyzer test (0.03). 
McNichols was taken to the Lake 
County Jail. 

Zero Tolerance 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Robert John York, 19, of 
Zion, on Sunday, Nov. 1 at 12:32 
am. traveling north bound on Beck 
Road north of Rolling Ridge in a 
brown 1987 Pontiac He was 
charged with speeding, having a 
suspended driver's license, zero tol- 
erance, and being a minor consum- 
ing alcohol. He declined the offer to 
take a breathalyzer test York was 
released an bond pending a court 
date on Wednesday, Dec. 2 at 1:30 
p.m. in Grayslake. 



'£& 






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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



^™^^TT... ..... -./.-■■ f; " ■ .,J.v.-.-,-.- ■V ■•-..*.-■■■;. 

' J.' . , 

COMMUNITY ■■:•■■■■ No wrieri!>^W8, 



■Ndi 




Making a difference 

As part of a dual program recognizing Red Ribbon Week and Make A difference Day, students at 
W.C. Petty School collected food and supplies for homeless men who live at the PADS Help Tran- 
sitional Program in North Chicago. Fifth grade students who participated include: Front row, from 
left to right, Zach Tognarelli, Erica Knisely, Tommy Madden, Dennis Markasovic, Phillip Ponsonby, 
and Jared Brussaty. Middle row: Juiie Latham, Sam Hachmeister, Luke Holm, Kendall Jerrina, Aman- 
da Davidson and Kim Leonard. Back row: Gina Diorio, Cody Kidwell, Dan Roche, Katy Komarchuk, 
Holly Roberts, Angie Axton, and Brianna Emerson. Photo by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom. 



FUND-RAISING GUIDE 

On-going: A.LL Parent Net- 
work selling personalized bricks 
for ACHS memorial wall in new 
building. Bricks S30, Plaque $60 
donations. Information: Karen 
Powell, 847-395-6600. 

Ongoing: Aniioch Junior 
Woman's Club is selling Entertain- 



ment coupon books for $35. Infor- 
mation; Jodi Eckert, 847-395-4282. 

Nov. 8, "The Game of Antioch" 
on sale in downtown stores, $16.95, 
sold by Antioch Lions Club. More 
information from Adam Za- 
kroczymski, B47-838-1790. 

Nov. to Nov. 15, Magazine, 
Nuts, Chocolate product sales, 
Girl Scout Troops of the Illinois 



Crossroads Council. 

Nov. 7, 9 am to 4 p.m., Holiday 
Craft Show fund-raiser, Ladies Auxil- 
iary of Antioch Veterans of Foreign 
Wars, VFW Hall, Information: 
Dorothee Himber, 847-395-6934. 

Nov. 13, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Antioch 
Senior Center Annual Bazaar rum- 
mage, bake sale, and raffle. Infor- 
mation: Paul Howard, 395-7120. 



YOU'RE READING 
A WINNER! 



Lakeland 

P;U B,L I S H„E.*R|§^ 



And the 
judges agree 

This year, at the Illinois Press Association Awards, 

Lakeland Newspapers brought back an arm load of honors- 11 in all — 

which is just one more accolade that tells us 

you are reading a quality product each week. 

Quotes from Best of the Press: 




NEWSPAPER DESIGN 

FIRST PLACE: 



NEWS STORY 

FIRST PLACE: 



LIFESTYLE SECTION 

first place: 



■^■yrvV'ilJj>Kw 




£8$B£ St, -T 



"Great layout, 
excellent choice 
of body copy and 
headline fonts. 
Clean appear- 
ance, good use of 
color overall. Ads 
offer a variety of 
typography and 
art styles. Local news attractively 
packaged and emphasized made 
this entry stand out among the 
competition. Congratulations to a 
staff who obviously cares about the 
community!'' 

THIRD PLACE; 

• Editorial Cartoon -—Tbm Beck 

• Apical Care/B nsiness Reporting— 

Raspberry preserves, Elizabeth Eaken 

• Original Column— life's a Bear, 

Donna Abear 






s. 




LCHS English 

teacher fired. 

Jason J. King, 

Leon Filas 

"Well-written, 
tells a compelling 
story. Good use 
of the teachers 

letter attempting to explain himself. 

Great job on a sensitive topic that 

must nave had everyone in the 

community talking.'' 



S^ 






>e 



Lakelife 
Section 

"Very high 
quality; design 
is well thought 
out and clean. 
Listings are 
broken up by 

mini-stories, good features and 

columns.'' 




HONORABLE MENTION: 



• Feature Story— Executive 

Orders, Leon Filas 

• Feature Photography— Kelly 
Argis scoffs at a kiss., ., Sandy 

Bressner 

• Sports Story— Mr 900, Brendan 

O'Neill 



> Sports Column— In the 

Trenches, Brendan O'Neill, 

Leon Filas 
• Agriculture/Business 

Reporting— Farm home 
beats reaper, Kenneth Patchen 





.'■■■' ■: • 




for 




game 







-. - *'■ ..." ■ -..'-'" ' \' VY. ?■' 

Annual auction, dinner Nov. :JS 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch Lions Club will host a 
wild game dinner and auction Nov. 
18 at Maravela's in Fox Lake. 

The vintage social hour will start 
at 630 , followed by the Royal Dinner 
at 7:30 p.m., and auction and raffle 
entertainment. 

There will be an egg toss. 

"We will be serving bear, elk, 
venison, ostrich, buffalo, raccoon, 
muskrat, and beaver," said Claude 
LeMere, Lions club publicity manag- 
er for the event. "Duck, geese, and 
wild turkey are some of the other 
game dishes." 

"Among the honored guests in- 
vited is Brent Manning, head of the 
Illinois Department of Natural Re- 
sources," said LeMere. 

Tickets will be available at the 
Antioch Chamber of Commerce and 
Industry, First National Bank — Em- 
ployee Owned, First National Bank 
of Chicago, State Bank of The Lakes, 
and from Antioch Lions Club mem- 
bers. 

"Capacity for the dinner is 425, 
so get your tickets early," said 
LeMere. 

"The purpose of this dinner is to 
enjoy the camaraderie of the Lions 
club, their friends and guests, par- 
take in an absolutely delicious wild 
game feast, and to raise funds for the 
William E. Brook Memorial Wetland 
Sanctuary and Entertainment Cen- 
ter," said LeMere. 

"There will be a live auction by 
Robert Diemer," said LeMere. "He is 
one of the most entertaining auc- 
tioneers you will ever enjoy." 

The live auction will feature 
many special items. 

"There will be several types of 



guris auctioned off and beautiful 
prints," said LeMere: "A Remington 
306 High Powered Rifle" with scope 
was donated by George LeMere for 
the auction." , ■■■ !-yv' .; )} •[;■-'■ 

A gift basket of liquors has been 
donated. 

"There will be door prize? for 
everyone. There will be a50-50 raffJe, 
and there'll be an egg toss," he said. 

" (The egg toss is) : a game of 
chance featuring 144 eggs, two 
dozen of which will be hard boiled," 
said LeMere. "We are carefully se- 
lecting, and putting great thought 
Into who shall be the recipient of the 
egg toss," . '" • 

Eggs will be $10 apiece. "Buy an 
egg," said LeMere. 

"Anyone who gets a hard boiled 
egg will get a ticket that goes into a 
drawing for a grand prize." 

Donations for the auction may 
be left at the Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry office in the Communi- 
ty Building, 884 Main Street, In 
downtown Antioch. 

Corporate tables for the dinner 
and auction are available for $300. 

The Antioch Lions Club has 
committed Itself to a $20,000 dona- 
tion for the William E Brook Memo- 
rial by the end of 1999. To raise the 
funds, Lions have held raffles and 
dinners, and have sold The Game of 
Antioch board game. The wild game 
dinner is part of their fund-raising ef- 
forts. 

The Lions have formed a wild 
game dinner committee to manage 
the event. The general dinner orga- 
nization leaders are Dan Dugenske, 
Jim Fields, Claude LeMere, and Tom 
Haley. 

i Adam Zakroczymskl Jr. will work 
with LeMere on publicity, and will 
take care of special menu items. 



Ju 
tfo 
Ht 

m 

ptl 

ar 
51 
M 




Do you make any excuse to meet away from your office? 




Fox Lake's beautiful new water view 
offices are the alternative! Each office 

has a great view of Ptstakee Lake. 

Close to restaurants, trains and stores! 

Introductory prices starting at 

$275/month. 



Call 847-587-1615 



Help Others la November With Our 
"Food For The Hungry Campaign" 

New Patients Bring In 5 Cans Of Food And Receive 




'Headaches 

* Neck Pain 

* Mid-Back Pain 

* Sport Injuries 



If any of these symptoms sound 
familiar, let us help you: 

* Auto or Work Related 
Injuries 

* Lower Back Pain or 
Stiffness 

* Numbness or Pain D|, « Scon °- n,,Ber 
in Anns or Legs 

look far Dr. Rdwr r * 

Talking Health Column 

In November 

VnilF RnrtnV 

(Neil to Ekuje rood Store) 

Auio wj Wort lUUiai Injuria 
Excluded But Cowed « !00% 



•Whiplash 

RO UND L AKE BEACH 

aamopRAcnc 



1-2800 



_~-* 



MJP' 



November 6*1998 




NEIGHBORS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 



Shriners exhibit 'Pier Elegance' 

Judge Lawrence Ingjls and Sandra Ingils, of Antioch, were among 
the more than 800 guests attending the Pier Elegance— Shriners 
Hospitals for Children Benefit at Navy Pier. The event raised more 
than $330,000 for patient care and research at 22 Orthopedic Hos- 
pitals and three Bums Institutes, Including the Chicago Shriners Hos- 
pital. It provides comprehensive orthopedic, plastic, reconstructive, 
and maxillofacial surgery and spinal cord injury care. Antloch 
Shriners attend Chain O'Lakes Shrine Club monthly meetings. Byran 
Maddox, of Mundeleln, Is president— Photo by Bob Peak 







NEIGHBORS 

Name: Sarah Sunoz 

Home: Grayslake 

Occupation: Public Information 
Coordinator, Lake County Forest 
Preserves 

I'm originally from: Milwaukee 

My family consists of: Husband 

Keith, da u gh ter Rebecca, and son 
Ian 

My pets are: A cat named Tigger 

What I like best about my town, neighborhood: The family- 
friendly, small-town atmosphere 

I relax by: Running 

My perfect day Would be: Twice the length of a regular one 

Last good book I read: Toni Morrison's "Beloved" 

What movie makes you cry?: "Dances With Wolves" 

Favorite music: Folk, classical, and rock— quite a mixed bag 

Favorite Food: Italian 

Favorite musician: Mozart 

My life's motto Is: Life is too short to sweat the small stuff 

If I could be anyone in history, I would be: Rosa Parks 

If I won the lottery, I would: Travel, live well, and donate big 
bucks to a good charity 

My greatest accomplishments are: Working with the other 
members of the Forest Preserve team to create one of the nation's 
best agencies for recreation and conservation 



H I could change one thing 
about the world ft would be: 

That children would be safe 
where ever they go 

My pet peeve Is: Errors in 
spelling and punctuation 

Most Interesting person I 
ever met was: My husband 

If I could meet anyone, I 
would meet: 

Benjamin Franklin 

My most embarrassing 
moment was: Too 

embarrassing to share here 

If I had a plane ticket to 
anywhere, I would go to: 

The Great Barrier Reef In Australia, 
to scuba dive. 

If you have a "Neighbor" that 
you would like to see profiled 
in this column, call Rhonda 
Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 





M 



•\>\r. 



'Food Share packages for vol- 
unteers, clubs, and churches are 
; due at.Iocal.banks today,- Nov: '6 in 
order to be picked-up Saturday, 

Information about eligibility re - 

' quirements Is available from Ardeen 
Harris, Antioch Food Share CoordJ- 

: natbrat B47-395-2761, • . ; < 
Antioch Food Share allows voir 
unteers to trade their hours of work . 
for discounted food packages. The 

■■; volunteer work can Include helping 
to unload the truck at the VFW Hail- 
when itls idelivered . .'■ V v ,;.: 

Antioch Share food will be dis- 
tributing their Thanksgiving food 

. packages oh Nov. 21 from 9:30 to "- 
10 a.m. at the Antioch Veterans of - 
Foreign Wars Hall at 75 North AvV 
enue. 

. - "All you need to dp Is volunteer 
two hours of your time and pay 
$15.75 and you can have a great 
turkey dinner," said Harris. I 



The cost of the package Is $15.75 
; and will; include; a 10-12 pound 
turkey and all the trimmings to make 
a Thanksgiving Dinner. 
• ; v j?> "Alry^local '? dubs or- church 
. groups may purchase turkey dinners 
for their own distribution," said Hair: 
: ris. "These groups' do. not need to 
have volunteer time." 
■"'..■■.:. "We are alsc^having bur regu- 
lar November Share package for 
$15.75 yVhlchyvill Include approxi- 
mately $35 to $40 worth of food," 
she said. "You will get three meats, 
';. fresh fruits, fresh vegetables; 'and'; 
other things to make delicious 
meals." 

Orders may be placed at the First 
National Bank- Employee Owned,. 
State Bank of The Lakes, Lake Villa 
Township Office, and Antioch Town- 
ship Office. . .:;;.; '■■:■ 
."";.■ "You must call and order by No- 
vember 6 for the Nov. 21 pickup,", 
Harris emphasized '. 



;#,, ht rfwMMMtf 6ddwtiM 

Our first year has been a success 
thanks to our loyal customers. 



lOpiftTP 



I 





, .40V. 6 

6 p.m., St Peter School Fobt- 
J igits^ $12 at dc^r/cal 1 395-0274 

Saturday, Nov. 7 

-. Happy 106th' Bird thday to Floyd 
•William Norton of the Aritloch VFW 
Post' #4551 

: Household hazardous Waste! : 
collection day iri 'An'tfdchi drop off ' ; 
at Pleviak School, 304 East Grand 
Avenue In Lake' Villa 

9 a.rri:?4 p.m., Holiday Craft Show 
held by Ladles Auxiliary at VFW,-75 
North Avenue In i Antioch •"- 

2 p.m., Antioch Public Library 
program on the "Life and Lore of 
Laura Ingalls Wilder," for* sign-up 
call395-0874 ■:■■', ' ■-.'■<...'■■■■ 



482 Orchard SL, Antioch 
847-838-3866 



(North on Ht 83, 
VV\^ on Orchard) 





We Make Your Business 

Look Good! . I 

• Letterheads 

• Business Cards 

• Resumes 

• Newsletters 

• Forms 

• Brochures 

• Programs 

• Invitations 

• More! 

RUSH SERVICE AVAILABLE 



BILLER PRESS (847) 395-411 1/ (847) 395-1203 

"We're YourType" FAX (847) 395-4232 

966 Victoria St. ■ ANTIOCH HOUR&rrtf&mto«0pm«Sai8ini. 12pm 




I 





7th Annual 

* . 

&> f -~S 1> e> e> J* 

Enjoy an enchanted forest of designer decorated 

trees and wreaths, a children's area, bake shop, 

entertainment, and holiday gifts and crafts. 

Sponsored by the Victory Hospital Foundation. 

Midlane Country Club 

4555 Yorkhouse Road, Wadsworth, Illinois 

® November 19-22, 1998 * 

Thursday/Friday... 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 

Saturday..; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 

Sunday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Purchase tickets at the door: 

Adults $4 

Senior Citizens/Children .....$2 

Call 847-360-4248 for more information. 



'•''•■■■■■<■ <rlr,W~ 6f h 



«^^&, 



. SHOWTIMES; 

***** Pm " Sunda * November 22 




-. ■ - 



Sunday, Nov. 8 

lla.rri.r4 p.m., Holiday Craft 
Show held by Ladles Auxiliary at 
VFW, 75 North Avenue in Antioch 

2 p.m., Star Recorder Chapter 
Program with other chapters at 
Antioch Moose Lodge #525, 
26020 W. Hwy. 173, Loyal Order 
of Moose and guests invited 

7-9 p.m: Open Gym ACHS, cost 
$2, adults only 

Monday, Nov. 9 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

" 7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose 
Lodge, Rte, 173 west of Antioch 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 
Band at ACHS, info, at 395-5566 

9 a.m. : - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents . 
Day Out for Infants to 5 year olds, 
call 395-1362 

l1,»4l,1,»>f.l1|(a<tI,lH4l>»M>l>lt(»t«4, a <1,l,,lIIM„( I tl...t. > 

11 a.m. MRP (for adults 55 and 
older) meets at Antioch Senior 
Center, 817 Holbeck Dr., tor more 
i- info caff 395-5068 

' HI|JI.'I( ( ..UW.I..-I.I.|H11I.. (IM....1 

6;45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
refreshments available. Doors 
open at 4:30 p.m., calf 395-5393 

7:00-8:00 p.m. Weigh to Win 
program held at Calvary Christian 
Center, Monavilte Rd., 356-6181 

Wednesday, Nov. 11 

No School today 

11 a.m. Veteran's Day Memorial 
Service at Hillside Cemetery, Rte. 
173 and 59, rain location is the 
VFW Hall, 75 North Ave. 

1 p.m., Antioch Woman's Club 
meeting at United Methodist 
Church of Antioch, call 395-4210 

6:30 p.m. CPR classes sponsored 
by the Antioch Rescue Squad, call 
395-5511 for reservations 

7:30 p.m., Lakeland Newcomers 

Club holds annual charity auction 

at the Lindenhurst State Bank of 

the Lakes, proceeds go to A Safe 

Place shelter, for more info, call 

Laura at (815) 675-2317 

» 

Thursday, Nov. 12 

8:45-11 a.m. MOPS (Mothers of 
Pre-Schoolers) meets at Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church. $5/craft 
and child care, call 395-4117 

9:30-11:30 a.m. Prairie Patch 
Quilting Guild meets at Shepherd 
of the Lakes Church, Grayslake, 
call 223-1204 for more details 

7:30 p.m. ACHS AMPS meets in 
band room, call 395-7826 

GOT SOMETHING 

GOING ON? CALLUS] 

A 14-day notice is needed 
far all calendar requests. 
AskfarCristinaFeindt 
223-8161, ext. 141. 









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AB/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



November 6, 1998 




High School reunion time 



W.C. Petty summer readers 

In front of a new W.C. Petty mural, a few of the 107 students who participated in the Parent 
Teacher Organization summer reading program show off books they won as prizes. By reading at 
least 600 minutes over the summer, students received a book and the choice of either a free 
Dunkin' Donut or a free video rental from Video Empire Rental, courtesy of Antioch businessman 
Larry Mondie. In the front row, from left: Billy McHugh, Mike Hucker, Kathryn Westrate, Booker 
Gibson, Chris Hall, Donald Pawlowski, Brett McKenzie, Peter Niles, Betsy Chrlstenson; Back row, 
from left: Nick Markovich, Brigette Napier, Scott McAlonan, Caltlin Erickson, Alex McKenzie, Nick 
Johnson, Gretchen Kessell, Ricky Geib and Jamie Leavitt. Photo by Lynn Gunnarson Dahistrom. 



Fox Chain O'Lakes winter drawdown to begin Nov. 1 



the William G. Slraiton Lock 
and Dam at McHenry will begin 
winter drawdown of the upper l ; ox 
Uiver/Chain O'Likes water levels on 
Nov. 1, according to Lockmaster 
Frank Novak. 

Target date to reach winter pool 



{10 inches below the normal watdr 
level) is Dec. 1. 

The Slraiton Lock and Dam is 
operated by the Illinois Department 
of Natural Resources (IDNH). The 
1DNR welcomes comments regard- 
ing the continuation of iho winter 



drawdown. Interested parlies 
should contact the IDNR's Office of 
Water by writing lo 524 S. Second 
St., Springfield, 1L 62701 -1787. 

Questions regarding the winter 
drawdown can be directed to Novak 
al(lll r >):iflf,-2848. 



The Antioch High School 
Class of 1979 is planning 
their 20 year reunion. 
Although the details have 
not been worked out for the festiv- 
ides that will take place, you can 
bet the committee will keep us 
informed of the upcoming event. 
Right now though they are work- 
ing on locating as many of the 
classmates as possible. To date 
they still have a whole list of lost 
or missing classmates and would 
like the good readers from Antioch 
to try and help locate some of the 
unfound. 

Here they are: Cindy Alton, 
Jeff Andrews, Dona Anderson, Bill 
Atwood, Robert Axen, Benjamin 
Baurer, Michelle Bayless, Ron 
Berglund, Kathy Bielawaki, Fonest 
Boger, Jane Breest, Lee Broks, 
Duane Bucher, Steve Burritt, Beth 
Bushell, Pat Campo, Nick Carl, Jim 
Clark, Scott Clark, Jim Collis, Jim 
Dacve. 

Steven Dauck, Francesca Diaz, 
Karen Dilger, Ron Dilger, John 
Dodaro, Kathy Dodge, Edward 
Dubberke, Julie Ellsworth, Mark 
Evert, Lisa Favia, Bill Fish, Sue 
Flam, Kim Fox, Anthony Frook, 
Conine Ginkel, Liz Gracyas, 
Denise Grohs, Terry Hedlen, Ken 
Hensel, Kathy Hiraboyoski, Linda 
Hoffeditz, Kelly Horton, Laura 
lerbe. 

Mike Johnson, Nancy 
Johnston, Susan Juergensen, Steve 
Kelly, Andrea Kleban, John 
Krueger, Timothy Kufawinski, 
Mike Kurth, Todd Kurth, Joyce 
Landt, Tony Lascola, Scott Leland, 
Lori Lewis, Suki Lewis, Mike 
Lischowsic, Barbara Lombardo, 
Jeffery Long, David Lucas, Gretta 
Lucas, Beth Maloney, Virginia 
Martini, John Martiny, Pat 
McDermott. 

Janet McMurry, Ralph 



W. HH*H»HMWI«H*H< l l l t W)) lrt»| l WM n ii , HIHt|MW| 

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Mendlcino, Enrique t a MeJia, 
Julie Miller, Rhonda Mills, Ken 
Mitchell, Dave Mittle, James 
Moog, Bill Muny, Kathy 
Mylinski, Glenn Neff, Karen 
Nelson, Thomas Nieland, John 
Nischan, Pat Norwlck, Beth Ott, 
John Palmieri, Stan Parzych, 
Mark Phillips, Ann Renfro, 
Francis Riezliner, Charles 
Rogers, Tim-Sanderson, Timothy 
Sauber. 

Timothy Schnieder, Charlie 
Schrelber, Elaine Schroeder, 
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Harold Shouse, Patrick Slkorski, 
Amelia Silva, Mark Simmons, 
Gregory Spears, Paul Starr, Patty 
Stout, Joe Stmts, Richard Sweica, 
Jody Swiderek, Jim Teschke, Joyce 
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Wates, Kevin Weaver, Bob Wells, 
Mike Wencka, Donna 
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If you know the whereabouts 
of any of these folks, give a call to 
Dawn (Quendenfeld) Sclchowski 
(81S) 675-2799, Sandy (Morris) 
Maday 395-5893 or Jack Fields 
395-1010 as soon as possible. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from jingle." 



Readers with information for 
"Jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



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IKE 

CUPBOARD 






I ■ 
■ 



BmukmO'Neill 





. .: ■:■'':■■:■ 

teams 




playoffs tough 



Four varsity football teams 
from Lakeland's coverage 
area earned playoff berths 
last week, and after last 
weekend's games, only one sur- 
vived. 

The scores read like mismatch- 
es—except for one. Libertyville 45, 
Belleville East 0; Hubbard 40, Anti- 
och 10; Morris 31, Wauconda7; 
Montini 21, Johnsburg20. One 
thing became very evident with 
these games: just because a team 
makes the playoffs, does not mean 
they're a threat to win the state ti- 
de. 

On one hand you have Liber- 
tyville, the Lake County Jugger- 
naught who absolutely destroyed 
an unsuspecting Belleville East 
team, and should make a run 
deep into the state post-season 
toumey. 

On the other is Antioch and 
Wauconda, each had to win their 
last game of the season just to get 
into the playoffs. Antioch ran into 
Hubbard's all -everything running 
back, who racked up 330 yards 
and scored five touchdowns (4 
rushing), and Wauconda had to 
face Morris, the third ranked team 
in Class 4A, 

But Johnsburg, one of the top 
teams in Class 3A, was supposed 
to roll over Lombard-Montini, a 
team that sounds like it goes better 
with an olive or a twist than 220 
rushing yards against the fourth- 
ranked Sky hawks. 



w. 



ith the first round of the 
playoffs in the books, it means it's 
time to announce our 1998 All- 
Lakeland Football Team. 

The entire team is laid out on 
the next sports page, but here are 
the highlights: 



Player of the Year 

J,C. Harrington, quarterback, 
Libertyville 

Coach of the Year 

Bob Kasper, Wauconda 

Newcomer of the Year 

Dallas Bassett, freshman, 
Round Lake 

Defensive Player of the Year 

Cody Ramsey, linebacker, 
Libertyville 

All-purpose Player of the Year 

Ben Hodges, quarterback, 
Mundelein 



T, 



he team is littered with Liber- 
tyville players, as the number two 
team in the state clearly has the 
best defense and best offense of 
any teams in our coverage area. 
Also, the Wildcats boast the Flayer 
of the Year and Defensive Player of 
the Year. 

Also, look for names like Ben 
Hodges, Dallas Bassett, Don 
Lackey, Jim Richardson, Leo 
Labile, and Aaron Behm, be- 
cause these will be the big names 
coming into next year's football 
season. 



Brendan O'Neill can be reached 
at (847) 223-8161, ext. 132; fax 
(847) 223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd.com. 






. ■ v, ..'!■£'■ ■■ .?' . ]K" II 
■■ • ..-'••v-V'Ti •>■-■■ ■ I^mI 

Novembers, 1998 




Lakeland Newspapers/ A& 





By BRENDAN O'NEILL 

Sports Editor 

All year long he Antioch varsity 
football team had made believers out • 
of many who thought the Sequoits 
would not be a playoff contender in . 
the tough North Suburban Confer- 
ence. Theyproved the critics, and this . 
newspaper, wrong, by posting a 6-3 
record and reaching the 5A playoffs. 

But Antioch got a tough draw In 
the first round of the playoffs: Hub- 
bard. The result was a 40-10 rout of 
the Sequoits, as Antioch's defense 
could not get a hand on running 
back Charles Frazler. 

Hubbard's Frazler was unstop- 
pable as he ran over, around and 
through the Antioch defense. Frazler 
ran the ball 17 times for an amazing 
330 yards and scored four touch- 
downs on the ground. He added one 
40-yard TD catch for good measure, 
decimating the Sequoits defensive 
unit by himself. 

Frazier's success running the ball 
(19.4 yards per carry average) was just 
too much for the Sequoits to over- 
come, and Antioch's surprising sea- 
son was over. 

Positives for the 1998 Sequoits in- 
cluded the running of senior halfback 
Matt Ingrum, the passing of junior 
quarterback Don Lackey, and the re- 
ceiving of wideout Jim Richardson. 

Ingrum racked up 754 yards and 
eight touchdowns, including a 211- 
yard performance early In the year. 

Lackey, the team leader and the 
number one returning offensive 
threat, threw for 913 yards and eight 
touchdowns — a great year for a ju- 
nior quarterback. 

Most of Lackey's passes ended 
up in the Velcro-like hands of 
Richardson, who is also returning 
and should help the 1999 Sequoits 
build a lethal passing attack. 
Richardson caught 444 yards worth 
of lackey's passes, good for three 
touchdowns, and should be a force 
to reckon with next year in the NSC. 

Defensively, Antioch was led by 
hard-nosed senior linebacker/de- 
fensive lineman Nate Carden, who 
led the team tn tackles and punished 
the opposition with every hit He, like 
Richardson, was named to the All- 
Lakeland First Team for anchoring 
the Sequoits solid defense. 

Lackey and Ingrum were named 
to the All-Lakeland Honorable Men- 
tion squad, and fans of the Sequoits 
should look for Antioch' to again 
make a playoff run. 




Above, Antioch receiver Jim 
Richardson tries to outrun a 
Hubbard defender as he 
scrambles for more yards. 
Right, junior defensive lineman 
Ron Nissen leads a swarm of 
Sequoits to try and corral Hub- 
bard's Charles Frazler in Anti- 
och's 40-10 playoff loss.— 
Photo by Steve Young 



&?,'&£> ■;.. 




'Optimism' key word for Grayslake in '99 



ByLEERLAS 
Staff Reporter 



Optimism: n; Tendency to hope 
for the best 

That's the key word for Dan Dil- 
lon and the Grayslake Rams for 1999 
after a 2-7 campaign in the 1998 sea- 
son. 

"We're losing some key people, 
but were also gaining some good 
players," said Dillon. "We will be 
building on this year." 



The Grayslake Rams started out 
the year 0-5, losing to Prairie Ridge, 
Gary-Grove, Dundee Crown, Jacobs 
and Woodstock to start the season. 

But, something snapped In that 
Woodstock game, the defense be- 
came meaner, while the offense 
found what they had been lacking. 

Alex Frank, the leader of the 
charge, exploded all over Crystal 
Lake Central, scoring five touch- 
downs in one night to lead a rout of 
CLC, ending a 13 game losing streak. 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



Name: Don Lackey 
Schools Antioch 
Sport: Football 
Yean Junior 
Lost week's stats: 
Named All-Lakeland 
Honorable Mention 
based on his 913 yards 
passing and 8 touch- 
downs. 




Ingrum 



Name: Matt Ingrum 
School: Antioch 
Sport: Football 
Year: Senior 
Last week's stats: 
Named All-Lakeland 
Honorable Mention 
based on his 754 yards 
rushing and 8 touch- 
downs. 



Then, the Rams beat up Lake 
Zurich, giving the team a momen- 
tum swing going into perennial pow- 
erhouse McHenry and their unde- 
feated season. 

That's when the streak came to 
an end. Grayslake lost a tough one to 
McHenry, but looked like a good 
team in the loss. The Rams averaged 
a net yardage of 5.7 yards per play 
and proved that they were a willing 
participant in the toughest confer- 
ence around. 

■ "I'm very proud of the way the 
kids played against McHenry," Dil- 
lon said hi post game conferences. "I 
feel we competed very well against 
McHenry and I feel we can compete 
in this conference." 

Call it a carry-over effect, but the 
Rams lost the final game of the year 
to Crystal Lake South by a score of 
19-16. 

Yet, all In all, DUlon calls the year 
a success. 

"We played pretty well against all 
the teams in the conference," Dillon 



said. "We will be building on this for 
the years to come." 

However, next year's rebuilding 
project will be huge. The three big 
losses .that Grayslake will have to 
overcome for next year include los- 
ing Frank, senior defensive captain 
and all conference player Wes An- 
derson and defensive run stopper 
Adam Perigren. But, the one key re- 
turning player from this year is junior 
starting quarterback Willie Wright 

"We need some juniors to step in 
for next year, while some sopho- 
mores wiU step in for starters. Also, 
we'll probably call up some fresh- 
men to plug some holes." 

Dillon is looking forward to next 
year. 

"It's a challenge every week, and 
that's what makes it fun," Dillon said. 
"Our offense will change and our de- 
fense will change with the kids that 
are playing. But that's what makes 
this fun. You put everything togeth- 
er, put the kids on the field and let 
them play." 



;TT-^T*. } Jill ^ U,-»7--r.»v ? . 



^— 












■ 



1998 ALL-LAKELAND FOOTBALL TEAM 



,ty/: 



AlO / Lakeland Newspapers 



November 6, 1998 



■ 



J.C. Harrington named Lakeland Player 






Harrington looks to lead Wildcats deep into state playoffs 



Libertyville quarterback J.C. Harrington led the 
Wildcats to a 9-0 regular season and the NSC 
title, and hopes to do the same in the playoffs, 
culminating in a state title for the Wildcats. 
—Photo by Sandy Bressner 



By BRENDAN O'NEILL 
Sports Editor 

Last year Libertyville went 8-1 in the regular season and 
dropped out of the playoffs in the second round. This year, 
the Wildcats went 9-0 in the regular season, and after a 45-0 
win in the first round, many people predict to see Libertyville 
in the state title game at the end of November. The reason: 
J.C. Harrington. 

Harrington, a second-year starter at quarterback for the 
Wildcats, is a seasoned senior passer on an unbelievably bal- 
anced Libertyville football team. Last year, Harrington took 
his lumps and learned from his mistakes. He finished the 
year with 995 yards on 80- 15? passing and threw for four 
touchdowns. 

Ihis wax, a much unproved and more mature passer, 
rlaftington !fd area passers with 1, 385 yards through the au 
and L.< touchdowns. Remarkably. Harrington was by no 
mean* the o/d\ option tor the offense, and could have easily 
thrown tor near _\0U0 yards and JO IDs on the year. 

But Harrington remained the relaxed, veteran quarter- 
back that libert\Mlle needed to offset its strong running 
game levt by Matt Vreutelaar. 

'He is much improved lover Inst year! in every area. In 
tlie off- season he really worked on getting bigger and 
stronger in the weight room. Every aspect of his game is bet- 
ter," said Ubertyvttle's varsity head football coach Randy 
(arceyeski. 

Kuceyeski and the rest of the Wildcats' football program 
has benefitted from Harrington's varied skills, and Kuceyeski, 
in particular, is very pleased with the well-roundedness of his 



star quarterback, 

"His strength is his work ethic and athletic ability. The. 
combination of those two things has made him a big part of 
this team," said Kuceyeski. "He is maybe the finest young 
man we've had come through our school. In his studies, 
community service, school activitiesJi don't know how any- 
one could do more that he has," . 

And Harrington's mettle as a person translates Into a 
strong leader on the football field, in the weight room and in 
the classroom. 

"He's not a real vocal leader, but he leads by example. 
Again, it's his work ethic that people see and it makes them 
work that mcuh harder," said Kuceyeski. 

Harrington's tends to let the game come to him, like so 
many coaches preach to their quartemacks, and with the 
libertyville ground game, he has the luxury of being patient 
enough to do that. The first round of the playoffs was a great 
example of that, 

Hnrington threw just 1 1 passes for 127 yards, but he com- 
pleted eight and three were for touchdowns. Just another day 
at the office. 

"He instilled a lot of confidence in the offense (during the 
year). Everyone expected him to do well, and he proved 
them all right. He exceeded everyone's expectations," said 
Kuceyeski. 

Harrington still has one goal he wants to achieve, the ulti- 
mate goal: a state championship. And if he approaches this 
year's playoff run as he has everything else In his high school 
career, Libertyville will be sitting atop the the heap, with a 
state title in the trophy case. 



FIRST TEAM 




OFFENSE 

QB J.C. Harrington Sr, Libertyville 1385 yds, 13 TDs 

RB Mike Madsen Sr, Johnsburg 1 193 yds, 18 TDs 



DEFENSE 




RB Jon Styx 



Sr, CarmeJ 1062 yds, 17 TDs 



WR Kevin Howell Sr, Libertyville 490 yds, 5 TDs 

E&£%> WR Jim Richardson Sr, Antioch 444yds, 3TDs 

TE Kevin Walter Sr, Libertyville 505 yds, 4TDs 

OL Dan Smith Sr, Johnsburg 5-10, 295 lbs 




Wffi DL. NateCarden Sr, Antioch 6-0, 228 lbs 

DL Cody Ramsey Sr, Libertyville 5-11, 225 lbs 

DL Brian Peterson Sr, Round Lake 6-1, 275 lbs 

DL Rich Federer Sr, Carmel 6-0, 240 lbs 

LB Wes Anderson Sr,Grayslake 6-2, 225 lbs 

LB AdamDaSilva Sr, Libertyville 6-0, 195lbs 







LB Mike Ryndak Sr, Carmel 



6-0, 200 lbs 



OL Tom Hermes Sr, Carmel 



6-4, 246 lbs 



--■... DB Josh Janik 



Sr, Johnsburg 6-1, 190 lbs 



OL Brian Rogers Sr, Round Lake 6-4, 310 lbs 
OL Derek Williams Sr, Round Lake 6-5, 285 lbs 
OL EdGilreath Sr, Libertyville 6-3, 225 lbs 



Honorable Mention 

QB Mike Brandow, Sr, WTHS; QB Brad Toussaint, Sr, JHS; QB Ben 

Hodges, Sr, MHS; QB Don Lackey, Jr, ACHS; QB Tim Gertz, Sr, 

WHS; QB Chris Gaulin, Sr, CHS; RB Matt Treutelaar, Sr, LHS; QB 

Aaron Behm, Sr, GHS; RB Matt Ingrum, Sr, ACHS; RB Alex Frank, 

Sr, GLK; RB Dante Daniels, Sr, WTHS; WR Josh Janik, Sr, JHS; WR 

Josh Gray, Sr, WTHS; QB Matt Ellison, Sr, GLK 




DBDaveManek Sr, Libertyville 5-9, 160 lbs 

DB DanAhlgrim Jr, Mundelein 6-0, 155 lbs 



S%$$|k DB M ik e Grischeau Sr, Grant 



5-8, 160 lbs 



Honorable Mention 

DB Eric Wulff, Sr, GHS; DB Albert Lozano, Sr, RLK; LB Joe Torres, 

Sr, WTHS; LB Don Fuchs, JHS; LB Tim Gertz', Sr, WHS; LB Nick 

Koch, Sr, GHS; LB Geoff Hunn, Sr, CHS; DL Jeff Bays, Sr, JHS; DB 

Mike Beverley, Sr, GLK; LB Ryan Nally, MHS; DL Jim Bendix, Jr, 

MHS; DL Adam Peregrin, Sr, GLK; DL C.J. Cusker, Sr, WTHS; 

DB Randi Dey, Sr, RLK; LB Dan Romito, Sr, LHS 



Defensive Player of the Year 

DL Cody "Big Train" Ramsey, Sr, Libertyville 

Had 46 tackles, 2 forced fumbles and 1 sack as leader of 

one of the best defenses in the stats 

All-Purpose Player of the Year 

QB Ben Hodges, Jr, Mundelein 

433 yards rushing, 5TDs 
59-141 passing, 898 yards, 6TDs 



i 



Coach of the Year 

Bob Kasper, 1st year at Wauconda 

Predicted to finish 3-4, Rasper's Bulldogs 

finished 7-2 and earned a playoff berth 

Newcomer of the Year 

QB/RB Dallas Basset, Fr, Round Lake 

Started as both quarterback and running back, adding to the 

Panthers potent inside running attack 



' 



. .' * 



November 6, 1998 




SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 'A1 f 



The lindenhurst Blaze U -9 boys 
soccer team finished off their fall 
league play With their 5th shutout of 
the season as they defeated the 
Chicago AAC Eagles 3-0 at Forest 
Vi ew Park. Wl tii the victory, the Blaze 
assured themselves of second place 
In their division. 

The Blaze lost the flip of the 
coin and the Eagles elected to 
take the wind for the first half. 
The first quarter saw the Blaze get 
numerous scoring chances but 
they failed to put the ball into the 
net. The second quarter was 
much the same and the half end- 
ed with the game tied 0-0. 

The second half was a differ- 
ent story as the Blaze got the wind 
and their first lead of the game at 
8:00 of the third quarter when 
Kurt Houghton put In a rebound 
off a shot by Kyle Sytsma. The 
Blaze had the pressure on the Ea- 



gles goalie as they outshot them 
8-0 In the third quarter. In the 
fourth quarter, the Blaze contin- 
ued their offensive pressure with 
12 more shots. at goal which re- 
sulted into two unassisted boom- 
ing shots by Colin O'Malley. The 
Eagles goalie kept the game from 
getting out of hand all day as he 
constantly kept forwards Tommy 
Sewart, Sytsma, Alex Kelley and 
Connor O'Keefe from scoring. 

As it has been all season, the 
defense of the Blaze was out- 
standing. They have only allowed 
1 1 goals in 10 games for the entire 
season. They were led by Brian 
Hook, Ethan Hahn, Matt Laine, 
Brian Mooney, and Andrew Stein. 
Chris Church, Stein, and Sewart 
shared the goalkeeping duties for 
the Blaze. The Blaze were 
coached by BUI Houghton and 
John Sytsma. 




U-19 Power tie Speed 0-0 



The Lindenhurst Power drove 
down the road to take on the Lake 
Forest Speed and returned home 
with a 0-0 tie. Despite out-shooting 
Lake Forest and controlling the play 
for most of the game, the Power was 
unable to dent the Lake Forest net, 

-The offensive hustle of Teri 

[LaRoche and Jamie Wlsmer resulted 

several shots that all went just 

iches wide, and Sarah Richardson 

ent a hard shot off the cross bar. 



Several non-calls failed to yield 
any penalty kick opportunities for 
the Power, while also giving Lake 
Forest several breakaway opportuni- 
ties on the other end of the field. 
Kristina Giangiorgi made 14 saves, 
two of them on point blank break- 
aways, to earn the shutout Jenny 
Barbera, Christy Plotz and Kristen 
Gamlin headed up the defensive ef- 
fort The Power is now U-7-2 on the 
season. 



YOUTH iCELESS HOCKEY 



Grade 1/2 
Hull Division 

Ducks 5 1 

Blues 4 1 

Flyers 4 2 

Bruins 3 1 

Elackhawfcs 2 3 1 

Stars2 3 4 

Redwings 1 4 

Pen quins 6 
Savard Division 
Grade 3/4 

Blackhawks 7 

Blues 5 1 

Stars3 3 1 7 

Penguins 3 3 

Ducks 2 4 1 

Bruins 2 5 

Flyers 1 4 1 

Redwings 1 5 
Gretzky Division 

Lightning 6 1 

Panthers 6 1 

Kings 5 2 

Sabres 3 3 

Canadlens 2 4 

Islanders 2 5 

Canucks 1 4 1 

Sharks 1 5 



■ 



10 

8 

8 

7 
5 

2 




14 
10 

6 
5 
4 
3 
2 

12 

12 

10 

6 

4 

4 

3 

2 



U owe Division 
Grade 5/6 

Redwings 
Flyers 
Penguins 
Ducks 

Stors3 
Blues 
Bruins 

Blackhawks 

Orr Division 

Canucks 

Kings 

Sharks 

Canadlens 

Islanders 

Sabres 

Panthers 

Lightning 

Morris Division 

Penquins 

SlarsG 

Blues 

Redwings 

Ducks 

Blackhawks 

Flyers 

Bruins 



7 
6 
4 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 



14 

1 13 
8 
8 
7 

4 

1 3 
2 



5 J 

5 1 1 

3 3 
3 

4 

4 

5 
6 



3 
2 

2 





1 11 

11 

6 

6 

5 
4 
2 




6 

4 
3 
2 
2 
1 




1 13 
13 
I 9 



******************************************************* 




Join the College of Lake County* 

for a public memorial service 

honoring all veterans. 

1998 Veterans Day 

Ceremony 

Noon Wednesday, Nov. 1 1 

(Pre-ceremony concert by the U.S. Navy Band 
at 11:45 a.m.) Auditorium, C005 

Guest speaker Rear Admiral Edward Hunter | 
Newly appointed Commander 
at the Great Lakes 
Naval Training Center 



Posting of the colors by the Great Lakes Naval Training * 
Center color guard and placement of a wreath on the 
CLC veterans memorial. 



For information, call 847-543-2290. 

College of Lake County 

19351 W.Washington St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 



Running for daylight 

Antioch Junior quarterback Don Lackey turns up field In the Sequolts' 40-10 playoff loss to Hubbard 
last weekend.— Photo by Steve Young 

Vikings advance to conference semifinals 



The Antioch Vikings won four of 
four games played. The Lightweight 
and heavyweight advanced to the 
conference semi-finals white the 
PeeWees and featherweights won 
their final regular season games. 

On a soggy field in Mundeleln, 
the Antioch Raider featherweights 
shut out the Warren Blue Demons 
12-0 and won their fifth game of the 
year. In seven games played, the 
featherweights have allowed just 19 
total points. Antioch scored on its 
first possession as Tyler Artelt scored 
on a 37 yard end around. Mike 
Kroepfl added a second TD on a 5- 
yard run. Kroepfl also had an inter- 
ception. The defense recorded an- 
other shut out and had three fumble 
recoveries^-one each by AJ. John- 
son, Frank Angoli, and John Ring. 

The Antioch PeeWees won their 
sixth game of the season — 37-0 over 
Warren White. Jo Jo Johnson scored 
three TDs and Kevin Barrett added 



two more TDs. A sixth touchdown 
was scored on a 65 yard pass play to 
Brandon Geweke. The defense held 
Warren to minus yardage and was 
led by Ty Ankney, Bubba Houghton, 
Ty Bynum, Mike Wegrzyn, Jo Jo 
Johnson. Bynum had a fumble re- 
covery. The PeeWees will battle Fox 
Lake in the semi-finals of the confer- 
ence playoffs at Mundelein High 
School. 

The Antioch Viking lightweights 
had another easy time in defeating 
Mundeleln 27-0 in first round league 
playoff action, it was the teams 62nd 
straight win. Running back Taylor 
Ho sick scored a pair of touchdowns 
in leading the Vikings offensive 
game. QB Tony Weyenberg scored a 
third Antioch TD on a QB sneak, and 
Tim Veach added a fourth touch- 
down on a 27 yard run. The offensive 
line controlled the line of scrimmage 
and was led by Brian Wood, Eric 
Worrell, James Larson, Josh Pad- 



dock, Andrew Homer, Tim Veach 
and Luke Davis. Mundelein man- 
aged just three first downs as strong 
defensive games were turned In by 
Brett Bairstow, Jeff Canella, Nick 
Diddel, Justin Gary, Matt Houtari, 
Larson, Veach , Hosick, Paddock, 
Mike Decker and Adam Lehn. 

The Antioch heavyweights won 
their fifth game of the year — a hard 
fought 7-0 victory over Highland 
Park. The Vikings Jim Breen recov- 
ered a high park rumbles late in the 
first half. Then Brandon Zelmann 
scored the only TD. The Viking de- 
fensive unit then shut the door on 
and Highland Park drives. Defensive 
standouts were Scott Gerke, Brian 
Flore, Jason Kaminsky, Ken Barth, 
Breen, Travis Mumm — who inter- 
cepted a Highland Park pass late in 
the game, Ghase Saldivar. The offen- 
sive line of Chris Becker, Russell Zig- 
oraski, Tim Lorenzini, Brian Flore, 
and Nick Arnold played well. 



<f 



Get the 






Rest 



& 



YoutNeed 



v 



• DO YOU FEEL TIRED EVEN AFTER A FULL NIGHT'S SLEEP? 

• Do YOU SNORE LOUDLY? 

• do you often wake up with a headache? 

• do you feel very sleepy or fall asleep 

while driving, at work or during other waking hours? 

• do you have problems remembering or concentrating? 

• Are you often irritable? 




s 



ik 



l~l 



If you answered yes to any of these questions, talk to your healthcare provider. You may 
be suffering from sleep apnea or another health problem. Treatment is available. 



The NEW Sleep Disorder Center 
at Victory Memorial Hospital 

Victory's Sleep Disorder Center provides treatment 
for sleep apnea and other related disorders. For more 
information on how the center can help you, call 



l-SOO-THE-CHOICEdsoo-s^^M,. 



1ST 




Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



1324 North Sheridan Road 
Waukcgun, Illinois 60085 



****************************************************** 



- - 



, 



-*> »•■ » ■* 



A12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LEGAL NOTICES 



■ ", ■ 
November 6, 1998 






PUDUC NOTICE 

The Loon Lakes Management As- 
sociation Annual Meeting will bo held 
Thursday Nov. 1 9, 1 998 at the Antloch 
Senior Center, B17 Holbek Drive. An- 
tioch. Illinois, 60002 at 7:30 p.m 

The meeting will consist of the reg- 
ular Business Meeting along with the 
Bi- Annual Election for the following Of- 
ficers: President, Treasurer and Two 
At-large Directors. 

Anyone residing or owning proper- 
ty within boundaries of Special Service 
Area-8 In and around Loon Lakes is 
encouraged to come and cast their 
vote. 

1098D-2194-AR 

November 6, 1996 

November 13. 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS; The Clean 

Choice 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY 648 Colony 
Ave . Undenhurst. IL 60046 (847) 265 
1530 

NAME{S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS 
Yvetle Ezell. 648 Colony Ave . Linden 
hurst. IL 60046 (B47) 265-1530 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

Tins <s to comfy ihal the undesigned 
iniond(s) to conduct lie above named 
business Irom the location(s) indicated 
and thai the true or real full name(s) of 
the pe'sonfs) owning conduchng or 
transacting the business is-are correct 
as shown 
sYvelte Ezell. OcloDer 29 1998 

The loregomg instrument was ac 
knowiedged before rno by the per 
son(s) intending lo conduct the busi 
ness (his 29lh day ol October t998 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
.s Karen A Kerley 
Notary Pubhc 
Received October 29. 1998 
Wiliard R Heiandcr 
Lake County Clerk 
! 19BA-2232-LV7LN 
November 6. 199B 
November 13. 1998 
November 20. 1998 



la 



Your News 
is 

Our News! 

Call us 

with your 

story ideas 

at 

(847) 223-8161 

or fax us al 

(847) 223-8810 



PUBUC NOTICE 
SPECIAL TOWNSHIP MEETING 

The Antloch Township wilt hold a 
'Spec la I" meeting on November 20, 
1998 at 5:45 pm. at the Antloch Town- 
ship Hall, 99 W. Rt. 173, Antioch. IL. 
The sole purpose is for transferring the 
Lagoona Subdivision Account to the 
AnUoch Township Road & Bridge fund. 
The funds will be used to benefit the 
Lagoona Subdivision. 

RESCHEDULE MEETING 

The Regular Township mealing Is 
rescheduled from November 12th lo 
November 20th, The lime of this meet- 
ing will be 6:00 pm The meeting will be 
held at the Antioch Township Hall, 99 
W Rt 173. Antioch. Illinois 

1198A-2240-AN 
November 6. 1 998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
Notice is hereby given that on No- 
vember 29, 1893 aM 1:00 a.m. a sale 
will be held at Dolphin Harbor, 28222 
W. Oak Ave.. Antloch. IL 60002 to sell 
the following article to enforce a lien 
existing under the laws of the State of 
Illinois against such articles for labor, 
service, skin or material extended upon 
a storage furnished for such articles at 
the request of the following designat- 
ed persons, unless such articles are 
redeemed within thirty days of the 
publication of this notice. 
Sherwin and Sandra Mlllman, Boat: 
Four Winns-215 Sundowner-Lenglh- 
21*1. 

Registration AIL9265GY HIN- 
4WNMN615F787 Amt. owed 

S2.000.00 

1098E-2220-AN 

October 30, 1998 

November 6. 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

IN THE CIRCUfT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

HOUSE 

Board of education of Anlloch Community High School District No. 117, 

Plaintiff 
v. 
Heritage Standard Bank and Trust Company, ot al., Defendants 
Cose No.: 98 ED 21 
The requisite afftdavit for publication having been filed. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
YOU, Heritage Standard Bank end Trust Company, Frank John Gavin, Joan R, 
Gavin ond unknown owners. Defendants in iho abovo-captioned suit, that a Com- 
plaint to Condemn Property was filed on September 3. 1998, in the Circuit Court for 
the Nineteenth Judicial Crrcuii. Lake County. Illinois, by the above-named Plaintiff 
against you, praying Ihe Court for the condemnation of ihe loiiowing properties: 
PARCEL 1: 

THE NORTH 29 ACRES OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTH WEST QUAR- 
TER OF SECTION 27. TOWNSHIP 46 NORTH. RANGE 10. EAST OF THE THIRD 
PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN. (EXCEPT THAT PART THEREOF DESCRIBED AS FOL- 
LOWS TOWIT COMMENCING AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID HALF 
QUARTER SECTION 298 75 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTH WEST CORNER 
THEREOF. THENCE EAST PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH LINE OF SAID NORTH- 
WEST OUARTER. 253 25 FEET, THENCE SOUTH PARALLEL WITH THE WEST 
LINE OF SAID HALF OUARTER SECTION, 320 FEET. MORE OR LESS. TO A 
POINT 75 FEET EAST OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF PREMISES CONVEYEO 
TO TRUSTEE OF GRAVE YARD BY DEED RECORDED JANUARY 19. 1861, IN 
BOOK 32 OF DEEDS, PAGE 2B3 AND 284; THENCE WESTERLY TO THE SOUTH- 
WEST CORNER OF SAID PREMISES CONVEYED BY SAID DEED AND THENCE 
NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID HALF QUARTER SECTION TO THE 
PLACE OF BEGINNING AND EXCEPT THAT PART THEREOF, DESCRIBED AS 
FOLLOWS, TO- WIT- BEGINNING AT A POINT IN THE WEST LINE OF SAID NORTH 
WEST QUARTER 644 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTH WEST CORNER; THENCE 
EAST 109 4 FEET. THENCE SOUTH 2B7 FEET, THENCE WEST 109.3 FEET TO 
THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTH WEST OUARTER; THENCE NORTH 283 FEET 
TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING AND EXCEPT THAT PART THEREOF FALLING IN 
STATE AID ROUTE NO 18) IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
PARCEL 2: 

THAT PART OF THE SOUTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 22. TOWNSHIP 
AND RANGE AFORESAID. DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS. TO WIT COMMENCING 
AT THE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 22. THENCE NORTH 66 
RODS, THENCE EAST 80 RODS. THENCE SOUTH 66 RODS AND THENCE WEST 
80 RODS TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. IN LAKE COUNTY. ILLINOIS 
PARCEL 3: 

THAT PART OF THE SOUTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 
AND RANGE AFORESAID, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS. TO-WIT: COMMENCING 
AT THE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTH WEST 
QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22. THENCE NORTH 2B RODS, THENCE EAST 40 
RODS, THENCE SOUTH 28 RODS. THENCE WEST 40 RODS TO THE PLACE OF 
BEGINNING. IN LAKE COUNTY. ILLINOIS 
PARCEL 4; 

ALL THAT PART OF THE NORTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 27, TOWN- 
SHIP 46 NORTH, RANGE 10. EAST QF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN. DE- 
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS BEGINNING AT A POINT IN THE WEST LINE OF SAID 
NORTH WEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 27,644 FEET SOUTH OF THE 
NORTH WEST CORNER THEREOF. THENCE NORTH B7 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 
EAST 109 4 FEET. THENCE SOUTH 287 FEET. THENCE WEST 109 3 FEET TO 
THE WEST LINE OF SAID NORTH WEST OUARTER, THENCE NORTH ALONG 
SAID WEST LINE 283 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING (EXCEPTING THERE- 
FROM THE WEST 33 FEET), IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

Unless you. Heritage Standord Bank and Trust Company, Frank John Gavin, 
Joan R. Gavin ond unknown owners, lite or otherwise make your appearance mthrs 
sun m the office ol Ihe Clerk of the Court ol the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit. Lake Coun- 
ty. Illinois, on or betore December 7, 1998. a (rial may be held and (udgment may be 
entered against you lor the relief prayed in the Complaint 

Sally D Coffelt , 198A2247AN 

James S Levi November 6. 1998 

Hodges. Loizzi. Eisenhammer Rodick & Kohn November 13, 1998 

3030 Salt Creek Lane. Suite 202 November 20. 1998 

Arlington Heights. Illinois 60010 



I 





( 




^nc/ia-n/ei 







Be among Uw first lo see the magic of the Festival of Trees. 

Wednesday, November 18, 1998 ♦ 6-9 p.m. 
at Midlane Country Club 

4555 Yorklmust: Kotid, Warlswurlh. Illinois 

Cost: $20 per person, fnriurfes mv, mma mnmA Wmj&faift m ita- rwm,/ „( 

Trees. TICKETS BY ADVANCE PURCHASE ONLY. Limits mil „[, (;r ;iv „i| ilh | )( 

ft See Ihe celebrity Iree lighting ceremony thai begins Ihe four-dnv 

Festivul of Trees celeb ml ion. 
ir Take advantage of your only opportunity lo purchase 

beautifully decorated trees and wreaths. 
<r Enjoy delicious refreshments while you browse through a forus! 

of over 50 decorated trees, meet the designers, visit the Enchanted 

Village of gift and craft shops and more. 

Call (847) 360-4248 for information and tickets. 

Sponsored by the Victory Hospital Foundation to benefit 

women's health services at Victory's surgical centers in 

Undenhurst and Wbukcgan. 



Festival 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS" Steven Olsen 

Transit 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 37783 N. 
Fairfield Rd.. Lake Villa, IL 6004B- 
(847)356-9528. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Steven A. Olsen, 37783 N. Fairfield 
Rd., Lake Villa, IL 60046. (847)356- 
9528. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify lhat the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct Ihe above named 
business from the locatlon(s) indicated 
and that Ihe true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/Sleven A. Olsen, October 26. 1998 
The foregoing instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness Ihis 28lri day of October, 1998. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Karen A. Kerley 

Notary Public 

Received. October 28. 1998 

Wiliard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1198A-2231LV 

November 6, 1998 

November 13, 1998 

November 20, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE. 
ASSUMED BUSINESS ' 

NAMEAPPUCATION ' 

NAME OF BUSINESS:Tha Written 
Word 

AODRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY; 772 No. 
Beck Road, Undenhurst, IL 60046. 
(847)265-2306. ';■-'-.. ? 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS (ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING; CONDUCT-- 
INQ OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Albert Chin-A- Young, 772 No. Beck 
Road. Undenhurst, IL 60046. 
(&47)265-2306. 
STATE OF 1LUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) . 

This la to certify lhat the undersigned . 
miond(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location [s) Indicated 
and that the true or real full namo(s) ol 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
iransacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/Albert Chin- A- Young, October 19, 
1998. 

The foregoing instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 9th day of October, 1998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/lvette M. Diaz 
Notary Public 
Received: October 19, 1998 
Wiliard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
1098E-2219-LV/LN 
October 30, 1998 
November 6, 199B 
November 13, 1998 



; ' 



PUBUC NOTICE 

EMMONS GRADE SCHOOL 

DISTRICT NO. 33 24226 W. BEACH GROVE ROAD 

MATHIAS M. TABAR, SUPERINTENDENT ANTIOCH, ILUNOIS 60002.2299 

CYNTHIA M. VANDRUSH, PRINCIPAL PHONE 847-395-1 105 

FAX 847-395-1223 

Emmons school today announced Its policy for and free" milk for those 

sludents unable to pay under the Illinois Special Milk Programs. The following house- 
hold size and income criteria will be used for determining eligibility: 
ILUNOIS INCOME GUIDEUNES 
(Effective from July 1 , 1 998. to June 30, 1 999) 



Size 




FREE 






Annual 


Month 


Week 


1 


$10,465 


$673 


$202 


2 ' 


14.105 


1,176 


272 


3 


17,745 


1,479 


342 


4 


21,385 


1,783 


412 


5 


25.025 


2,086 


482 


6 


28.665 


2.389 


552 


7 


32.305 


2,693 


622 


8 


35.945 


2.996 


692 


Each Additional 








Family Member Add 


+3,640 


+304 


+70 



Children from households that meet Federal guidelines are eligible tor free milk. 
Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. 
To apply tor free milk benefits, household must complete the attached application as 
soon as possible, sign it and return it to the school. Additional copies of the applica- 
tion just complete the attached application as soon a3 possible, sign it and return it lo 
the school. Addilional copies of Ihe application form are available form are available 
at the principal's office in each school. Households should answer all applicable ques- 
tion on Ihe lorm. An application which does not contain all the required inlormation can- 
not be processed and approved by the school, The required Information is as follows: 
FOOD STAMP/TANF HOUSEHOLDS: Households lhat curranlly receive food 
stamps or "Temporary Assistance For Needy Families" (TANF) for their chlld(ren)'s 
name and food slamp or TANF case number and sign ihe application. Link card num- 
ber cannot be used. 

ALL OTHER HOUSEHOLDS: If a household's income is at or below the level 
shown on (he income scale, children are eligible lor free milk. Households must pro- 
vide the loiiowing inlormation: (1) the names of all household members. (2) Ihe Social 
Security number of the adult household member signing the application, or the word 
none il the adull does nol have a Social Security number, (3) the amount of income 
each household member received last month and where it comes from (wages, child 
support, etc.). and (4) the signature ol an adull household member. 

The inlormation on ihe application may be verified by 6chool or other otlicials al any 
lime during the school year. 

II income Information is provided and children are approved for free milk benelits. 
households must tell the school when their household income Increases by $50 or 
more per month ($600 per year) or when their household size decreases. If a food 
slamp or TANF case number was listed, the household must tell the school when they 
no longer receive lood stamps or TANF for their child. 

Households may appiy for benefits at any lime during the school year. Households 
that are not eligible now but have a decrease in household Income, an increase in 
household size, or have a household member that becomes unemployed should fill 
out an application al that time. 

In certain cases foster children are eligible tor free milk benefits regardless of Ihe 
household income. Households that have foster children living with them and wish to 
apply tor free milk benefits for them should complete Ihe application. 

Households dissatisfied with the ruling ot Ihe official may wish to discuss it with the 
school. Households also have the right to a fair hearing. This can be done by calling 
or writing ihe following official: Matt Tabar 

Superintendent 
24226 W. Beach Grove Road 
847-395-1105 
In the operation of Child Nutrition Programs, no child will be discriminated against 
because ot race, color, nalionol origin, age, sex or handicap. II you believe you have 
been discriminated against, writo immediately to the Secretary ot Agriculture, Wash- 
ington. DC. 20250. 

1198A-2234-AN 
November 6, 1998 



HO BACI 1§UW 







Call Lakeland Newspaper's 
Circulation Dept at 

(847) 223-8161 



I i 



it- 






l«»-}ij«-» , *" a ' Ui1 *-^— ^''-•''■i" „_.„~S.^< v 1 .'"i™!.— a'" rf™^*^™:' -V-oiU •<*.'-* M* I **."'* J, "' 1 J*^jJ 



;-;v/>:^-,: 



November 6, 1998 



COMMUNITY 



?A;'?fe'-- ' - ■ • - ""■■ - : '■'■'■■ '" 



Lakeland Newspape0fift 3 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Jurors and juvenile crime were 
the focus of remarks by Raymond J. 
McKoskl, Chief Judge of the I9th Ju- 
dicial Circuit, at a recent meeting of 
die Antioch Rotary Club. 

Judges of the judicial circuit have 
published a pamphlet for employers 
to help them better understand the 
role of jurors and their participation 
in trials. 

McKoskl described differences 



of juvenile case work today, com- 
pared to earlier decades. .. ;-; 

Jury Services Appreciation Week In 
the 19th Judicial Circuit It Is an op- 
portunity to express appreciation to 
jurors for the services they give to the 
.democratic process. ' 

McKoskl said that the judicial 
system could not function without 
them coming in to serve. "We do ap- 
predate all the service of jurors." 

Of 19,000 people annually called 
to serve on a jury, only 6,600 actual- 



ly serve as jurors. The average trial by 
jurylasts 2.5 days. . 

The pam"pWet : states that re- 
quests to postpone service are con- 
sidered on an individual basis. There 
is an employer Information line: 847- i 
360-6341. 

Back In the 1970s, one judge as- 
signed to a juvenile case load re- \ 
called that he had one case In his two 
years as a juvenile judge that in- 
volved a gun. Today, the juvenile 
case load Is dramatically different . 

According to McKoskl, there are 



juveniles in detention this month for." was aimed at someone), robbery (by ' ■ 
aggravated sexual assault, aggravat- an 1 1-year-old), arsons, attempted 
ed battery, aggravated discharge of a ^m ag- 

firearm (which means that the gun gravated battery to a sdioo^ 



U-19 Lindenhurst Power tie Spepd 0-0 



The Lindenhurst Power drove 
down the road to take on the Lake 
Forest Speed and returned home 
with a 0-0 tie. Despite out-shooting 
Lake Forest and controlling the play 
for most of the game, the Power was 
unable to dent the Lake Forest net 

The offensive hustle of Teri 



LaRoche and Jamie Wismer resulted 
in several shots that, all went just 
inches wide, and Sarah Richardson 
sent a hard shot off the cross bar. 

Several non-calls failed to yield 
any penalty kick opportunities for 
the Power, while also giving Lake 
Forest several breakaway opportuni- 



ties on the other end of the field. 
Kristina Giangiorgi made 14 saves, 
two of them on point blank break- 
aways, to earn the shutout Jenny 
Barbara, Christy Plotz and Kristen 
Gamlin headed up the defensive ef- 
fort The Power is now 11-7-2 on the 
season. 



SCAMPS GYMNASTICS 



Oshkosh Invite 
Levels 

7/8 year olds 

Jennifer Evans-All around score 
323, 7th place; Vault 835, 5th; Bars- 
7.4; Beam-7.85; Floor-8.7, 5th. 

Jackie Jones-All around score 
32. L; Vault 835; Bars 7.9; Beam 6.925; 
Floor 8.925, 4th. 

Lana Boone-All around score 
31.25; Vault 8.3, 6th; Bars 7.1; Beam 
8.0; Floor 7.85. 

Heidi Oechler-All around score 
31.15; Vault 8.6, 3rd; Bars 7.5; Beam 
7.45; Floor 7.6. 

Danielle Rivera-All around 
score 29.5; Vault 7.85; Bars 7.55; 
Beam 6.35; Floor 7.75. 

'Ashlioo Arroguin-All around 

score 29.025; Vault 7.45; Bars 7.75; 
Beam 5.85; Floor 7.975. 

Katie Lopes-All around score 
28.95; Vault 6.45; Bars 7.95; Beam 
6.75; Floor 7.8 

Katie Marran-rAll around score 



2625; Vault 6.85; Bars 5.6; Beam 7.05; 
Floor 6.75. 

Jessica Hmcar-All around score 
26.2; Vault 7.0; Bars 7.0; Beam 6.45; 
Floor 5.75. 

9 year old 

Megan Steinmetz-All around 
score 35.75, 3rd place; Vault 8.8, 4th; 
Bars 9.15, 4th; Beam 9.1, 1st; Floor 
8.7, 10th. 

Michelle Komder-AU around 
score 33.0, 7th place; Vault 8.6, 7th; 
Bars 8.4; Beam 7.55; Floor 8.45. 

Katie Chase-All around score 
31.225; Vault 7.65; Bars 7.85; Beam 
7.7; Floor 8.025. 

10 year old — 

Heather Meredith-All around 
score 35.5, 2nd place; Vault 8.55, 3rd; 
Bars 9.3, 2nd; Beam 8.625, 4th; Floor 
8,925, 8th, 

Kally Best-All around score 
34.65, 3rd place; Vault 8.15; Bars 8.7, 
7th; Beam 8.85, 1st; Floor 8.95, 7th.- 



Junior Sequoits basketball 
tryouts set for Nov. 8, 15th 



Samantha Brinkman-All 

around score 34.6, 4th place; Vault 
8.45, 5th; Bars 8.5, 12th; Beam 8.7, 
3rd; Floor 8.95, 7th. 

Alyssa McQuestion-AU around 
score 33.525, 12th place; Vault 8.15; 
Bars 8.4, 14th; Beam 855, 7th; Floor 
8.425. 

Katie Simon-All around score 
33.975, 8th place; Vault 83, 9th; Bars 
8.6, 10th; Beam 83, 11th; Floor B.775. 

Leslee Bailey-All around score 
33.05; Vault 7.9; Bars 8.60, 11th; 
Beam 7;90; Floor B.65. 

llyearold 

Sara Blinten-All around score 
35.675, 1st place; Vault 8.55, 5th; Bars 
9.50, 1st; Beam 8.75, 3rd; Flobr8.875, 
4th. 

13 year old and up 

Sarah Heinzen-Ali around score 
35.35, 2nd place; Vault 8.55, 6th; 
Bars 9.05, 9th; Beam 8.625, 3rd; 
Floor 9.125, 3rd. 

Becky Geyer-All around 
score-34.225, 8th place; Vault 8.6, 
4th; Bars 9.05, 10th; Beam 8.175, 
9th; Floor 8.4. 



The Antioch Junior Sequoits bas- 
ketball program will hold tryouts for 
the 6th, 7th, and 8th grade boys 
teams for the 1999 season on Nov. 8 
and Nov. 15. at Antioch Upper Grade 
School, Antioch. 

Players MUST RESIDE IN THE 
ANTIOCH HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

Play begins in late January and 
continues through March. Player fee 
for the season is $125. Interested 
players should attend both tryouts. 



Parent or guardian must accompany 
all interested participants to the first 
session. 

Tryout times are as follows: 

6th grade- 1 to 230 p.m., Nov. 8 
and 15 

7th grade-3 to 4:30 p.m., Nov. 8 
and 15 

8th grade-6 to 6:30 p.m., Nov. 8 
and 15. 

Call Jim Kinney at 356-8089 for 
additional information. 




BARK V TOWN 
KENNELS 



Boarding 




• Grooming • Pet Supplies 
Toys & Bones for Your 'Best Friends' 

27607 W. Brandenburg Rd. 
Ingleskte 

(815) 385-0632 



HoreMWF 
8 am.- e tun. 

T.ThjSfi: 
Sam.. Noon 




•^cdG© LKB[pmM8(Mffl: 








Dear Friends, 

Thanks for the support" and friendship 
given to me this past year during my 
run for State Representative in the 



62nd District. 



Gratefully, 
Timothy H. Osmond 

Paid for by Citizens for Osmond, 




. -- - . , - .-•-..-■. 




Delivered to your 
friends, clients^ 
relatives, and 
loyal patrons. 






Call for free brochure 



(847) 265-6352 



M A (Comer of Rt. 45 & Sand Lake Rd. 
*«gT 1 mile N. of Rt. 132, 
& DNt Nursery 2 mites W. of Guitioo Mills) 



DUX 



38 A 



ardei 






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DO YOU LOVE 

Local daycare/prisschool 



looking for qualified 
teachers, aids, after 




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Learning Centei^ 
847-fc6^0850 Wr Wore 
xinf^hiation* 




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OIL CHANGE 

5 Qts. of Oil, Oil Filter 




Coupon Expires 11/30/98 



Most Vehicles 




WINTER 
CHECK-UP 

Check Brakes, Belts, 

Hoses, Battery Coolant, 

Rotate Tires 

Coupon Expires 11/30/98 



N.R.F. AUTO & 
TRUCK REPAIR 



All Makes, Models & Sizes 
RVs, Motor Homes, Medium & Heavy Thick {Repair 
23392 W. Apollo Ct. 
(Rt. 83, South of Grass Lake Rd.) W 
Lake Villa, I L 60046 




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A14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



iVi • •* v.-.w* •% 

COMMUNITY 



■ ■ - -,■■ r.V.r- 

November 6, 1998 





Oakland Summer Readers 



There was a total of 141 students who participated in the Oakland School Summer Reading Club. 
Representatives from each classroom received special acknowledgment from the FTO for their ef- 
forts Third graders in the back row from left; Aaron Dreyer, Joshua Beckman, Sean McDermott, 
Ronald Herout, Richard Gibson. Row three: Second graders Ian Tune, Sam Mackie, Robert Buxton, 
Jonathan Wade. Row two: First graders Sara Knupp, Megan Palmer, Danile Hittenmiller, Cameron 
jerina. Front row: kindergartners Jessica Liszka, Joshua Pohlman. Larry Mondie contributed 
coupons for each child who participated in the Oakland and Petty Schools Summer Reading Pro- 
gram. Students can redeem the certificates for a fee donut from Antioch Dunkin Donuts or a free 
video rental from Video Empire in Antioch. 



Wetland sanctuary seminar 
highlights education use 



« 740-4035 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Volunteers turned out to learn 
and work at die William I:. Brook 
Wetland Sanctuary and Entertain- 
ment Center on Saturday. Oct. 10. 

It is the first public education 
event at the developing downtown 
sanctuary area. Informal events and 
Arbor Day observances by the village 
have been held during previous sea- 
sons to plant trees in the area. 

A similar workshop and seminar 
is planned for next Spring, according 
to village officials. 

Between 50 and 75 people 
turned out for the field seminar and 
workshop session conducted by Or. 
John Larson of Applied Fxological 
Services, Inc. 

"Dr. John Larson gave an excel- 
lent talk on the background of the 
history of our wetlands, the clean- 
up, the restoration, and then the in- 
vasive species of plants and bushes," 
said Claude LeMere, community de- 
velopment director. 

Parents, children, and scout 
troops later worked on the site to 
clear invasive species. 

"An important pari of the wet- 
lands is involvement with the 
schools and parents," he said. It pro- 
vides a wetland education area that 
can teach how wetlands work and 
survive. 

"The spring (seminar and work- 
shop) will involve planting of aquat- 
ic and upland vegetation," LeMere 
said. "The wetlands are a garden you 
plant in the Spring. It must remain 
undisturbed while it regenerates it- 
self." 

The wetland sanctuary area is 



Food pantry 
meeting Monday 



not expected lo be a passive recre- 
ation experience all year round, A 
boardwalk now under construction 
will provide access during the grow- 
ing seasons. 

"Once the boardwalks and walk- 
ing paths are completed, those will 
be the only areas that wil! be open to 
foot traffic." 

"The other portion of the wet- 
land will avail itself, during the win- 
ter when it is dormant, as a recre- 
ational facility," LeMere said. Frozen 
ponds will provide skating areas. 

"So, basically, we are giving to 
the wetlands, during the growing 
season, the peace and serenity that is 
required for this natural filtering sys- 
tem lo rejuvenate itself. And the wet- 
lands will give back to us, when it is 
dormant, a wonderful winter recre- 
ation area." 

The William E. Brook Wetland 
Sanctuary and Entertainment Center 
is at Orchard Street and Skidmore 
Street, 



Library presents 
Laura Ingalls 
Wilder program 

Laura Ingalls Wilder is the focus 
of a presentation at the Antioch Pub- 
lic Library District on Saturday, Nov. 
7 at 2 p.m. in the library's meeting 
room. 

This event was previously re- 
ported incorrectly by the Antioch 
News as occurring on Nov. 2. 

Amateur Wilder enthusiast 
Elaine Billeck will present a talk 
about the life and lore of the popular 
children's author. She will be bring- 
ing a model of the Ingalls' home- 
stead. 

The program is for the whole 
family and all ages are welcome to 
attend. 

Sign -up for the program can be 
done in person or by telephone, 847- 
395-0874. 




Talking 
Health 

by Dr. Scott Reiser, D.C. 



HOW TO BUILD UP YOUR BONES 



g Antioch Food Pantry volunteers 
will host their annual meeting Mon- 
day, Nov. 9 at 9:30 a.m. at Wesley 
Hall, United Methodist Church of 
;Antioch, 848 Main Street, Antioch. 

People who would like to volun- 
;teer to assist are invited to attend this 
'meeting.* 

Further information Is available 
from Lisa Herout at 847-395-7032. 



Osteoporosis is a condition thai can dis- 
figure and disable women, but much can 
be done to prevent il. Most of us arc 
aware that calcium "builds strong 
bones", and have some idea that enough 
dietary calcium and/or calcium supple- 
ments will reduce bone porosity, while 
both dietary and supplemental calcium 
arc important, other nutritional consider- 
ations are equally significant. 

The high phosphorous conienl of meals 
encourages bone loss, so women should 
consider reducing their consumption of 
animal protein and substituting grain, 
vegetable, and dairy proteins. High fiber 
intake can cause calcium to pass unab- 
sorbed through the system. This does not" 
mean eliminating fiber from the diet, but 
it Is important to take calcium supple- 
ments apart from high fiber meals. And 
both coffee and alcohol greatly increase 
the risk of osteoporosis. 
Along with diet, exercise is the most 



important way lo combat osteoporosis. 
Any physical activity that places stress 
on the long bones, thus increasing their 
mass, is excellent, such as jogging, high- 
impact aerobics, hiking, even walking. 
Ask your chiropractor for measures 
Which guarantee good general health and 
also combat osteoporosis. 

If maintaining your health and reduc- 
ing stress is important to you. call Round 
Lake Beach Chiropractic at 847-740- 
2800 to make an initial, no obligation 
consultation with Dr. S<{o}t G. Reiser. 
Our clinic is located at 314 Rollins Road, 
Round Lake Beach (Eagle Creek Plata - 
corner of Cedar Lqkt and Rollins 
Roads.} - - Tr | ? g 



NOVEMBER 
"FOOD FOR THE. HUNGRY" 







mitigate 



By SPENCER SCHEIN 
Staff Reporter 

The Fox Waterway Agency 
Board of Directors is planning to 
discuss ways to mitigate a prob- 
lem the U.S. Army Corps of Engi- 
neers has with the agency. 

Executive Director Ingrid R. 
Enriquez said she is currently 
working on ways to repair the sit- 
uation and have the agency's 10- 
year maintenance dredging per- 
mit returned. 

The permit has been on hold 
since Sept. 25, when the agency 
voluntarily stopped work on a 
dredging project in a channel 
near the Gary Country Club on 
Route 14. Enriquez said they 
stopped the project after learning 
there were no permits to do the 
work. 

Project Manager Roy Gun- 
delach was fired by the agency's 
board the day before, and the 
agency is continuing to look for a 
replacement. 

The agency has a contract 
with homeowners along the Mil- 
dred Avenue channel to have the 
channel width at a maximum 25 
feet, she said. 

The project was expanding it 
to 30 feet, and was sculpting the 
steep channel banks from their 
natural 45-60 degree angles to a 
steep 90-degree angle, Enriquez 
said. 

"This area is very steep," she 
said. "As they were widening the 







1 



channel, the walls started to cave - . 
in," she said. ■, . . #* 

The Corps has agreed to allow 
the agency to perform two 
three projects from a list of five:!' 
provided by the Corps, Instead of ; 
paying a heavy fine. • ; rf; 

"The Corps is willing to work 
with us on mitigation," Enriquez :; 
said. "Our permit is on hold, it-4: 
will not be revoked." The agency)? 
received its 10-year permitin Oc- 
tober of 1996. 

The agency's board is holding 
a Committee of the Whole meet- 
ing Thursday, Nov. 5, at 6 p.m. at 
the agency offices in Fox. Lake, to 
discuss the two major viola- 
tions—dredging outside the 
scope of the agency's permit with 
the Corps and placing fill In the 
mouth of the Fox River. 

The Mildred Avenue channel 
extends 1,200 feet inland from the 
west bank of the Fox River. 

As far as the Gary project is 
concerned, the agency needs to 
submit an after-the-fact permit 
for the work already completed, 
and a new permit for the work 
that needs to be completed, En- 
riquez said. 

That should take about a 
months time to do, at which point 
the repair work should start, and 
be completed in about one 
month and a half's time, she said. 

"Even under the best of cir- 
cumstances, this channel would 
be quite difficult to dredge," she ■ 
said. '*•* 



Niemi gallery show tMiiiv6ekend- 

Gallery hours on Saturday are 
from3 to 8 p.m. and on Sunday from 
2 to 5 p.m. During the week, galleryr 
hours are 1 to 5 p.m. 

Additional information is avail- 
able at 847-265-2343. 

The.gallery is located at 39370 , 
North Route 59 In Lake Villa. . 



Niemi Fine Art gallery will host 
an opening Saturday and Sunday, 
Nov. 7 and 8. 

The Gallery will feature sculp- 
tures by Fritz Olsen, of Michigan, 
Kevin Robb, of Colorado, C. T. 
Whitehouse, of Colorado, and Bruce 
A. Niemi. 



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PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice of Proposed Property Tax Increase 

for Antioch Community High School 

I. * A public hearing to approve a proposed prop- 
erty tax levy increase for Antioch Community High 
School No. 1 17 for 1998 will be held on November 
17, 1998 at 7:30 P.M. at B.J. Hooper School, 240Q 
East Sand Lake Road, Lindenhurst, IL 60046. 

Any person desiring to appear at the public 
hearing and present testimony to the taxing disf 
! trict may contact William C. Ahlers, Business 
Manager, 1133 Main Street, Antioch, IL 60002, 
(847)395-1421. \ 

The corporate and special purpose property 
; taxes extended or abated for 1997 were 
$11,274,128.16. I 

The proposed corporate and special purpose, 
property taxes to be levied for 1998 are 
$12,568,797.00. This represents an 11.48 percent 
j Increase over the previous year. 

The property taxes extended for debt service 
I and public building commission leases for 1997 
| were $0.00. 

The estimated property taxes to be levied for 
debt service and public building commission leas- 
es for 1998 are $0.00. This represents a 0.00 per- 
cent Increase over the previous year, 
IV. me total property taxes extended or abated I 
i M 1997 were $1 1 ,274>1 28/1 6.* i 

The estimated total property taxes to be levied I 
for 1998 are $12,568,797.00. This represents an 
1 1 .48 percent increase over the previous year. 

1198A-2236-AN/LN/LVI 
November 6, 1998 



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A16 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



November 6, 1991 



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There's a store in 
Mundclcin called Cash 
Converters, and for more 
than a year now it has been 
performing ils "magic.' 1 
Cash Converters is an 
international business (now 
in 25 countries with more 
than 500 stores) and as 
the name implies, it con- 
verts your unwanted items 
into cash. Best of all, the 
store performs its magic 
right on the spot. Walk in 
with that old TV, stereo, or 
breadmaker, and walk out 
with cash. 

This store, as noted by 
the Franchisees, Gail and 
Bob Brodsky, fills the gap 
for those who don't want 
to bother with a garage 
sale and those who just 
don't know how or where 
to sell that certain item. 
With Cash Converters, 
there's none of the garage 
sale hassles-the cost of 
advertising, pricing your 
items, strangers at your 



home, and the time you 
spend attending to these 
details. 

Says Gail, u Our cus- 
tomers are happy to know 
that they have not only an 
outlet for the items that 
they no longer want, but a 
means to help pay for a 
new one. We understand 
that coming to a store like 
ours is a new experience 
for most people, and we 
work to make them feel 
extra comfortable ." 

It must be working since 
Cash Converters has an 
incredibly high number 
of repeat customers. 

Cash Converters buys all 
types of electronic items, 
computers, cameras, musi- 
cal instruments, small 
kitchen appliances, sport- 
ing goods, tools, and car 
audio systems. Price is no 
object-the store buys it! 

Of course, the merchan- 
dise the store buys is then 
sold at the store. How can 



you be sure the item you're 
buying is in good working 
order? Cash Converters has 
a 30-day guarantee on its 
merchandise, so you're 
covered. Customers are 
able to buy quality items 
at a fraction of the original 
cost, and they may take 
advantage of the store's 
layaway plan. 

Cash Converters' stores 
have become quite an 
attraction. "We have many 
folks who come in just to 
see the amazing assortment 
of items we have," says 
Bob Brodsky. "With such a 
constantly changing inven- 
tory, our customers want to 
see what's new since the 
last time they visited." 

If you're looking to buy 
something and Cash 
Converters doesn't have it, 
Gail, Bob, and their staff 
will keep an eye open for 
the item and contact you 
when they get it. 
Cash Converters is locat- 



- 



ed in Townline Shopping 
Center at the intersection 
of Routes 45 (Lake Street) 
and Route 60 (Townline 
Road) right next to the 
Jewel-Osco. The store is 
open every day, including 
Monday through Friday 
from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., 
Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 
6 p.m., and Sunday from 
noon to 5 p.m. 

There also are Cash 
Converters in Hoffman 
Estates, Prospect Heights, 
and DesPlaines, IL and 
Seattle, Boston, London, 
Paris, and other cities 
around the world. For more 
information, please call 
(847)837-1100. 

Infotorial 



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HEALTHWATCH 

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MOVIE REVIEW 

John Caipehter* f^iiplres' j 1 N^i?; 
is a 'dead' experience / B6 



KiBUC UBRARY DISTR 1 1 



7&7N. Main Street 
AntiocrvJL 60002 

I Section 

1 







Gurnee baker turns homemade goodies 
into home-based business 



By KORRINA GROM 
Staff Reporter 



er home is a dessert-lover's heaven. 
The enticing aroma of fresh-baked 
cookies floats through the air, while 
chocolate -covered pretzels adorn the 
kitchen table. 



You've just entered the home of 
"Just Desserts" owner Carol Senter, 
who attends culinary school at the 
Cooking and Hospitality Institute of 
» Chicago (CHIC). 

Senter, who grew up in Liber- 
! tyville, operates a baking company 
Cj out of her Gumee home, making six 

■ '■ different kinds of cheesecake, as 
\ \ well as an array of cookies, stnidels, 

"arid tarts. She said her talent for 
\ baking comes from her mother, 

■ • Marianne Napoleoni. 
I'M* t"My mother made unbellev- 

CaroiSeo^who.'r^^^ J ^S±M^S Stef ' 

•Gun^horrijBlbakes spiced pecans/m 

_.najrnph'and ; !egg-whitesp to be sold In a gift basket.— Photo by senter's sister also baked, often 

"iner for employees, and gave Senter 



many of the recipes she now uses. 

Senter enjoyed baking while 
working for Baxter as a legal secre- 
tary, often bringing her creations to 
work. She has been making cheese- 
cakes for 15 years, which she always 
brought to dinner parties. 

"People kept telling me that the 
cheesecakes were really good," Sen- 
ter said. "They said 1 should sell 
them." 

The need to stay home with her 
two young children inspired Senter 
to begin her baking business. 

"So many people are so set on 
making their fortunes that they miss 
out on the Important things/ Senter 
said. "I decided to start this business 
so I could stay home with my kids 



and use the knowledge I learned 
from attending culinary school." 

Her business boomed from 
there. While Senter enjoyed making 
free desserts for friends, the baking 
started to cost money. That was 
when Senter decided to begin sell- 
ing her products. 

"If I create a cheesecake for a 
dinner party of eight people, and 
one of those people needs a cheese- 
cake for a party, then my business 
spreads," Senter said, "Word-of- 
mouth has really helped," 

Senter charges $28 for an eight- 
inch round cheesecake, which she 
says is extremely reasonable. 

" I make my cheesecakes so you 
can cut them Into many pieces," 
Senter said. "A single cheesecake 
can be cut Into 30 small pieces." 

After requests from her clients, 
Senter also began making gift bas- 
kets. 

"I use things out of my own 
kitchen, all fresh-baked," Senter \ I 
said.- "I make my own things, and 
that's what sets me apart" 

- She also creates "care packages'* 

Please see TASTE IB4 



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FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 









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It's a weil known fact that you'll see 
some of the most unique holiday trees at the 
Victory Hospital Foundation's 7th Annual 
Festival of Trees, Nov. 18-22, at Midiane 
Country Club, 4555 Yorkhouse Road, 
Wadsworth. But' sure to steal the show is the 
"Beanies, Babies and Bears" tree which will 
be on display In.the festival's Enchanted 
Village gift shoppe. 

Whoever said, "You cant get something for 
nothing" didn't know the folks at the festival. The "Beanies, 
Babies and Bears" tree Is going to be won by someone who 
attends the Festival of Trees. Better yet, the winner wont have 
to spend a dime over the price of admission to win it That's 
because one free raffle ticket for this special "Beanies, Babies 
and Bears" tree will be awarded with each paid admission to 
the 7th Annual Festival of Trees. Extra tickets will be available 
for sale during the festival In the gjft shoppe, lower level of 
Midiane Country Club. 

This unique holiday tree is decorated with a variety of 
Beanie Babies'" bears as well as teddy bears from the Russ 
Berrie™, Ty™ and Gund'" product lines. Topping the tree is 
Sherbert, the popular tie-dyed Pillow Pal'" bear. Among the 



e to steal the scene 

tin-: 





Beanie Babies™ hanging 

out on the tree are 

Princess, Glory, Peace 

and the exclusive Clubby. 
For a chance to win 

this special tree, festival 

goers should fill out their 

tree raffle tickets and 

drop them in the bin 
located in the Enchanted 
Village gift shoppe on the lower level of 
Midiane Country Club. While there, they'll 
notice the shops have a lot to offer 
besides the "Beanies, Babies and Bears" 
tree. 

Nancy Merlock of Beach Park has 
gathered a dazzling array of gifts and household decorations 
from some of the nation's leading holiday product manufactur- 
ers. Her gift shoppe shelves will be filled with fanciful Santas 
and elegant angels, as well as snowmen of every description. 
From centerpieces to tree ornaments, wall hangings to pillows, 
holiday shoppers will find something of interest in the festival's 
gift shoppe. Included in this year's selections are a wide range 




of teacher gifts. Economically priced, 
shoppers will find gift item pricing begins 
at$2. 

The 7th Annual Festival of Trees is 
sponsored by the Victory Hospital 
Foundation to benefit women's health ser- 
vices at Victory's sundry centers in 
Undenhurst and Waukegan. The festival 
will be held from Nov. 19-22 at Midiane 
Country Club, 4555 Yorkhouse Road, 
Wadsworth. General festival admission Is 
$4 for adults and $2 for senior citizens 
and children 12 and under. 

In addition to the fabulous Enchanted 
Village gift shops, the Festival of Trees 
features over 70 designer decorated holi- 
day trees and wreaths, a community tree competition, a bake 
shop filled with tasty holiday treats, dozens of talented enter- 
tainers, and Santa's Workshop of children's activities and 
crafts. 

For more information on the 7th Annual Festival of Trees, 
can 360-4248, Monday through Friday, between 8 and 4:30 
p.m. 



THEATRE 




'Oklahoma!' 

The curtain will rise on Highland 
Park Players' 1 1 th annual musical pro- 
duction, "Oklahoma 1 , " which will be 
presented on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 
13, 14, 20 and 21 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, 
Nov. IS, 22 at 2 p.m. The production 
will take place in the Mlsner 
Auditorium at Central School, 621 
Grove St., Glencoe. 

Tickets ore available at Karger and 
West Ridge Center In Highland Park and 



are $10 In advance and $12 at the door, 
Tickets can also be ordered by calling 
604-4771. 

'Arsenic' auditions 

Village Theatre of Palatine will hold 
auditions Tor "Arsenic and Old Lace" on 
Nov. 15 and 16 at 7:30 p.m. at Cutting 
Hall Theater, 150 E. Wood St., Palatine. 
Cold readings from script. For more 
Information, call Director Solly Moomey 
at 359-7593. 



KIDS EVENTS 

'Explore' classes set 

A variety of classes for junior high 
school students will be offered at the 
next "Explore!" program on Nov. 7 at 
the College of Lake County. Classes 
will be offered between 9 a.m. and 4 
p.m. at the Grayslake campus, 19351 
W. Washington St. 



A "Babysitting Certification" class 
will be offered from 9a ,m. to 3 p.m. 
This is a two-session course approved 
and certified through the American 
Red Cross. The second class will meet 
on Nov. 14. Students must be at least 
1 1 years old to take the course, and 
must attend both sessions to receive 
certification. The cost Is $35. 

Four classes will be offered from 
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. They are 

Please turn tonextpagi 



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B4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Novembers, 1998 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



Shop & Share fund-raiser set 

Pets in Need will hold a Shop & Share fund-rais- 
er on Nov. 16, 17 and 18 at all Jewel Food Stores. 
By shopping at Jewel on one of these days, five per- 
cent of your total purchase will be donated by Jewel 
to the organization. Pets in Need needs help to 
shelter, feed and care for lost, homeless and 
unwanted pets until they are adopted and to raise 
building funds for a new facility. 

Anyone interested in helping Pets in Need by 
shopping at Jewel on those dates will need a "Shop 
& Share Identification Slip" and should contact Pat 
at (815) 728*1462 to obtain a slip before shopping. 
Ash for two so you can pass one on to a friend. 

'Angel Street' opens Nov. 13 

"Angel Street," a Victorian melodrama packed 
with intrigue, mystery and suspense, will be pre- 
sented by the College of Lake County's theatre 
department in November. The play will open at 7:30 
p.m. Nov. 13 in the Studio Theatre of the 



Performing Arts Building on the Grayslake campus. 
The show will be repeated at the same time on Nov. 
14, 19, 20 and 21. 

Based on a book by Patrick Hamilton, "Angel 
Street" was first produced in London under the title 
"Gaslight." It tells the story of the Manninghams of 
Angel Street in the 19th century. Manningham, a 
handsome but sinister man, pretends kindness but 
slowly tortures his gentle, lovely wife into insanity. 
The play takes an intriguing twist as an unexpected 
caller from Scotland Yard convinces Mrs. 
Manningham of her husband's involvement in a 
murder 15 years earlier and, together, they solve 
the mystery in an exciting and shrewd fashion. 

The CLC production is directed by Bbhlln 
Glennon, an English and theater instructor at CLC. 
Set design is by theatre instructor Thomas Mitchell. 
Tickets to the play are $6 for CLC students, alumni 
and seniors age 65 and over and $8 for the general 
public. Call 543-2300 for tickets, visa, MasterCard, 
Discover and American Express are accepted. 



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HOLIDAY EVENTS 




Connie Marie Brazelton of 
NBC-TVs "ER," will be on hand 
at the 7th Annual Festival of 
Trees at Midlane Country Club 
on Nov. 18, at 6 p.m. 

'Night in the Forest' 

loin Conni Marie Brazelton of 
NBC-TVs "ER." al the Victory I lospilal 
Foundation's "first Night in the 
Forest," at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 18 
at Midlane Country Club. 4555 
Yorkhouse Rd„ Wadsworth. This magi- 
cal tree Huhting and preview event 
launches the 7lh Annual Festival of 
Trees, Lake County's holiday tradition. 
"First Night" is the only time to pur- 
chase the tree or wreath of your choice. 
You'll also meet Conni, be among the 
first to delight in the magic of thqfesti- 
val, browse the craft and gift shops, 
enjoy entertainment and partake of 
refreshments. Advanced tickets are $20 
each and also allow one return visit to 
the festival at a later date. For tickets or 
for more Information, call The Victory 
Development Department at 360-4248. 



MUSIC 

Concert series 

The lake ( louniy Community 
Concert Association has revealed an 
e« iline, line-up of world class perform- 
ers lui its IWW-W scries. 

Hie n)9ll-!J9 season includes the fol- 
lowing: Like Forest Symphony 
Orchestra, Saturday, Nov, 14.7:30 p.m.; 
lee U'ssack and Joanne O'llricn—An 
knchanled Evening The Music of 
Broadway. Sunday, Jan. 10, 3 p.m.; Jan 
( ioitlieb lirarek, pianist, Sunday. March 
I'll 3 p.m.; and Vancouver Wind Trio 
ihassnon. oboe and clarinel), Sunday, 
Apnl I H at 3 p.m. 

Tickets are sold only for the entire 
series. Ticket holders are entitled to 
attend eighi additional concerts at two 
other ( immunity (xmccrts locations in 
Arlington I leights and Park Ridge. 

All LCCCA's concerts will be held in 
t trlin Trapp Auditorium at Waukegan 
I ligb School, Brooksidc and McAree. 

For tickets, call Donna Fortney at 
:M4-74(i5. 



DANCE 



Singles dance set 

The Solo Singles Club meets every 
Friday at H p.m. at dale Street Inn, 906 
Diamond Like Ud., Miindelcili. There 
will be live entertainment. The age range 
is 40- plus and admission is free. For 



more information, call the Hotline, at 
746-6818. 




Auditioning for the Barrington 
Youth Dance Ensemble are, 
from left back, Ashley Watson 
and Kelly Cunran, and from left 
front, Rosey LaVine and Katelyn 
Lentz are preparing for the 
ensemble's production of "The 
Nutcracker" in December. 

'Nutcracker' 

The Barrington Youth Ensemble's 
production of The Nutcracker will be held 
on Friday, Dec. 4 at 7:30 p.m. ; Saturday, 
Dec. 5 at 2 and 730 p.m.; and Sunday, 
Dec. 6 at 2 p.m. Performances will be at 
Barrington High School's Richard C 
Johnson Auditorium, 616 W. Main St. For 
more information, call 382-6333. 



FROM PAGE Bl 



THE DISNEY INSTITUTE 
THE ULTIMATE EXPERIENCE 

by JIM WARNKEN, 

Prosldont, North Star Travel,. Inc. 

It may not be for everyone, but if you're one of the thousands of 
"Disncy-iacs" have wc got a vacation for you! 

After years of planning, Disney has come up with a completely new concept 
in vacation resorts Tor those who want more than just an ordinary Disney 
World vacation. 

The totally new Disney Institute, at Walt Disney Resorts in Florida, offers 
visitors an authentic, hands-on, Disney experience. 
I lerc's the setting. 

Imagine a quaint village green with an outdoor amphitheater, cinema, 
performance center, sports and fitness center, spa and user- friendly audio- 
visual sludto workshop tucked away in a tranquil lakeside enclave, alt at the 
edge of an 1 X-holc championship golf course. 
Now let's look al a typical day. 
After breakfast, you stop ny the cinema to watch a Disney "film-in- 
progress" You engage in a conversation with the director who explains 
character development in ihc film. 

Your daughter is busy "creating" in the Animation Workshop while your 
sun is off scaling the heights til the Rockwall al the Fitness cenler. 

Your spouse is off having her golf swing videotaped and analyzed by the 

gull pro: the results of which will he seen later thai afternoon out on ihc course. 

Alter lunch, you stroll over to the culinary studios for your Food Wonders 

of the World session where a masler chef helps you icam to prepare a French 

specially called Mircpoix. 

Later, it's time to relax with a Swedish massage at the spa where any stress 
you may have brought from home soon melts away. 

After dinner, you head to ihc performance center for a musical stage show 
where you, as one of Ihc dozen "artists-in-rcsidcncc", arc a character in Ihc 
slory. 

One thing I found appealing is that you plan your own day. Disney has 
provided something for everyone. Singles, couples and families will all find 
much to interest them, but each visitor can do his own thing. 

The Disney Institute is also designed so each guest gets individual attention, 
thus the number of visitors is very limited. The message here is "book early." 

NORTH ^p^" STAR 

CRUISES 
Lindcnhurst 

wwwnorlh5tartrav8l.com 

(847) 356-2000 



TASTE: Gurnee baker uses 
finest ingredients for goodies 



for parents to send to their chil- 
dren who are away at college. 
Senter said she gets many requests 
for these packages. 

The ingredients Senter uses to 
create her desserts are another 
thing which set her apart from 
your everyday bakery. She uses all- 
natural ingredients while baking. 

"! make everything from 
scratch," Senter said. "For exam- 
ple, I use only butter In my bak- 
ing." 

While butter can run upwards 
of $4.50 per pound, Senter will not 
compromise the taste of her 
desserts by using margarine. 

She also picks her own rasp- 
berries and strawberries that are 
used for her cheesecakes, strudels, 
and tarts. Her raspberries are 
picked from Glunz Farms in 
Grayslake. 

"Raspberries lose their aroma 
24 hours after you pick them," 
Senter said. "Who knows how long 
raspberries at the store have been 
there." 

For nutrition-conscious peo- 
ple, Senter offers the following 
advice. 

"Just eat less," Senter said. 
"Why should we waste calories on 
something mediocre? My cheese- 
cakes, for example, are designed 
for small pieces." 

Senter's 40 clients seem to 
appreciate all the hard work she 
puts into baking her desserts. 
While some are only one-time cus- 
tomers, Senter appreciates it when 
customers call back to buy more. 
Some clients have called Senter to 
bake desserts for parties of 100 or 
more. 

"It's very important for me to 
serve someone a good, quality 
product," Senter said. 

Weather, however, is one thing 
that can compromise a good 

© i 



dessert. Senter said she was bak- 
ing an apple strudel for a party 
several weeks ago. Outside, the 
temperature was 90 degrees, and 
there was 100 percent humidity. 
Too much humidity, Senter said, 
can turn a strudel to mush. 

"Those things panic me," 
Senter said. "I get really anal about 
those things." 

However, through the wonder- 
ful days of baking, and those 
where the weather just won't, 
cooperate, Senter said her hus- 
band John has been 100 percent 
supportive. 

"The whole thing has over- 
whelmed him," Senter said. "But 
he has always been whatever I 
wanted him to be." 

After 14 years of marriage, 
Senter's husband remains the 
"rock" of the house. He helps out 
whenever Senter needs him, and 
Senter said she couldn't do this 
without him. 

"I wish there were hundreds 
more of him so I could introduce 
them to my friends," Senter said, 
with tears in her eyes. "He is a 
truly phenomenal person." 

Support and talent have car- 
ried Senter a long way. Her love 
for what she does has carried her 
even further. 

"We do what works around 
here," Senter said. "It's working for 
us so far." 

For most desserts, Senter 
requires a couple days notice. For 
bigger parties, she requests that 
customers call one to two weeks in 
advance so she can get fresh ingre- 
dients. 

Anyone interested in Crying 
Senter's mouth-watering desserts 
should call her at (847) 336-6335). 

"What I do is unique, with 
home-baked goods," Senter said. 
"And I do bake well." 




JS/A Art Jafre 
Nov. 13th, 14th, 15th W 

Friday 3-9pm * Saturday 10-5pm * Sunday 11 -4pm 

Harper Colleqe m Palatine, Illinois 

Algonquin And Roselle Roads 
I Quilts + Dolls + Bean * Santas * Lamps # Miniature* + Toy* * Clothing *■ Floorcloths 

Original Fine Art * Fish Carvings * Potlery + Stained Glass * Weaving * Furniture 
• Wood Working Baskets + Signs * Wooden Primitives * Seasonal Decor 
L ADMISSION: ADULTS $5-00 * CHILDREN UNDER 1 2 FREE 
£3)^ ^S=- (630)268-8067 -=> / 



<S> 



V^Jf Presents \^M| 

^ Annie Warbucks^\ 

By Thomas Meehan 

Music by Charles Strouse; Lyrics by Martin Charnln 

Permission granted by Music Theatre International 

Directed by GIGi Wllldlng 

November 20, 21 , 27, 28 

December 4, 5, 11, 12 

November 22, 29, Dec. 6, 13 

Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.; Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10; Students & Seniors $0 

Call for Reservations 395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St., Antloch 

Box Office Opens November 9 

MB« Bo« Ollico Hours Mon (hru Thur« 5:30-7:30 p.m : Sol. 1 1 -2 Mr*« 
ImSU I 1/2 h.s boloie snowlimu. Rosorvod Sootino VISA/MC iGrHl 



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November 6, 1998 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



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Lakeland Newspapers/ 



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If you haven't had a chance to 
go see It yet, you may want to 
catch "What Dreams May 
Come" In the movie theaters 
before Its run Is over. Whatever your 
tastes are, it is a feast for the eyes, 
and you will leave the theater think- 
ing about what heaven and hell 
means to you. 

Which is exactly what I did, be- 
cause the movie's premise is that 
you will experience "heaven" and 
"hell" as an extension of your own 
dreams and/or nightmares. Of 
course, if you're like Robin Williams, 
the star of the film, you'll dream up 
a really cool heaven that looks like a 
magnificent painting, literally drip- 
ping with beauty. 

I, on the other hand, am probably 
not yet in touch with my inner "artis- 
tic self," because I would have a hard 
time enjoying a heaven full of drip- 
ping paint I'd be wondering just 
what kind of laundry detergent I'd 
need to get that stuff out of my 
clothes. Not to mention the nasty 
footprints it would leave on the floors 
of my house. And I certainly wouldn't 
want my children with me in that sort 
of place - the finger-painting possibil- 
ities would give me nightmares. 

Still, it's fun to imagine what 
kind of place my "heaven" might be 
like. Or my "hell," just in case; 

This could be my heaven: 

1. My "house" resembles a fairy 
tale cottage, built on land that over- 
looks the Pacific ocean, landscaped 



Ed Hall's 
Woodstock 
Guitar Night 

Six highly accomplished musi- 
cians will appear in concert at the 
Woodstock Opera House for Ed Hal- 
l's Woodstock Guitar Night. The 
concert will be on Saturday, Nov. 28, 
beginning at 8 p.m. 

Edgar Cruz from Oklahoma City, 
Okla., is best known for his unusual 
arrangements for fingerstyle guitar. 
"Tequila," "Wipe Out," "Live and Let 
Die," and Queens, "Bohemian Rhap- 
sody" are a few of the arrangements 
in his repertoire. Cruz is also an ac- 
complished classical guitarist. 

Don Stiemberg is a mandolin 
virtuoso from Skokie. Don is a pro- 
tege of the late great mandolinist 
Jethro Bums, spending many hours 
as a partner, accompanist and 
friend. Stiemberg is one of the most 
sought after musicians in the Mid- 
west for studio work, and performs 
with many bands. Don will be ac- 
companied by the great jazz gui- 
tarist John Parrott. 

Jeff Friedlander from Evanston 
won the Telluride Bluegrass Festival 
fingerstyle guitar contest and the 
Gamble Rogers Music Festival fin- 
gerstyle guitar contest, His guitar 
work enhances his original compo- 
sitions and fine singing voice. 

Eric Lugosch won the National 
Fingerpicking Championship in 
19B5 and is an accomplished com- 
poser and technician for fingerstyle 
guitar. From Chicago, Lugosch is 
known for his fine arrangements of 
Reverend Gary Davis blues music 
and ragtime. 

Ed Hall from Harvard, won the 
National Fingerpicking Guitar 
Championship in 1991 and is a noted 
arranger, teacher and composer of 
fingerstyle guitar music; is your host. 

Tickets for Ed Hail's Woodstock 
Guitar Night are $15 and are on sale 
at the Woodstock Opera House box 
office. For tickets or more informa- 
tion, call (815) 338-5300. - 




LIFE'S 
A BEAR 

DonnaAbear 



with beautiful rose and tulip gar- 
dens, and surrounded by a forest of 
Douglas fir and oak trees, where 
deer, rabbits and other gentle crea- 
tures from Disney movies roam. 
There are no bees, spiders, ricks, 
mosquitoes, or telephone solicitors. 

2. My husband is wearing 
something other than jeans and a 
flannel, is bored with TV and fishing 
and keeps surprising me with gifts - 
that I actually like. 

3. I call my mother and ask 
"How are you?" and she says, 
"Fine." 

4. A major studio is doing a re- 
make of "77ie Wizard of Of, I wrote 
the script, and they want me to play 
the Wicked Witch of the West (my 



dream role). 

5. The NBA lockout is over, Jor- 
dan and the rest are back, and I 
have front-row season tickets. 

6. I have household help: 
there's Mel Gibson, my personal 
secretary; John Travolta, my dance 
instructor; Tom Cruise, my bar- 
tender; Michael Jordan, my person- 
al trainer; Arnold Schwarznegger, 
my nanny, Corky Abear, my house- 
keeper (hey - no one cleans like my 
mother- in- law), and last but not 
least - my chef, Paul Newman. 

7. I'm thin (who wouldn't be, 
with a chef who only makes 
spaghetti sauce and vinegar and oil 
salad dressing). 

8. My husband and I take ro- 
mantic trips together to other coun- 
tries, where they love tourists, fish- 
ing has been outlawed, and they 
speak a language other than, "Ya, 
heydere." 

9. My children, when they 
aren't making me cute little cards, 
are playing outside in our backyard, 
together, without fighting, and they 



have a limited vocabulary - "Yes, 
Mom" and "Please play one of your 
Bonnie Raitt CDs • and sing along 
loud enough for us to hear you." 
10. The only phone calls I get 
are from the Pulitzer people, Oprah, 
and the Publisher's Clearinghouse 
prize patrol. 

If this Is hell, 
count me out: 

1. The phone never stops ring- 
ing and every time I answer it, 
there's a strange voice that says, 
"Can I speak to Mrs,.Abeer?" 

2. I receive the same two pieces 
of mail every day - one is an audit 
notice from the IRS, and the other is 
a form rejection letter from a pub- 
lishing house. 

3. My children have a limited 
vocabulary: "What's for dinner?" 
and "I know you are, but what am I?" 

4. There are only two channels 
on TV - one showing reruns of the 
0. J. Simpson trial, and the other 
showing "The Best of Jerry 
Springer." 



5. I call my mother on the 
phone, and when I say "How are 
you?", she tells me. In detail. 

6. Whenever I try to drive my 
car, I find myself behind a sport util- 
ity vehicle driven by a man with a 
short temper who is speaking on a 
cellular phone while drinking the 
remainder of a twelve-pack. 

7. My husband not only can't 
remember my birthday - he can't 
remember my name. 

8. My house is overrun with 
dust bunnies - and they're alive. 
Our only furnishings consist of 
stained and unmatched furniture, 
broken toys, and stuffed dead fish. 

9. Every time the doorbell rings, 
it's a nei^ibor, wanting to borrow 
something. 

10. Our neighbors are Charles 
Manson and Jeffrey Dahmer. 



Questions or comments for hu- 
morist Donna Abear can be sent to 
Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S. Wfiitney 
St., Grayslake.lL 60030, 



V. 




A: 



One carmel Parkway 

Mundelein, iL 60060 

Voice: (847) 566-3000 

Fax: (847) 566-8465 

E-Mail: @carmel. kl2.il. us 

Home Page: 

http://carmel.k12.il.us 



A National Blue Ribbon Recognized School Of Excellence 
A National Exemplary School Of Excellence 



B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



November 6, 1998 



John Carpenter's 'Vampires' really does stink 



Y'ampirvs"is an appropriate 
title for John Carpenter's 
new Elm because it leaves 
you feeling like you have just 
had the life sucked from your body. 

Watching this movie is about as 
enjoyable as having someone drive a 
wooden stake through your heart, or 
at least leaves you wishing someone 
would. 

The premise for the movie 
sounded intriguing enough. It is 
loosely based on actual history. 

In the 1300s there was a Roman 
Catholic priest named Valek who 
was denounced from the church for 
his unorthodox ways. 

He formed his own seel to rebel 
against the church. He was arrested 
and an attempted exorcism was per- 
formed before he was burned at the 



To Suliscrilu' To Your 
Hometown News 
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Lakeland 

.Newspapers 




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stake. At the time ofhls execution he 
was in possession of a black cross 
which the Vatican confiscated and 
still keeps hidden in Vatican archives. 

That much is supposedly tnie 
and "Vampires" uses the story as the 
premise for the movie. In the film 
Valek is the original vampire and he 
is searching the world for the black 
cross. If he finds it, vampires will be 
able to walk during the day and rule 
the world. 

The premise sounded promising 
enough but unfortunately the result 
stinks as bad as a clove of garlic. 

The film is set in the American 
Southwest and at times has the feel of 
a cheesy western. Only in this case it is 
mixed with a cheesy vampire (lick, 
James Wnnris is Jack Crow, the 
head of a (cam of vampire killers 
liiretl by the Vatican [o riil (he world 
of (he Uittlead and stop the vampires 
before (heygcl (he cross. 

Woods, as always, does a great 
job "I delivering his lines bu( he is 
hard to piciureaslJie hard-nosed 
lougl i guy savior. 

QrtftV and his (earn are (he best at 
what they do. They are equipped 
will] Male of ihe hi I cmsshtjws and 
nlhei assorted weaponry. Unfortu- 
nately for (hem, Valek is more power- 
ful than any vampire ihey have ever 
seen. 

Daniel Ualdwin. as Crow's right- 
hand man Montoya, gives a lethargic 



movie review 




John Kmitta 



watching a film about special effects 
with the extreme amounts of fake 
blood and the overused pyrotechnics 
of vampires burning up in the sun- 
light. 

John Carpenter's "Halloween" 
was scarier than "Vampires. " 

If you want to see a better vam- 
pire film see "Blade"viilh Wesley 
Snipes. It is a much more stylish film 
with a better plot and will leave you 
feeling pumped full of adrenaline 
rather than sucked dry of blood. 

1 give John Carpenter's "Vam- 
pires" one and a half out of five pop- 
corn boxes. 



John Carpenter's 
Vampires 

Rated R 

Directed byi 

John Carpenter 

Stoning 

James Woods 

Daniel Baldwin 

Thomas Ian Griffith 

Maximilian Schell 

Tim Gulnee 



performance making the film seem 
dull. 

If anyone steals the show it is 
Tim Quince as Father Adam, the 
priest who finds the courage to help 
slay vampires. He seems like more of 
a real person than Crow or Montoya 
because he shows his fear and over- 
comes it. 

The movie does have action but 
il also drags along at points making 
the annoying rock-guitar soundtrack 
even more noticeable. 

There are some creepy moments 
but i( is not so much scary as it is 
gory. 

litis film is definitely not for 
those easily sickened by die sight of 
blood. There are on-screen decapita- 
tions and mutilations but none of 
this is really scary. It is more like 



H9 



7 M&tffrh Us • 



John Carpenter's "Vampires" leaves a lot to be desired. 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries- March 21/April 20 

You have an important business decision to 
make this week, Aries. While you need to look out 
for your own interests, doni disregard everyone 
else involved. Try to make a decision thai will 
benefit everyone. People are counting on you 1o 
be fair. A ioved one gets into financial trouble late 
in the week. Do what you can lo help. 

Taurus- April 21/May 21 

You have the perfect opportunity to enhance your 
love life early in the week. You've been waiting for 
this chance lor a long time. Don't let il pass you 
by. A dose friend needs lo talk with you about a 
business situation. Don'l put him or her off. This 
is an important matter thai you have to deal with. 
Cancer plays a key role. 

Gemini- May 22/June 21 

Il seems as rl you're lacing an uphill battle when 



- j ■■» q > wc* ■ ■ ■ — _- ^ — —- . .— -- — —— — — — t -j ^ - w h ^ ^ 

[cu^cWcinemaS 



it comes to a personal problem early in the week, 
Gemini, Don't lei these setbacks gel you down. 
You need to stay determined if you wanl to ac- 
complish anything. A loved one offers you some 
constructive criticism. Listen to what he or she 
has to say without getting upset. 

Cancer- June 22/July 22 
Your sense of humor saves the day early in the 
week. A lense situation has everyone on edge, 
but your wit makes people laugh and relax While 
only a few actually tell you, everyone appreciates 
your efforts. A friend of a friend calls you unex- 
pectedly. Listen to what he or she has to say. 

Leo -July ^''August 23 
A close friend invites you lo an important social 
event. Even though you're nervous, say yes. The 
evening has many pleasant surprises in store for 
you. A loved one needs your help dealing with a 
family situation. Be supportive, and do what you 
can to help. Gemini plays a key role. 



Virgo -Aug 24/Sept 22 

There's a lot going on this week, Virgo, so keep 
things organized. It's the only way to gel things 
done. A dose friend comes (o you with a person- 
al problem. While you would like to help, you 
know that you really cant do anything to improve 
Ihe situation. Resist getting involved. 

Libra- Sept 23/0ct 23 

You have to make a decision about your compli- 
cated romantic life this week, Libra YouVe been 
putting it off for loo long now. Think about what you 
really want and make your decision. It's the best 
thing to do for everyone involved. Leo plays a role. 

Scorpio- Oct 24/Nov 22 
Doni let a business associate influence a career 
move that you're considering. You have to do whal 
is best for you. Those doses! lo you will under- 
stand and support your decision, A former friend 
wants to get dose again. Think about the conse- 
quences before saying yes. Is it really worth it? 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 

Keep your wrte about you earty in the week, Sagit- 
tarius, or you're sure lo say the wrong thing at the 
wrong time. Listen to what others are saying, and 



respond to litem. Doni just blurt out whatever is 
on your mind. That special someone has a sur- 
prise for you this weekend. Enjoy yourself! 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 

A dose friend introduces you to an Important busi- 
ness associate. Doni let his or her outgoiig nature 
overwhelm you. Be confident, and you're sure lo 
make a good impression. The person whom you've 
been seeing wants to call it quits. While you're up- 
set, think about I This really is for the best. 

Aquarius -Jan 21/Feb1B 

An acquaintance offers lo assist you with an im- 
portant matter late in Ihe week. Doni overanafyze 
the situation. He or she just warts to help. A loved 
one needs your advice about a romantic relation- 
ship. Be honest Wh3e he or she may not want lo 
hear what you have to say, it needs to be said. 

Plsces-Feb19/March20 

It seems as if everyone you know is trying to hold 
you back this week. Doni get discouraged. Gel- 
ting upset only will make things worse. Try lo 
make as much progress as you can. A friend 
needs a shoulder to cry on late in the week. Be 
there for him or her. 



847-973-2800 



Sanlsri 
Children. 
Mollneot 



fall Hon of Rte. 132 « Rollins Rd. • Fox lake 



n,mun.uMiin„miiH»u 



MOVIES AND TIMES START NOVEMBER 6, 1998 



5HOWTIME5 - FRIDAY, MOV. 6 
THRU THURSDAY, MOV 12 

RUSH HOUR ire m orami 

Fri. 7 10 950 

5al I 25 5 45 7 10 9 50 

5un/Wed 1 25 3 15 5 55 8 10 

Mon/Tue/Thur 5.55 8: 10 

THE SIEGE* ir) oraimi 

Fri 6 55 9:40 

5at 1 10 405 6:55 9:40 

5unAWed. 2 15 5 15 8 05 

Mon/Tue/Thur 5 15 8 05 

ANTZ (pg) 

Fri 7 15 

Sal 1.55 4 00 7 15 

5un/Wed 1 55 4 00 6 00 8 00 

Mon/Tue/Thur. 600 8:00 

SOLDIER (Ftj 

Frl./5at 9 45 

PUEASANTVILLE (mm 

Fri. 6:45 9:50 

5at. 1:00 355 645 9 50 

5un/\Wed. 2:00 5: 10 8:00 

Mon/Tue./Thur. 5:10 8:00 

VAMPIRES m 

Fri. 7:05 9:40 

5at. 1:10 4:10 7:05 9:40 

5un./Wed 2:25 5:20 8:10 

MonTTue/rhur. 5:20 8:10 

'tio passes or coupons 

FREE REFILLS - ALL SIZES 
POPCORM fit SOFT DRiriKS 

Ho chiWnn undtf * jjjjtol la R-ntea itiovitt alUr 6 PU 



LAKE ZURICH (847)550-0000 

755 S. Rand Rd. 6 



. a r\n SENIORS (OVER 60) & CHILDREN 
>nw )t1 4 UNDER) ADULTS $1 SO AFTER 6PM 

new rnjotwr price -t< an mail rues (with vwjoq 



N'Mjii.iin«.ii;nniiui:i,'i,rm.n,mri 



THE WATER BOY *«> 

Daily 11:40, 1220, 1:40, 2:20, 3:40, 4:25, 5:40, 
6:30,7:45,8:35,9:50 

WIZARD OF OZ «> 

Daily 11:45, 2:00, 4:15, 6:30,045 

THE SIEGE n 

Daily 11:50, 12*0, 2:15, 320, 4:40, 5:50, 7:10, 
8:20,9:40 

JOHN CARPENTER'S VAMPIRES <» 

Dairy 12:35, 2:45, 5^K>, 7:20, 9:40 

PLEASANTMLE *., 

Dairy 12:50, 3:30, 6:10, 8:50 

AFiTZirc) 

Daily 12-00, 1:45, 3:40, 5:35, 725, 9:15 

PRACTICAL MAGIC ™ 

DaQy 12.-00, 2:15, 4:30, 6:50 

WHATDREAMSMAYCOME— , 

Daily MO, 4:00, &2Q, 8:45 

BRIDE OF CHUCKY, 

DalyM, 140, 535,7:30, 925 

IBIES Slirai ABOUT Hi. 

Dairy1^0,350,6:10,835 



ANT10CH (847) 395-0216 J 
378 Lake St. Antioch • 



s 



2 



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OJNOEn 1 1) & JUJ. SHOWS BEFORE «>M 
SUO ADULTS AFTER 6PM 



THE WATER BOY <*<» 

Fri., Mon.-Thurs. 6:45, 9:00 

Sat-Sun. 2:15, 4:30, 

6:45, 9:00 



LIBERTY (847)362-3011 
708 N, Milwaukee Ave., Llbertyvllle 



SOOO SENIORS |01f£B CO), CHILDHtN 
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There's Something 
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Fri., Mon.-Thur. 6:30 
Sat-Sun. 4:00. 6:30 

APT PUPIL (Pfi-") 

Fri., Mon. - Thur. 9:DO 
Sat.-Sun. 9:00 

PARENT TRAP <H) 

Sat.-Sun. 1:30 

NIGHT AT THE R0XBURY(P6-ii) 

Fri., Mon.-Thur. 6:45, 0:45 
Sat.-Sun. 2:16, 4:30, 8:45, 8:45 



•RESTRICTED (NO PASSES/COUPONS] 



IttnuEcl 



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51 50 SEH©rttf0vra«3& CHILDREN 

I |M&U(JDD1)AIHJLTSS3jMAFrEfl6PM ', 



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FrL, Mon. - Thurs. 830 
Sat- Suaiao, 830 

RONIN on 

Fri., Mon. - Thurs. 6:00 
Sat - Sun. 3:45, 6:00 

NIGHT AT THE ROXBURY <*»> 

Fri., Mon. - Thurs. 6:15, 8:15 
Sat. • Sun. 2:00, 4:15, 6:15. 8:15 



ShowPlacbS 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S of(ED 
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1*1:10 *4:I0] 8:00 DIGTTAL 

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THE NEGOTIATOR (R) 

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ARMAGEDDON (PG-13) 

[*I2:30 *3:45] 7:00 10:00 DIGITAL 

PARENT TRAP (PG) 

[* 1 2:40 *3:50]6:45 9:30 DIGTTAL 

AIR BUD 2 (G) 

[♦12:15 +2:20 *4:30] 6:40 9:00 



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Free flclill on Popcorn t. Soft Drinks! 
ALL r 

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"■"""■ r . r ~ '""• " """ , i ----■---■ ' : ■■-. .._ ■ . : ■.- &mi&zsi&t 



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Novembers, 1998 



arts 

sur- 



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FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



..^- - ; ."-■-.■■ ■-•• .'' ;• - " 



Lakeland NeivspapersfBl 



■• 




* y m 



r the Homeless 1998 Craft Show set for Nov. 7 






"ril r ? 0, U e the s P arrow Saturday, Nov. 7, fjrom9 aim. to 3 at 60 craft booths. Sparrow vol- the shelter's guidance, programs 

inyitesftlends and neighbors to .p.m. if Parkland Junior High unteers will host a food conces- to eliminate hbraelessness and 

: supgortjuid enjoy their 10th School in McHeiuy, 1802 Ring- alori stand and the Harvest's Joblessness.' 

annual Harvest for the Home- wood Road, just north of Route "penny raffle" of a nice variety of Volunteers and crafters may 

Iess * 120. crafts; Admission to the craft contact Chairperson Barbara 

The craft showwlll be held on Start your holiday shopping show is $2. Allproceeds benefit Llpinskl at (815)344-9661. 



Please Send Community 
Calendar Information To: 

IMElAro 

ctoCRBIlNAFEINDT 

30&WaitoeySL' V 
.; GraysUteilLto) 

Phone 223-8161 







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CLUES 
ACROSS 

1. Gluts 
4;^Audio 
■ system 
8. Female 
grunts 

10. Frenzy 

1 1 . Catch 

12. Conform- 
ing to 
jurispru- 
dence 

13. Brain 
parts 

14. Projectiles 

15. Italian 
painter 

18. Before 



birth 
20. Indian 
helmet 

22. Register 
formally,' 
variation 

23. Steamship 
line ends 

24. Furnishes 
income 

25. Malice 

CLUES 
DOWN 

1. Specimen 
+ sufficient 

2. Oscine 

3. Small bird 

+ sprawl 



5. African ';}[' 
country 

6. Islamic 
calendar 
month 

7. Belief + 
wing 

9. Xerophiles 

16. Love 
intensely 

17. Egyptian 
city - 

19. Auricu- 

lated 
21. Snare 



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Midwestern Regional Medical Center Received One 
of the Nation's Highest Ratings for Quality Care. 



When it comes lo healthcare which is personal- 
ized, compassionate and truly focused on your 
needs, Midwestern Regional Medical Center is the 
clear choice. 

Our 95-bed hospital, located in a park-like setting 
with_ejisy_access and ample parking, has set the 
standard nationwide for excellence and innovation. 
In 1996, Midwestern received a rating of 99 out of 
100 by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of 
Healthcare Organizations, ranking the hospital 
among the top four percent of all hospitals in the 
United Stales. 



That remarkable accomplishment reflects a commit- 
ment to medical excellence and quality care by 300 
physicians, nurses and other exceptional caregivers. 
Our patients tell us time and again that we're like no 
;Olher hospital - that they're treated like individual 
people, caring for them IxxJy, mind and soul. 

It's a difference that makes us special and it's just 
one of the reasons why we're one of the highest 
rated hospitals In the country. 

Find out bum tfiduestern am make a tllffervnce In 
your life. For an itiforniallnn l/il. or to schedule a taur. 
please call 800/322-9183 art 6262 




Midwestern m^ 

REGIONAL It E D 1 C A L C E N T K * 

2520 Elisha Avenue, Zion, IL 60099 
www.cancercenter.com 



,— Cancer program manaood by ■ 



,- Accreditation wtth Commendation by ■ 



9l 

VnuarxiHs'i 



i^ AiiJMfxigfr a>''*»' 




- 



■ 



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U.J* 



■jp^pwpi 



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B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



November 6, 1998 November 6, 1998 







I »,»,.» -■-:.**. -ft \-.— , c^iii" " '■■*? ' 



HOT SPOTS 



:r'-..i^ ■'.'- 




• 



Win s 40 Gift Certificate 

List your favorite HOT SPOTS restaurant for our 
monthly drawing to win a s 40 gift certificate. 

Name:___ 

Address: — 

City/State/Zip: _ 

Phone: 



Check us out on the web at wwwJpnews.com 



Favorite Restaurant: 



Mail-in to: Lakeland Newspapers, 
P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 




.,--■ .. . 









• ' '..<*: 



• «»-•- -»^*- | B ^l|I H f*'^PHJMJ^ 






Location 



5572 Grand Ave, in Cumee 



ajaTllL'iWf* £ ADVERTISEMENT ^$S2&&fc&&&mG*tM-^. 

KING'S Ming s meqns 

at its 



• <fi 






Telephone: 

Ming's (847) 662-5597 and The 
Grand felace, (847) 662-2929, 






Hours: 

Monday through Friday, froni 11 30 
am to 10 p.m. and on Saturday and 
Sunday, from 11 :30 a.m. to 11 pm 



■ / 



Menu: : 
The finest In Mandarin and Szechwan 
cuisine served in Ming's secret 
sauces. Delicious American cuisine is 
served at The Grand ftlace. 





KL*s 



Vuk&'s grill 

THE M TICKET IS HIKE 

6 PifTerent Games of Your Choice 

Prizes £ FRIES NFL Tickets Given Away 

on Sunday and Monday 

7 Screens - IO ' &iG Screen 

Ifl/otch Vour Favorite College Games on Saturday 

ESPN 6 Games to Choose From 

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Prink Specials 




m 

^ Gift Cetitjkata 

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- LFi -■:;.• : -■'■'.'■■; 



Gnmt Smack* •Brgat WmuI^J 1 ,; 









Located af; Rte.r 176 v|u>ti East^ttRireSpfc 

Call: (S47) S^e-OCHi^ 
W Liberty StreBt^ Waucontl 



47e 

tl am - 1 am Weekdays II am '- 

■:v- ■'■■ '^ttt^t#M%- , r 



Rft» 









For rtroeyeai^Chih Ming Un has welcomed Lake Cc^t/s lexers of fine 
Chinese food to Ming's of Gina, located at 5572 Grand Ave. in Cumee, where 
.. they have enjoyed the best MancynandSzech^na^ne;^:";;^^.^^^ / 
The mysterious Orient has never been more apparent than in Ming's secret 
redoes and the special sauces that make the ^ he serves different from 
;c^CWnese restaurant '■: -.;''■ : ; : ^:': 

'•' Ming and his extremeiy courteous and weil-trained staff continue to prove . 
that Mings b an excellent choice; whether trtdrpitore 
■ restaurant's authentic and casual atmosphere, or r^I<e add idouscany^ order 
'home, )':.<$ ■ '- '^■/^' 

For more than 20 years, Ming has served the finest Oriental cuisine,' special- 
izing in many original Mandarin and Szechwan redoes handed down from his : . ■" 
father, whose Chinese ailinaryexpertise grew from 50 years of experience in 
Chinese food preparation. 

Ming opened Ming's of China at 1941 E. Algonquin Rd. in Sehaumburg eight 
I years ago, bringing his culinary skills (oGumee in 1995, 



: :^:^ : r>|b;ibd^CliiraK'festaijrant canofler the vast array of spedal entrees that 
Include Ming's Sizzling Plate, or Ming's Spedal Lo Mein, Pan Fried Noodles or 
Genera] Tso's Chicken, served in an unusual arid very spicy sauce More secret 
preparations are errpwyed m beating Mir^exdusive House Salati 

'■ Ming invites everyone to enjoy his fantastic Sunday Buffet, served from 
1 1 30 am to 2i30 pm for $9.95; The Infinite variety c4 cleledables indudes ,; | 
Honey Shrimp, BBQ RJbs, four cfuctoandt^ 
dishes, three vegetables and four scrurrfXious desserts' All & 
are made with Mings original sauces:. '..>'-' 

Adjacent to Mings of China is the CrarKJ Palao? Barepjet Center where a 
iuxurious setting, palate pleasing American cuisine, and seating 'up to 250 \ 
"make it everyone^ fiistchacefor mat important pany^a banquet from that . [ \ 

'^Vedding to Remember" to anniversary parries, business banouets and special 
celebrations. It isn't too earfy to make reservatiorB for diatrdkiayrjarty extract 

. dinairre. There are still a few open dates, and spedal prrarig for weekday holi- 
day parte, »ir^l^ 

. Ming's of China and the Craix! Palace Banquet Center are easy to find 
since they are located just east of 1-94, in front of the Hampton Inn, at the 
center of Lake County^ entertainment Mecca. Ming's accepts all major credit 
cards, for more information, call {847) 662-5597. 



■ 
. ■ 



'^^-•■,--n,:;t:*w.-". 



'*,'.■ ^V*' ■'■ *-,;-" j\'V i -* -..' ±^-*'~;_-' !*'•'* **<*, 



<;,*jn\*:r..^ ; ■ I -•;. ^;*^r 



INEED A CHANGE OF PACE? 

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The Finest in Mandarin and Szechwan Cuisine 

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Located In Ihe Old C*MW Train Depot 

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JOOU & Unnk (847)223-2575 



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Make your 
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m 



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, ■■ ■*. i.A --■ hr m --~\ - - ..... ■~ J 



. win csin 



m":wm^ : m 



"Daydreams Come True at Night" 

The Dick Jurgens 

Big Band Weekend 

Under the Direction 

of Don Ring 

November 13-15, 1998 




Vjr.» '-' 



621 N. 1 Midlothian Rd *:Miu delein--;Q^/.?!fiy/;..- "" 




The Best Chinese Food\ 
■*jk In The Area... 

^* And Our Customers ) 



*Jii^^, ;• ' 



£ / . AreJhe Critics 



Chinese Restaurant plen(y of Free Parldng 

■ Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

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1 



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$389.00 

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Friday or Saturday 

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Two Night Package Includes: 

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• Friday Night Neptune Seafood Buffet 

• Saturday Night Banquet Dinner in Grand 
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• Sunday Champagne Brunch in the 
Monaco Dining Room 

• Ballroom Dancing Friday and Saturday 
Evenings, 8:00 pm to Midnight 

• All Taxes and Gratuities 



Saturday Night 

One Hour Open Bar 

Dinner and Dancing 

$86.00 per couple 



Far Reservations 
and Info rmat ion 
B0Q-55S-24QS 




V 



The Abbey Resd^ ^ 

ON LAII C1NIVA 

Fontana, WI 



I 



§ 




Combo 




$830 
• $13.5 



i 



1 

I 

I 

)lOW OP£N;>: NEW OWNERS % 

Full Menu Til! Close § 

847-838-0626 >> 

25630 W.DressclRd. % 

TiVeRi. 59 loDeiefa Grave KiLTmn Wat TbOouglu, . ^ 
Tma South To DrcwtlT\ini\Me»i X; 



j m 

Sdtmidj/ 4 Sunday • 3-9pm 

icelancfic Cod & 
Icelandic Cod, Chicken 



i (847)223-6900 

§k 54 S. Seymour Downtown Grayslake^ 



* 




^Friday "NImW Easy ^ 
0(jf'iisrhiy "Joe. Name DJ ^ 



j 



ACO 



Fine Foods - Cocktails 
2816 Rt 120 • McHenry, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 





i6oz. Steak Dinner $ 11 



Home of -KrlteHenry's 




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B10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



S? 



LAKELIFE 



November $1998 




ypW^- ■■,;.'■;■ 



ill 



'.'i ! rV.uv'[i-;--y*^i' 1 f- i - 



FULL BUTCHER SHOP 

Individual Cuts 
Now Available 



EXTRA NO CHARGE 



With Purchase of 300 lbs. Beef& Up 

I 2 Lb. Case of Bacon No Charge! 



1 O Lbs. Porn chops No Charge! 
Lbs. Pork steak No Charge! 



io 



Lbs. Ham 



JVo Charge! 



5 Lbs. Pork Roast JVo Charge! 
I 5 Lbs. chicken Afo Charge! 



. t-o^^-j^ ,>;•■.-•• 






USDA CHOICE BEEF HALF 



,. ■ , ... ■"•■■.•■..:-. ■ 



FOR 
LBS. ONLY 

Sirloin Steaks Fillets 

Porterhouse Steaks Strip Steaks 

T-Bone Steaks Round Steaks 

Cube Steaks Swiss Steaks 

[Rib Steaks Family Steaks 



USDA CHOICE BEEF HIND QUARTERS 



Per Week 
For 

17 Weeks 
Sirloin Roast 
Standing Rib Roast 
Rump Roast 
Chuck Roast 
Ground Beef ._ 



I* 



FOR 
LBS. ONLY 




Avg.Wgt. 300 lbs. and U' 



EXAMPLE: 300 lb. Beef Half 
at $1.28 lb. equals $384.00 
plus 60 lb. bonus. No charge 
with Beef Half. 




Round Steaks T-Bone Steaks 

Porterhouse Steaks Sirloin Tip Roast 
Ground Beef Minute Steaks 

* Avg.Wgt. 125-250 lbs. 



Per Week 

For 
17 Weeks 

Rump Roast 

Eye otThe Round Roast 

Round Roast 




[E^PUE;lM;LB.H|nd , 
[Quarters $1.49 equals $223.50] 



CHARGE ITS 

NO FINANCE CHARGES 

1 . No Money Down Required 

2. First Payment Due 30 Days From 
Purchase 

3. No Interest or Carrying Charge. 
Just Pay in 90 days 

4. We will gladly take your application over 
the phone. Just call 847-838-MEAT 




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i $10.00 Gas Allowance si 

S With This Coupon W 

B 15 



Si 

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$10.00 Deducted 

From Cost ol Meat 



WITH THIS COUPON 



18 

8 

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3% DISCOUNT FOR 

SENIOR CITIZENS, 

REPEAT 

CUSTOMERS & 

MILITARY PERSONNEL! 






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50 lbs. & Up 



HOURS 

OPEN DAILY 

id-6 

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Sunday & Monday 





f*mim***wKv..'>^:-<i l i...- J >ir.vt,.^.- r^i"^JJ'»^4> ^^ Nt> M 'lV«^M*l».to 




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"■ I - ■ - - 



• 



{CANCER 
RESOURCE CENTER 

Walk-In mammograms 
I set at Gumeo Mills 

Strike "I don't have the time" 
land "it's not convenient"* as excuses 
[for not getting a mammogram. 

Every Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 7 
[p.m., no appointment Is necessary 
for a mammogram at the Cancer Re- 
source Center in Gurnee Mills Mall, 
)ocated at Entrance H, next to JC 
Penney. Just walk In, sign the ap- 
pointment book, and in less than 30 
ilnutes, your mammogram will be 
) m pi e ted by a caring and cortsleen- 
ious Imaging technician who spe- 
cializes in mammography. 

Cost for a mammogram Is $49, 
icluding reading and Interpretation 
by a Board-certified radiologist Re- 
mits will be sent to your personal 
physician. 

To make an appointment or for 

lore Information, call (800) 940- 

[822. The Cancer Resource Center, 

lerica's number one source for 

lews and information about cancer, 

affiliated with Cancer Treatment 

jnters of America. 

IIDWESTERN 
1EG1QNAL 

free blood 
ressure screenings 

Have your blood pressure 
icked by a healthcare professional 
[the office of a physician affiliated 
jth Midwestern Regional Medical 
fnter, Zlon. Call die physician clos- 

t to you for an appointment: 

Lake Villa: Dr. Pedro Palu-ay, Dr. 

Isy Andaleon, and Dr. Lubna 
if, 300 N. Milwaukee Ave., 356- 

)2; 

jLlndenhurst: Dr. Semyon 

slovsky, 2045 E. Grand Ave., 356- 

Park City. Dr. Glynis Vashi, 401 S. 
^Greenleaf Ave., 263-9900; 

Waukegan: Dr. Pedro Palu-ay, 
Dr. Daisy Andaleon, and Dr. Lubna 
Maruf, 2504 Washington Ave., 249- 
1733; and Dr. Phillip Ruiz, 1020 Glen 
Flora Ave., 249-3322; and 

Zion: Dr. Pedro Palu-ay, Dr. 
Daisy Andaleon, and Dr. Lubna 
Maruf, 1911 27th St., 872-1615, 

Striving & Surviving 
cancer support group 

The Lake County YWCA has an- 
nounced the formation of the Striv- 
ing & Surviving Breast Cancer Sup- 
jort Group, which cares for the 
leeds of young women diagnosed 
ith breast cancer. The group is fa- 
cilitated by Tanya Johnson and Bev- 
erly McCray and is sponsored by the 
Midwestern Regional Medical Cen- 
I ter and Cancer Treatment Centers of 
[America in Zion. 

There are hundreds of young 
I women diagnosed with breast can- 
cer every year. These breast cancer 
patients have unique needs, for ex- 
ample, who will care for their young 
children while they recover? The goal 
of the group is to provide support to 
the young breast cancer victim (di- 
agnosed before age 45) that will in- 
clude peer support, child care re- 
[ sources, and educational services. 

Cancer does not have to be a 
[death sentence, "There is life after 
[chemotherapy and radiation." 

For more information on meet- 
I ing times and dates, call 662-4247. 

Mammograms 
[offered for $49 

For just $49, women can have 
[mammograms performed — includ- 
ing reading and interpretation by a 
J Board-certified radiologist — at Mid- 
jwestern Regional Medical Center, 
[2520 Elisha Ave., Zion. 

A mammogram can help detect 
I cancer before you can see or feel any- 
[thing. Our caring and conscientious 
I imaging specialist will fully explain the 
[procedure, answer questions, and 
complete die mammogram, usually 
[in less than 30 minutes. Results from 
(your mammogram will be sent to your 
[personal physician. 

For more Information, or for an 
[appointment call Midwestern at 731- 
[4100. Medicare, commercial insur- 
ance, credit cards and personal 
[checks are welcome. 



' . - 



'<%:/T 










Novembers, 1998 l - ,:; %J||gg^^^^^^^^ 

7th Annual Festival of Trees to provide family ftin 

JL ' .;'-.•/'..: ,-■ ;.V;'.'. 



Join Connl Marie Brazelton of 
NBC-TV's "ER," at the Victory Hos- 
pital Foundation's "Firs t Night In the 
Forest," at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 
18 at MIdlane Country Club, 4555 
Yorkhouse Rd., Wadsworth. This 
magical tree lighting and preview 
event launches the 7th Annual Festi- 
val of frees, Lake County's holiday 
tradition. "First Night" is the only 
time to purchase the tree or wreath 
of your choice. You'll also meet Con- 
ni, be among the first to delight In the 
magic of the festival, browse the craft 
and gift shops, enjoy entertainment 
and partake of refreshments. Ad- 
vanced tickets are $20 each and also 
allow one return visit to the festival at 
a later date. For tickets or for more 
information, call The Victory Devel- 
opment Department at 360-4248. 

Beanies, Babies and Bears 

It's a well known fact that you'll 
see some of the most unique holiday 
trees at the Victory Hospital Founda- 
tion's 7th Annual Festival of Trees, 
Nov. 18-22, at MIdlane Country 
Club, 4555 Yorkhouse Road, 
Wadsworth. But sure to steal the 
show is the "Beanies, Babies and 
Bears" tree which will be on display 
in the festival's Enchanted Village gift 
shoppe. 

Whoever said, "You can't get 
something for nothing" didn't know 
the folks at the festival. The "Beanies, 
Babies and Bears" tree is going to be 
won by someone who attends the 
Festival of Trees. Better yet, the win- 
ner won't have to spend a dime over 
the price of admission to win it. 
That's because one free raffle ticket 
for this special "Beanies, Babies and 
Bears" tree will be awarded with 
each paid admission to the 7th An- 
nual Festival of Trees. Extra tickets 
will be available for sale during the 
festival in the gift shoppe, lower lev- 
el of Midlane Country Club. 



This unique holiday tree is deco- 
rated with a variety of Beanie Ba- 
bies™ bears as well as teddy bears 
from the Russ Bertie™, Ty™ and 
Gund™ product lines. Topping the 
tree is Sherbert, the popular tie-dyed 
Pillow Pal™ bear. Among the Beanie 
Babies™ hanging outonthetreeare 
Princess, Glory, Peace and the exclu- 
sive Clubby. 

For a chance to win this special 



and household decorations from 
some of the nation's leading holiday 
product manufacturers. Her gift 
shoppe shelves will be filled with fan- 
ciful Santas and elegant angels, as 
well as snowmen of every descrip- 
tion. From centerpieces to tree orna- 
ments, wall hangings to pillows, hol- 
iday shoppers will find something of 
Interest in the festival's gift shoppe. 
Included in this year's selections are 




From left, Glory Bear and Connl Marie Brazelton will be on hand 
at the 7th Annual Victory Hospital Foundation's Festival of Trees 
from Nov. 18-22 at Midlane Country Club, Wadsworth. Festival- 
goers will have a chance to win Glory Bear and many of his friends 
on the "Beanies, Babies and Bears" tree, which will be on display 
In the Enchanted Village gift shoppe. Brazelton, known for her role 
on "ER," will appear at the "First Night In the Forest" event on 
Nov. 18 at 6 p.m. at Midlane Country Club. 



tree, fesdval goers should fill out their 
tree raffle tickets and drop them in 
the bin located in the Enchanted vil- 
lage gift shoppe on the lower level of 
Midlane Country Club. While there, 
they'll notice the shops have a lot to 
offer besides the "Beanies, Babies 
and Bears" tree. 

Nancy Merlock of Beach Park 
has gathered a dazzling array of gifts 



a wide range of teacher gifts. Eco- 
nomically priced, shoppers will find 
gift item pricing begins at $2. 

The 7th Annual Festival of Trees is 
sponsored by the Victory Hospital 
Foundation to benefit women's 
health services at Victory's surgery 
centers in Lindenhurst and 
Waukegan. The festival will be held 
from Nov. 19-22 at Midlane Country 



Club, 4555 Yorkhouse; Road, 
Wadsworth. General festival admis- 
sion is $4 fo r a d ul ts and $2 for senior 
citizens and children 12 and under. 

In addition. to the fabulous En- 
chanted Village gift shops, the Festl- y' 
val of Trees features over 70 design- 
er decorated holiday trees and 
wreaths, a community tree competi- 
tion, a bake shop filled with tasty hoi- 
Iday treats, dozens of talented enter- 
tainers, and Santa's Workshop of 
children's activities and crafts. 

For more Information on the 7th 
Annual Festival of Trees, call 360- 
4248, Monday through Friday, be- 
tween 8 and 4:30 p.m. 

Santa's Showtime 

Imagine entering a room where 
adventure, Illusion and reality all col- 
lide. A room where common playing 
cards and brightly colored scarves 
take you beyond their normal use. A 
room where the mysteries of magic 
come to life. The Victory Hospital 
Foundation's 7th Annual Festival of 
Trees Is providing such a special room 
at its "Santa's Showtime" holiday 
events. While In tiiat room, guests of 
all ages will experience the magical 
wonders of Bill Blagg III of Zion. 

Blagg will give five performances 
for "Santa's Showtime" at the Festi- 
val of Trees: 6 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 
20; at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturday, 
Nov. 21 ; and at 1 1 a.m. and 2 p.m. on 
Sunday, Nov. 22. A limited number 
of tickets are available for each show. 
They can be purchased in advance at 
Consumers Cooperative Credit 
Unions in Mundelein, Round Lake 
Beach and Waukegan; Victory Lakes 
Continuing Care Center in Linden- 
hurst, Victory Memorial Hospital 
cashier's office in Waukegan or by 
calling the Victory Development De- 
partment at 360-4248 between 8 a.m. 
and 4:30 p.m. Monday thourgh Fri- 
day. 



How Safe is your 
Bottled Water? 



Bottied water is a popular al- 
ternative for anyone con- 
cerned about the taste or 
safety of tap water. Here 
are some facts you should keep in 
mind when selecting a bottied wa- 
ter. 

Some bottled waters come from 
die same source as your tap water, 
however this does not mean that 
they are of the same quality. Pay at- 
tention to the label. Bottled waters 
are required to indicate their 
sources, and many often specify 
what type of purification has been 
performed. Here are some defini- 
tions of the terms you will see: 

Ozonation: disinfecting with 
ozone, and without the use of 
chemical additives. 

Distillation: heating water un- 
til it converts to steam, which is 
then condensed and collected, leav- 
ing most of the contaminants be- 
hind. 

Reverse Osmosis: forcing wa- 
ter through a membrane that allows 
only water molecules to pass 
through, while discharging contam- 
inants to the drain. 

Carbon Filtration: the physi- 
cal and chemical adsorption of con- 
taminants onto granular activated 
carbon or carbon blocks. This 
process is especially effective for re- 
moval of organic chemicals, some 
of which may be carcinogens. 

Standards of Identity: The 



U.S. Food and Drug Administration 
(FDA) has established Standards of 
Identity for all bottled waters. La- 
bels must now indicate the category 
to which each bottled water be- 
longs, which is dependent on the 
source of the water. 

Artesian: from a well tapping a 
confined aquifer. 

Mineral: naturally contains a 
mineral content of at least 250 ppm. 

Purified: processed through 
distillation, deionization or reverse 
osmosis; (may come from a munici- 
pal source). 

Sparkling: contains the same 
amount of carbon dioxide as it had 
at emergence from source. 

Spring: underground formation 
from which water naturally flows. 

Sterile: meets U.S. Pharma- 
copeia requirements for sterile water. 

Well: taken from a constructed 
ground source. 

The FDA does not define terms 
such as "natural," "organic," or 
"pure," for bottled water, so you 
should look on the label for one of 
the approved Standards of Identity. 
That way, you can know for sure 
where the water comes from. 
It is always best to buy bottled wa- 
ter that has been tested by a quali- 
fied, independent body, so you 
know that the bonier is meeting the 
regulations of the FDA Any bottler 

Please see WATER IB12 




The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established 
Standards of Identity for all bottled waters. Labels must now in- 
dicate the category to which each bottled water belongs, which 
Is dependent on the source of the water. 



I -.^cjwfc^E^assaieftS 1 



:-j-.-^ir..l-*' 



B12 /Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



November 6, 1998 



JC 



Teaching kids to be good sports 



Dear Dr. Singer, 

My kids love to watch 
sports with my 
husband. I'm 
greatly concerned 
about the lack of good sports- 
manship 1 see exhibited In 
many of these games. I don't 
want my kids to get the Idea 
that It's o.k. to act like some of 
these sports people act 

These people are made out 
to be heroes In our society 
juid I'm very disturbed by 
what my kids may be picking 
up from this. Can you share 
any hints you might have to 
help them avoid this. I don't 
think it's right to make them 
stop watching sports, espe- 
cially, since It Is something 
that they can enjoy with my 
husband. F.R. 

Mm i i< • 

1 don't fivl cli.it n's lift t-vs.ii\ 
for iht'iii In stiip u, (tilling i mn 
pk'k-h i-iiIkt It s wIkii >nn !iH|> 
thi'in undrrsund thai will mukr 
(he dihYrrm c I li't-l th.it iIhti' ;irt' 
mam sport-. (Inures who exhibit 
hclntviof ulm h h nut m'a*ss;irily 
role tnodrl behavior, hut 1 also 
kimn th.il iIiiti' are many sports 
h^inrs ulm air ^rt-al roh- tuodrk 
I think that mudl nf tin* prob- 
lems Mi'in from i!u' repel iiivi- env- 
tttagt' the had behavior reiTivev IF 
a sports figure dors something 
shocking, the news n'pl;i\s it toi 
days I'm iertamh nut siying thai 
vvt- cannot know uhnwi a Inn I 
believe that mam t$ tin- rrttfre 
negative hi*]i ■'• wti* evhihiUHl in 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D. 



sports arc glorified and publicized 
ad infinilum. I wish sunn-day. the 
positive sports behaviors would 
havi' the same coverage. 

As far as what to tell your kids. 
I unitld make surf thai svfc»m*i 
u.itihi's the game I you men- 
tinned their dad) will) them dors 
ii t read Id sports players' had 
decisions and behavior with 
l.uighier ni any oilier positive 
ii-spnnse. 

I would also have Dad talk 
uilli the kuls afterwards aboiil 
good decisions ami had decisions 
II they watch a spurts player do 
something against someone else. 
Dad can toll them that this would 
never he acceptable behavior no 
mailer who did it. 

Your kids need to under - 
stand thai sports players are nol 
heroes or gods, bill rather, real 
people working/doing ihen |oh. 
In fact. I have heard many sports 
plavers respond in exactly lhal 
way: "It's nol my job to be a role 
model." 

I do believe, thai when you are 
in the public eye and kids can 
watch you. there is a certain 
responsibility thill goes along with 
thai Certainly, no one is ever 
going to impose someihing mi 



l&V 



Foot Cat 
Specialist 



BOAflD CEflTiFIED 1 



FOOT FACTS 

l-'roru t lh' loot hoctot 

DR. GRIFF J. WINTERS & ASSOC. 

:- : 'inq • -■■ ■'.!>.,■:,-■ Finn .: -v>^ S..r;;Kv 

INGROWN NAILS . • ' . i,.i n',. •■. -t .' '.- v i . •. ;.t -r <>,.|t ,,■,,,, !'| V 

' :■•'■.:■• t :■ .v ■ i -;i :•- permanently i . , '. ;.-.■:' .in 

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.'■'*•'■ i '. ', '•'•'■ '. ' •..•!• ' tlit-'i- it.,1, in- ,,n .itii./jf'i 



'By U>c American Board ot Poilin'nc Surgery 



770 Barron Blvd.' 

(me. 83) . 



223-4000 



Grayslake 






Oiily 




fitness 
memberships 

$10.00 



The Exercise Place 

15 Commerce Drive, Unit 105 

Grayslake, IL 60030 Phone: 847.223.9125 

limited to the first 50 people who join 
between 10798 & 11/98 



anyone like that and I'm nol sure 
lhai they should, however, you 
hope thai most sports figures 
understand that kids do watch 
them regularly. 

This is really no different than 
your kids watching any other form 
of entertainment. It is really 
important for parents to inform 



their kids about their morals, val- 
ues and expectations and then 
talk about it a lot with their kids. 
<{( these things are taught regular- 
ly, the apple usually doesn't fall 
f;ir from the tree no matter how 
many sporis incidents he or she 



sees 



77m column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information 
in this column cannot and should 
not replace proper psychological 
treatment. Dr. Sherri Singer is a 
Licensed Clinical Psychologist, 
childhood behavior specialist. Call 
in your questions and comments: 
(708) 962-2549. 



Halloween's over, but tooth decay continues 



Now thai Halloween is over 
.-iiid (lie candy is still around, par- 
ents tan allow (heir children Hi 
enjoy the "lreais" of Halloween 
without the "tricks" ol unncces- 
vir\ dental care down the mad by 
following a few simply rules, 
at cording lo the Chit ago Denial 
Sociely 

Demists are nol opposed lo 
ruling candy and chocolate, if it is 
done in moderation ;md in a way 
that helps minimize the damage 
done by plaque attacks," says 
Marvin Herman. DOS, a pediatric 
demist who practices in Chicago 
and who serves as a CDS 
spokesperson. I le cites the follow- 
ing guidelines created by the 
Chicago Denial Sociely. 

• Carefully inspeel all items 
collected, if you haven't already. 
"Parents should determine how 
much candy children have collect- 
ed, as well as what kind of candy," 
says Dr. Herman. 

• Place each child's "loot" 



where it can be monitored to 
determine how much carjdy is 
being eaten at any given time. 
"Children should not be allowed to 
keep candy in their rooms where 
they can snack away at will," says 
Dr. Herman. "Parents should take 
an active part in monitoring the 
amount of candy their kids eat." 
Also, he says, children should not 
be allowed to eat candy before 
going lo bed. 

• Discourage between-meal 
snacks, but when they occur, 
choose tooth- friendly snacks such 
as fruit, nuts or popcorn. "For 
example," says Dr. Berman, "pop- 
corn is a good alternative to sweet 
or sticky snacks because it is high 
in fiber, contains protein and iron, 
has no sugar and is low in calories. 
But popcorn balls are bad because 
of the sugars used to bind them 
together." 

• Restrict candy to be eaten 
after meals, followed immediately 
by flossing and brushing, "When 



you eat a meal, your teeth get hit 
by a plaque attack for about 20 to 
30 minutes," explains Dr. 
Berman. 

• Some parents may want to 
give their youngsters healthy 
snacks. "I advise parents to give 
sugar-free gum or other sugar- 
free treats, or even fruits such as 
apples or bananas," says Dr. 
Berman. 

Dr. Berman has even talked 
several parents into giving tooth- 
brushes and small tubes of tooth- 
paste. But, he concludes, you can't 
raise a child and take away every- 
thing that is fun. "The keys are 
moderation and parental involve- 
ment," he concludes. 

For more information, contact 
Chris Smith, Director of 
Communications, Chicago Dental 
Society, (312) 836-7330. 



Courtesy of Article Resource 
Association, www.aracopy.com. 



FROM PAGE Bll 



WATER: How safe is bottled water? 



thiil iN.i memht'i of the 
Inii'iiKitional Honied Walei 
Asmh i.ilioii. IHWA. must meel 
iht'seManduids. as well as more 
Mitogen! IHWA requirements. 

At luallv, IHWA member com- 
panies produce iind tlisdibutt* Hf> 
pin fin ol the bottled water sold in 
die U.S. IHWA tons lequcsted thai 
\M hileinaiinnal. a not-lor profit, 
independent pnblii health organi- 
Ailiuu. pertnrni ihe annual inspec- 
tion requited of all IHWA members. 
Heingan independent organi/a 
lion, \M i an lepuii. without l»i,is. 
as to the quality and conlormity til 
a hoiilei'sphml and Uuiliiies. 
Adtlitionalh, \S|- liiieiiialional 
maintains its own honied waier 
t ■eiiilication program that lestsand 
terliiies honied waleis from all over 
the world. 
Packaging 

Some groups have claimed that 



plastic bottles themselves can be 
dangerous and should not be used 
to hold water. But the FDA, which 
authorizes the plastic as a food 
contact material, must approve all 
plastic In which bottled water is 
sold. This means that testing has 
been performed to ensure that the 
plastic container does not contami- 
nate its contents with dangerous 
chemicals. 

Consumers should note, 
though, thai storing bottled water 
next to certain hydrocarbons or 
aromaties, such as dish detergents, 
gasoline, or cleaning fluids, could 
result in chemicals migrating 
through the bottle to contaminate 
the water. 

l-'or greater confidence in the 
safely of the bottled water you buy, 
contact the IHWA, NSF, or any bot- 
tler for a copy of the water analysis 
report that lists the contaminants 



Yury M. Shklyar, M.D. 

FAMILY PRACTICE 
BOARD CERTIFIED 

(847) 548-5063 

X-Ray and Laboratory on Site 



NOW TREATING ACUTE/CHRONIC PAIN WITH 
MATRIX - NON-INVASIVE TREATMENT 




detected in the water, You will dis- 
cover that mosi botded waters only 
contain trace amounts of contami- 
nants, if any at all. 

To contact 1BWA, call 1-800- 
WATER1 1, or visit their Web site at 
www.bottlcdwater.org. You can 
also contact NSF International for 
information on bottled water or 
drinking water filters. Call 1-800- 
673-8010, or visit www.nsf.org. 

NSF International is ihc leading 
certifier of products that impact 
human health. NSF's certification 
process is respected worldwide and 
its expertise was recognized when it 
received the designation of 
Collaborating Center for Drinking 
Water Safety and Treatment from 
the World Health Organization 
(WHO) .—By Michael Miller 

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v hikelandNewspqpersf^Bt'X^ 



HEALTHWATCH 






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When Bonnie Rambo was 
diagnosed with cancer, she 
feared more than the threat 
to her health. She was 
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B1 4 /Lakeland Newspapers 



Give indoor plants some 
much needed attention 



November is now in full swing, 
meaning there is not much 
more lime this your to do out- 
side gardening chores, I hope 
you have put your garden to "bed." so to 
speak. In a few weeks, I'm sure we will 
have had a few good frosts (unfortunately) 
so you can mulch, and lull up ynur roses 
and perennials. Garden tools should he 
stored away, also the garden hose 

I have brought in ail u\ the garden 
plants in containers that I intend to over 
winter, and so far ihey look quite good. It 
is important lu mist your indoor plants 
frequently, because the air inside is mm b 
drier than outside conditions. Plants re- 
spond (o misting, it makes (he tiausjijou 
inside a Jiltle easier on them. II you have 
waited until lei emh to bring in your 
plants, it is a good idea to i bange the soil 
in the conlainers. I his is impni lain l<>r 
two reasons One: il there are any insects 
harbuniiK and diseases, .mil alter all sum 
nier outside the soil probably is stripped 
of all nutrients 

When bringing planis inside, it is a 
good idea lo keep litem in a iiml room 
And, remember when you start healing 
not to havr plant 1 - rinse to vents. Plants 
do not loli-i.tte heating Hell. Continue 
fertilizing \ out plants ovei the winter, 
and trv to pjiiviih' a gjmd smut r ol lighi 
There are main dnmm d.ivs ahead, dn 
provide i*rrifi* 1.1! hgh' Ni \<mi plants 
when needed ! use llottreM ml lighting 
for my plants .is \\ supplement when ihe 




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GARDEN 
JOURNAL 

l.ydia Huff 



sun does not shine. 

t :heek your plants frequently for signs 
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good idea lo spray them with an insecti- 
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usually are hugs in there somewhere. 
Make sure your flowerpots are cleaned, 
keeping them clean prevents plant dis- 
ease. Upon putting your conlainers away 
for the winter, scrub the pots that held 
your annual flowers, then carefully store 
them away for another season. 

To remove salt and clinging earth from 
clay pots, rub them witli steel wool and 
diluted vinegar, ihen soak them ill a 
bleach solution Clean plastic pots with a 
cloth dipped in warm, soapy water. Scrub 
the pots until they are free of soil and 
grime, then soak thorn in a bleach solu- 
tion. 

Well, enjov (he peace of fall. Until next 
lime. 

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November 6, 1998 



Pellet basket is alternative to gas logs 



Despite the continuous "buzz" about gas 
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The interest in gas logs has largely been 
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vided by gas does not replace 
the ambiance created by a 
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the majority still dislike the 
hassle and work associated 
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stacking and lending a wood 
fire. 

I-n ter Prometheus™ 

A new concept, a pellet 
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I lere's how Prometheus works: simply place 
the basket inside a wood stove or fireplace, 
fill with pellets and light. The wire mesh of 
the basket and several "chambers" within the 
basket allow the air to flow in and out, as well 
as through, the basket creating a warm, 
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In as little as three minutes of start-up 
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ket. A full pellet basket holds from 10 pounds 
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size of the basket. 

This new invention bums wood pellets 



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made from natural sawdust which otherwise 
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Because pellets bum hot, they burn clean. 
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burning cordwood. For ex- 
ample, 40 pounds of fuel in 
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erally produces one-to- 
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An added plus for the pel- 
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Wood pellets are now produced by 80 
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Auntsfrombothsl 

... 

by l£SUE PfOTROWSW 
Staff Reporter 

At 2 yeais old, Ryan LaMere ex- 
perienced what no o ne would want 
to experience In a lifetime. His fa- 
ther, Daniel LaMere, killed his 
mother, Nancy, half-sister Lauren 
Mank and half-brother Alex Lowe 
before committing suicide on 
Memorial Day. 

The toddler was In the house 
when tt happened and was found 
the next day by a neighbor. 

Now, he is the focus of an in- 
tense custody battle. Nancy 
LaMere's sister, Jan, and Daniel 



LaMere* sUte*; Dorm t&uxtfe, 
want permanent custody clf^, 
who is currtnUy a\to$ wftfc Jan 
(who prefers to not tm* hw t»* 
name printed) in Ox* Oxmt^ 

•At first they tried to weft* ths 
matter.' said Jan* attorney Mar- 
garet Benson of the Chka8o\\>tun- 
teer Legal Services foundation, 
"But joint custody wasn't possible 
because the Blauvelts Uve in New 
Jersey Both sides feel ihev are the 
best for Ryan.* 

If the Blauvehs receive custody 
of Ryan, Ian is concerned about the 
effect it would haw on the child, 

•Ryan already lost his tanlfyi so 



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Skidmore follows family tradition as next counlY treasurer 



BytESUEPIOTROWSKI 
Staff Reporter 



The Republican candidate 
Robert G. Skidmore won the race for 
Lake County Treasurer with 79,360 
votes, compared to Democrat Lynda. 
Pauls 63,201 votes. He follows in tho 
footsteps of his father, Robert Skid- 
more, Sr., who served as Lake County 
Treasurer in the 1970s and uncle, 
Hugo Schneider, who also served as 
the county's treasurer In the 1950s 
and '60s. 

"My opponent ran a very good 
race with a lot of class," said Skid-' 
more, who h as served as deputy treat- 
surer for 14 years. ..."The items she 
brought up Were very good and she 1 
made me a better candidate for those 
reasons," 

Election night was particularly 
emotional for him. "I was wearing my 



dad* campaign button, and white he 
is no longer with us ho was here In 
spirit," he said. "It was emotional for 
me knowing I was tho third person In 
my family to hold this office." 

When Skidmore takos office on 
Dec 1, ho plans to contlnuo r tin n Inn 
the office In tho mnnnor It has been 
run In the pasi. 

"Nothing will change," ho Haiti, "I 
promised to contlnuo to servo people 
with tho samo friendly service and 
will continue to do that." 



He ftnUI hlx office In already m- 
ting tip a lyitem through which inv 
payer* can \\w credit raid* in (my 
(heir (axes, He milled ihttl (here will 
ho a Kutehnrgo for ilum) who elumiw 
to p«y their tHxrmhls way, 

1 la itl&o hhIiI thai a new lumpui • 
or Hystem will he In nlnt'e In tmpiu\i- 
mutely (wo month i Many thing* thm 
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an upeelal ashesHtnenln, Will he vmv 
puterlKed In onler to »peod tip th» 
procesi, 



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owns 




ELECTION RESULTS 

See who is cheering and 
who Is weeping 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C12 



EQUITABLE TIPS 

Help avoid mistakes in 
securing a home equity loan 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C9 



By RHONDA HETRiCK BURKE 
Managing Editor 

WUlard Helander puts some 
demons to bed TUesday with the de- 
feat of former Lake County Clerk Lin- 
da Hess in a bid for her second term 
in office. 

Riding the coat tails of straight 
Republican party balloting in 1994, 
Helander was often said to have won 
because voters chose the elephant in 
the race. 

With the end of the straight pull, 
Helander showed she has made a 
connection with the voters in her 
first term, 

"We are really excited," Helander 
said, "On the personal side we did 
not pick up the negative slant in the 
campaign. Our only response to 



--■ : v 



negative attacks was to put the facts 
straight.'' -. '...i.:. 

Helander defeated Hess, 80,277 
to 67,905, capturing 54 percent com- 
pared to Hess' 46 percent of the vote. 

She said she looks forward to her 
second term, which should not be 
overshadowed by political rhetoric. 

'1 believe people recognize petty, 
personal politics and attacks don't go 
anywhere," she said. 

Helander will emphasize the 
need to image and preserve vital 
records in her second term as well as 
seek an Improved voter system to 
meet the needs by the year 2001. 

"The current system is outdated. 
It would be foolish to invest in a sys- 
tem that is obsolete and one in 
which we are searching the country 
for spare parts," Helander noted. On 







. 






election night Just two of the (bur 

renders wna working. 

Helander added die election was 
a verification from voters that she 
had done a good job. 

"It was a difficult decision as a 
family to decide to run for reelection, 
because It really impacts your quali- 
ty of life. I'm glad the voters con- 
firmed I had made the right decision. 
It feels good." 

Throughout the campaign, He- 
lander has had a team of three indi- 
viduals working for her reelection. 

"Field Marshal" Venita Mc- 
Connel, mother Eleanor Rooks and 
Lake County Coroner Barbara 
Richardson, her campaign manager. 

"I can't thlnkof anythingshe did- 
n't do in this campaign," said 
Richardson of Helander. "She did 



not use a negative campaign and 

thatpaldoffmrher." 

Challenger Linda Hess made a 
difficult decision a year ago to chal- 
lenge Helander for the post she had 
held for 12 years. She chose no t to 
seek reelection in 1994, opening the 
door for Helander. • 

"I had an excellent organization. 
I had a lot of great workers and vol- 
unteers. We raised a lot of money 
and 1 feel good about that," Hess 
said. "We started in January, if I 
could have started six months earli- 
er, the results may have been differ- 
ent" 

Hess said she felt she ran a very 
construction campaign which 
stayed focused on the issues and not 

Please see INCUMBENT /CIS 




HOLE IN ONE 

Countyhaa changed its 
tune on golf business 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C4 




Above left, Lake County Clerk Candidate Urida Hess looks dis- 
appointingly at the election results Tuesday evening at her cam- 
paign headquarters In Ubertyville. Hess lost the election to in- 
cumbent Wiilard Helander. Above right, after spending most of 



the evening Tuesday in her Lake County Clerk office at the Coun- 
ty Building in Waukegan; monitoring the voting tally, Wiilard He- 
lander has a look of relief after winning her re-election against 
Linda Hess.— Photos by Sandy Bressner 



FOLLOWING THE ACHES OF A CAM-PAIN / C5 



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■ ..• - . .■ ■'—- . ', 



• . - . 






,^,C2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



November 6, 1998 








-'. ■'.: 




itchen Ca 





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A reflection of heart and home. 



Offer available on Diamond Cabinets in their 
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CIO minutes from Gumee Mills) 



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www.hendlriits©@s ,c®om3 E 









Novembers, 1998 



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Lakeland Newspapers COUNTY /C3 



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AT A GLANCE 






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A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT 

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Park Dist. referendum fails 

Wau con da— The song remained the same for Wauconda 
Park District, which 6aw Its 10 cent tax rate increase referen- 
dum fail for the second consecutive election. 

In unofficial election results from the Nov. 3 General Elec- 
tion, the park district's quest to raise money for capital Im- 
provement projects failed by a 65.2 percent to 34.8 percent 
margin. In 10 precincts, 139 no votes were cast against 742 
yes votes. 

"We are disappointed In the results of the election," said 
Nancy Burton, director of the Park District, speaking on elec- 
tion night "We feel the rate we were asking for was the lowest 
rate possible to accomplish what we wanted to accomplish," 
Burton said. 

Beaubien wins reelection 

St Rep. 52nd Disc— State Rep. Mark H. Beaubien, Jr. (R- 
Barrington) was reelected to a second full two-year term in 
unofficial vote totals from the Nov. 3 general election, easily 
defeating challenger Bill Husko (D-Mundelein). 

In unofficial results, Beaubien, 55, received 66.58 percent 
of the vote, with 20340 votes, compared with Husko, 69, who 
received 33.42 percent of the vote, with 1 0,208 votes. 

"I was really quite confident," Beaubien said. "I worked 
very hard, I took the election seriously. I feel I have demon- 
strated I care for people in my district" 

Husko was at a loss to know why he did not fare better. "I 
don ' t know because I have done everything I thought was 
right," he said. 

Student appointed as trustee 

Fox Lake— Grant Township High School Senior Alan 
Prouty has become the youngest trustee in the Village of Fox 
Lake, and is among the youngest individuals to serve in an 
elected office across the country. 

Prouty, 18, was appointed by Mayor Jim Pappas to fill the 
unexpired term of former Trustee Alberta Meyer at the Nov. 2 
Fox Lake Board meeting. His term will expire in six months 
during the first week In May of 1999. 

"I wanted to learn more and play a role within the village 
board," Prouty said of his reason for applying for the position. 
"I wanted to take part in the community and show people an 
18 year old can do the job just like everyone else." 

That is what Pappas said people had told him at a rate of 
two to one. "An 18 year old who can vote for us should be al- 
lowed to sit up here with us," Pappas said. 

Johnsburg schools win big 

Johnsburg— Happy days and nights are ringing all 
throughout Johnsburg Community Unit School District 12, as 
voters resoundingly approved a referendum to provide $11.85 
million to construct 34 classrooms while maintaining the dis- 
trict's tax rate. 

in unofficial returns, 60.51 percent of the vote was in favor 
of the referendum, with 2,245 votes, while 39.49 percent was 
against, with 1,465 votes. 

Dr. Robert Gough, District 12 superintendent, said the 
school board had worked hard the past four years to scale 
down its failed 1994 referendum in almost half the amount, 
while also receiving state support and having success in meet- 
ing the goals of the community and communicating with 
them. 

"Now that it has been approved, it has brought out an 
overall global satisfaction," Gough said. With the voters ap- 
proval in hand, district officials can now proceed with selling 
$1 1 .85 million in bonds and prepare building plans for addi- 
tions at each district building in the next two years. "Fall 2000 
everybody should be able to move in," Gough said. 

Street brawl leads to three arrests 

Libertyviile— A brawl broke out Sunday night, Nov. 1 , in 
the parking lot of Wholesale Carpet Designs, 1470 S. Milwau- 
kee, Libertyviile. 

Alvin Cassel, 26, of Waukegan; Gregory Draper, 37, of 
North Chicago and Leysa Draper, 23, of North Chicago were 
all arrested for their roles in the fight. 

Cassel and Leysa Draper are both employees of Manor- 
Care Health Services in Libertyvilie. The two had earlier had a 
heated dispute over the care of one of the patients. When the 
two say each other in public later the fight broke out. Fists, a 
hammer, repellant spray and a bottle were all used as 
weapons in the altercation. 



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Commuters can't escape tolls 

The Deerfield toll booth at the Junction of routes 294 
and 94 became dismantled recently raising the prices 
of the Waukegan, Touhy and Irving Park tolls.— Pho- 
to by Sandy Bressner 



All three were charged with battery for their part In the 
fight. Gregory Draper was charged with assault and both Cassel 
and Leysa Draper were charged with criminal damage to prop- 
erty. 

Dist. 114 referendum voted down 

Foot take— It's back to the drawing board for Fox Lake Ele- 
mentary School District 1 14 as voters In Fox Lake decided not 
to approve a $123 million referendum that would have closed 
both Lotus and Forest elementary schools and brought a new 
wing to Stanton School 

By a total of 1,020 yes votes to 1,1 14 no votes, voters in the 
Fox like Elementary School District 1 14 voted to not approve 
the referendum during the November elections held Tuesday. 

Some of the main concerns that went with the new school 
was the $12.3 million price tag that went with the addition, the 
bond payment structure would not keep tax rates where the 
board was saying it would and many people felt that condens- 
ing all the students at one site was not beneficial to either 
younger or older students, 

"I've seen the board very committed to this plan," said 
Michael Lescher, vice president of Dist 1 14. "1 do not see the 
board abandoning it or making any major changes to the origi- 
nal plan, but we will revisit it and make a few minor adjust- 
ments." 

Proposed indoor skate park denied 

libertyviile- A proposed indoor skate park for aggressive 
skating was denied Oct. 27 by the Libertyviile village board 
dashing the hopes of many youths in attendance. 

Aggressive skating is skating on ramps, Inclines and other 
obstacles. 

Had the special use permit passed the proposed facility 
would have been located in what was formerly a warehouse at 
1800 Temple Drive. 

The reason the proposal came before the board was be- 
cause the site does not have enough parking spaces for the pro- 
posed use and any added parking spaces would have been in 
violation of other ordinances. 

The proposal needed four out of the five trustees to vote in 
favor. With Trustee Gary Franzen and Trustee Jeffrey Harger 
voting against it the proposal failed three votes fo two, 

Jeff Cleveland, the man proposing the skate park, is a 
Mundelein resident and said he will continue to look in the 
area for another potential site. 

GCHS referendum approved 

Grayslake— It's official. Grayslake High School's $20 mil- 
lion referendum question squeaked by with a narrow margin of 
75 votes. Of the voters who cast their ballot, 3,943 said yes and 
3,868 said no. The Grayslake High School referendum commit- 
tee celebrated their win after being on tenterhooks all evening 
on Nov. 3. 

"I tell you, I think I lost a few hairs tonight!" said Grayslake 






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High School Superintendent Ray Novak, who watched the ; 
election numbers change slowly until 1 a.m. "I tliink getting . 
out the word of the $4,1 million rebate from the state was an! 
important step,":" :. ■ ■ 

District 12? will remodel parts of the high school, add on, 
and buy a new parcel of land with the money from the refer- 
endum. Since the referendum passed, the district will receive; 
the capital development loan of 4.1 million promised by the 
state, reducing the overall debt to tax payers from $20 million 
to $15.9 million. ' 

State Rep. Moore elected 

LtbertyvOle— In a landslide Republican Andrea Moore 
has once again won the District 61 State Representative race. 

Moore received 20,134 votes to beat out her opponent 
Geraldlne Callan who received 8,503 votes. "I was elated," 
Moore said of the victory. 

This will be Moore's fourth term and she said she was con- 
fident going intojhe election. "I have been in office for some 
time," she said. "I was hopeful that would serve me welL 

"1 have a good established record," Moore said. Another 
reason she has received so much support is because she makes 
herself so accessible. 

In her upcoming term Moore said she will continue to fight 
against leaf burning. Moore said many proponents of leaf 
burning see it as a nostalgic custom or as an efficient means of 
disposal She said she sees leaf burning as a definite health risk. 

McCarley wins Dist. 2 seat 

Wadsworlb— Republican Loretta McCarley was elected 
to the Lake County board District 2 seat left vacant by Robert 
Neal. McCarley received 3,416 votes to democrat Jeanne He- 
witt's 2,482 for the spot 

"This is really going to be a new experience," McCarley 
said. 

She said she was confident going into the election be- 
cause she had run a good primary and felt the constituents 
were In her favor. 

The fact she was able to get out information about who 
she is and what she stands for is one of the reasons she thinks 
she attracted voters, McCarley said. 

"We sent out a lot of personal letters and talked with a lot 
of people on a one-on-one basis," she said. 

That presence got across the message that she will be 
there to listen to the constituents of the district, she said. Even 
though she may not always agree with someone's point of 
view she said she will certainly listen to all points of view. 

Voters accept tax increase 

Grayslake— Fire Chief Don Mobley breathed a sigh of re- 
lief as the poll results finally came in. Voters accepted a tax in- 
crease from 1.7 percent to 45.7 percent for the 1998 levy year, 
providing sorely needed funds to the Grayslake Greater Fire 
Protection District 

"I am so pleased. At least we can talk seriously now since 
we have the money" said Mobley, speaking of the district's 
plan to purchase land for a new fire station. "We have been 
living a minimalist life here at the fire station." 

A difference of 188 votes made the race close, with 3,750 
yes votes to 3,562 no's. Historically, the fire district has not 
had a tax increase since they first started operations. 

Antioch votes to improve library 

Antioch— Antioch voters said "yes" on Tuesday for addi- 
tional library materials. 

They said "yes" for new computers and other patron ser- 
vices. They said "yes" for saving money for future growth and 
building enhancements. 

On Tuesday, Nov. 3, there were 2,810 voters, 52.1 1 per- 
cent, who said the Antioch Public Library District tax rate 
should be increased 8.5 cents to 25.5 cents per $100 of as- 
sessed valuation. There were 2,582 people, 47.89 percent, 
who said no. 

"I'm very, very pleased," said Library District President 
Ann Kakacek. "How could anyone not be pleased?" 

"We have to respect the people who say no because they 
took the time to vote," said Kakacek. "And, we delight in the 
people who voted yes." 

Kakacek said that the effort to pass the referendum had 
some additional benefits. The Antioch Library Friends group 
was a delight to work with. The library board came together 
as a stronger group. She said that it was a wonderful experi- 
ence to work with the library staff. 



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C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



November 6, 1998 



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Lakeland Newspapers 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



William M. Schroeder 

Prmidont/C.E.0. 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/Composition Mgr. 



Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Graysloke, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (647) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@tnd.com 



EDITORIALS 

See multi-university 

opening new 

horizons 

Now thiii the fall elerliou is hiMory. public debute likely 
will swing to the location of tin- Lake County rntilti- 
uttivffsiiy. :i bu iliiy the SIMP Hnnrd of Higher J-tlura- 
tion envisions as providing far I ake County's higher 
eduialioii iicocls without esiahlishing a new four-year j school. 

I he educational cenler. planned to lie operational by 2000, 
will he .i place where a number of insiilulions can hold classes 
teniinifi lo decrees I he mint, -university [we hope someone can 
ciime up with a less cumbersome name) will open up options for 
lot »l simleiils to c nmplele degree programs without leaving 
hmne 

I ou es m W.uikegan and Miriuli'lem already are at work lo 
^.iiii the Limvrisity building (.niyslake also has been men 
tinned bin aiiM' id the main t ampus n( the College of Lake Coun- 

i\ In itie e.nlv g g. at least, the News Sun building in down 

ion n \V.uikc[ian has been mentioned as a gnt*d location. 
Minuleliiii i-. talking up the vacant formei Inlernatiotia] Miner- 
ii U i my I ■■ ■.idi|traileis sit oat eil mi a i am|>us like setting olf Hie 

i:. 

I in:' oi aestlieli* \impmul, the Muitdclein locatiun likely 
will s-.e: -iMmg li.u km)', Wauki'nan. without a doubt, i an aigue 
Inn i!>'.\ lial student needs .md Mippuiimgintiastructuic can 
i ,ii i\ 'i ■.• d.i\ state s.t'ii Win 1 ink lit Veiium 1 lillsl favors 
W.u.k. .;an ami h die tn-i elei ted ollutal lo speak nut fm a site. 
. uMi-vet the miv. the new m hool will add gieudy to die lus- 
ts" -.ke i ihui!\ ahi',ul\ ha* Im highei education A doyen insii 
:..' Hi" ..be.uh ollei courses at various locarions around the 
county I Jut nimiher rnuld easily double at the university cen- 
ter Coupled ividi the four year degree schools presently avail- 
able, few localities in die nation will he ahle to offer such a 
hreadtli and variety ml higher education opportunities. 



r 

Blowing the whistle 
on train whistles 

Dogs bark. Cats prowl. Trains blow whistles. Those are 
among die irrefutable facts of life. Unless you live in 
the United States, where citi/.ens can always turn lo a 
malable government more than willing to negate, or at 
least turn back, some of those irrefutable realities. 

In Lake County, criss-crossed as it is north, easl, south and 
west by railroad tracks, whistle blowing trains are a constant ir- 
ritant lo a segment of the populace. Its difficult to find any- 
place in this county that is not within earshot of a train whistle. 
So there always seems to be someone blowing die whislle on 
train whistles. 

hnler front and center, Glenadine Ihipperl of Antioch. who is 
leading a one woman charge against train whistles, Antioch has 
an unusually large number of crossings. Hence, a lot of whislle 
blowing. More than ever now with die success of commuter ser- 
vice on the Wisconsin Central, 

Ruppert is an advocate of crossing gates, huppert is con- 
vinced irain whistles can be silenced without a sacrifice of life 
and limb, Antioch Village Attorney Kenneth Clark says the vil- 
lage has no legal right lo ban train whistles. Clark also has at 
hand a 1991 Florida study showing thai the train-vehicle acci- 
dent rate jumped 300 percent when train engineers slopped 
blowing their whistles. 

As we mentioned, our government likes to get involved in is- 
sues like train whistles. A federal agency is getting ready to re- 
lease an impact statement and will be conducting hearings. 
Dragged into ihe controversy, Congressman Phjl Crane sagely 
pointed out the risky business of predicting what may come out 
of the federal inquiry. 

We must confess that we don't share Ms. Ruppert's antipathy 
toward train whistles. We sort of like them. The whistles help 
us wake up. They warn us to get out of the way of trains. A 
blowing train whistle is a signal that all is well in America. Not 
that Ms. Ruppert doesn't have a right to blow the whistle on train 
whistles. She most certainly does. As Congressman Crane 
pointed out, this whole thing about train whistles is risky busi- 
ness. 



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WELL SON, DeWftfWlS 



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VIEWPOINT 



County golf big, 
to get bigger in '99 



S 



uess. 



nme years ago, a powerful 
politician remarked, "Lake 
County has no business be- 
ing in the golf course busi- 



1 hat was then and Uiis is now. 
Not only is I ffite County government 
in die golf i out se business, there isa 
last 1 1 at k ahead lliat would vault 
l.ake ( ;ounty into die rarified air of 
having one of the nation's top public 
golf courses. Maybe even No. 1. 

All die ingredients for premier 
slat us are available atThunderHawk 
C iolf Club, the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' new 18-hole champi- 
onship course located on I /wis Ave. 
between 29lh and 33rd streets in 
Beach Park and Zion. 

ThunderHawk, ready to open 
for play in the spring of 1999, will be 
the fourth Forest Preserve course, 
joining brae Loch at Cages Like, 
Countryside at Mundelein and l : i. 
Sheridan. The 243 acre layout con- 
tains hardwood woodlands, pristine 
wetlands and carefully resiored na- 
tive prairie. Fairways cover more 
than 50 acres. There are more than 
85 sand traps. 

Designers were so sensitive, lo 
the environment that players will 
gel a free drop at certain spots when 
errant shots sail into proiecied ar- 
eas. There is water, too, su he well- 
stocked with balls. This duffer al- 
ready has decided thai it'll lake 
more than a few rounds next spring 
to get prepared forThunderhawk. 
Dan Prezell, director of Forest 
Preserve revenue facilities and de 
factor golf manager, is as exciled 
about Thunderhawk as a newly per- 
mitted teenage driver wiih a high 
performance sports car. "This is it. 
We're headed for the big time. 
There'll be major pro tournaments 
here in a few years," Prezell enthus- 
es. 

The crowning glory at Thunder- 
hawk will be a 10,000 square fool 
club house buili of rough sawed 
cedar and field slone, and topped an 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



authentic shake roof. Flanking the 
ample pro shop will be men's and 
women's lockerrooms. A bar over- 
looking the 18th hole will connect 
players' facilities to a dining room 
with banquet seating for 300 per- 
sons. 

In conducting this observer on a 
tour. Prezell did not make a single 
reference to "playing" Thunder- 
hawk. Golfers will "experience" 
Thunderhawk. Lake County's new 
golfing jewel will be that kind of 
course. 

I can'! image what that venera- 
ble pol is thinking now about county 
government being in the golf course 
Imsiness. 'Hint's not important. 
What is important that current For- 
esl Preserve leadership is of a mind 
to extend golfing at the highest lev- 
• els lo ihe widest number of persons 
as possible without any cost to lax- 
payers. 

Like (he other loreM Preserve gttl& 
ing properties, magnificent Thun- 
derhawk will be cnl h cly self sup- 
ported. 

Weight watchers 

Retiring State Rep. Hob Churchill 
(R-Lake Villa), shed 25 pounds this 
summer. Bob vowed to rid himself 
of five more pounds to be at his 
weight when first elected lo the Illi- 
nois General Assembly 1 6 years ago. 
Thin-as-a-rail Al Salvi reported that 



his campaign for secretary of state 
cost him only five pounds; his bid 
for the U.S. Senate two years ago 
took 20 pounds off his lean frame, 

Deerfield delight 

Yeeessss! Regular commuters are 
taking fiendish delight in rolling 
through the one-dme Deerfield Toll 
Plaza at near regular drive-Ume 
speeds. In typical Illinois State Toll 
Highway Authority anogance, a 
spokesperson described a no toll 
edict as a "peace offering," Only a 
few long-time commuting regulars 
remember the original Tollway 
Authority pledge of dispensing with 
tolls once theTri-State bonds were 
paid. Oh, yeah.. 

Stream of coats 

Karen Kuester, in charge of the 
Lakeland Newspapers reception 
desk, and classified advertising ac- 
count executive Joyce Hill are doing 
an inhouse version of Coats for 
Chicago, a cooperative effort of 
Chicagoland Chrysler-Plymouth 
Dealers and the Salvation Army to 
collect winter garments for the 
needy throughout the metro area 
Karen and Joyce encourage other 
Lake County businesses do join the 
effort that is being backed by NBC. 
The coat chain will extend all the 
way to Soldier Field where final con- 
irlbutions will be received Sunday, 
Dec. 27, at die Bears/Green Bay 
game. 

Allendale accolade 

Jay Proops of Wilmette, board 
chairman of Allendale School, 
Lake Villa, was honored at the Al- 
lendale Assn. annual meeting for 
nearly two decades of service. He 
commented that helping the 
school, nationally known for Its 
residential treatment for at risk 
boys and girls, never seems like a 
chore, "I 've always considered it a 
privilege," he noted. 



Guest commentaries welcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns by our readers on topics of general Interest, Anyone 
interested in writing a column can contact Publisher W.H. Schroeder at (847) 223-8161 Submissions 
may be mailed c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake IL, 60030 orfax to (847) 223-8810. 
Deadline is Friday at noon. v ' 



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November 6, 1998 



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C30 f Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November.6, 1998 







k^tv 








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OF THE 

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NINTH ANNUAL 

SPRUCE MOOSE CRAFT I 
BAZAAR 

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Nov. 21 9am -5pm 



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Tuxedo is this month's Pet ol the Monlh. 

She is a 3-year-old. part Lab part 

PttDull who was rescued from a pound 

in Florida. Recently she was given as a 

gill to 4-year-old Taylor Tomal who 

resides in Johnsourrj. 

November, 1998 



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Is your pel a star? 

Send us a picture and 
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PET OF THE MONTH! 

Send us your favorite photo and any 

information about the pet you would like to 

see mentioned to 

Lakeland Publishers, 

Attn: Classified PET OF THE MONTH, 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, Illinois 60030. 

Sorry, photos cannot be returned. 

All Information id subject to editing. 

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November 6, 1998 



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OPINIONS 




Lakeland Newspapers I C5 



. . . 



A jig for the clerk 

Eleanor Rooks, center, mother of Willard Helander dances a jig with Lake County Coroner Barbara 
Richardson, left, campaign manager and Venita McConnel, right, at the Helander campaign head- 
quarters In Ubertyville upon hearing Helander had won reelection. Rooks spent 100 days In Lake 
County helping her daughter. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 

Geo wows audience at 
tribute for Churchill 




■ ■-.-;, '■■> ■ . (■ -'■■-■ 



State Senator Adeline Geo- 
Karis (R-Zlon) noted for her 
energy and wit, was in rare 
form at a tribute for retiring 
State Rep. Bob Churchill (R-Lake Vil- 
la) almost turning the event into a 
mini-roast. 

When he was making his first 
race for the Legislature, Geo re- 
counted, "Bobby showed me his 
campaign brochure. It was terrible. I 
rewrote it on the spot. Then, 1 even 
had to pick up the tab for lunch." 

A smiling and relaxed Churchill 
responded with a story about how a 
trip to Springfield with the Senator 
Geo-Karis turned Into a day— and 
night adventure. 

"First, there were about three 
pancake breakfasts to attend. Then 
we hit a couple of spaghetti lunches, 
followed by several anniversary 
open houses, Churchill related. "It 
was about midnight when he finally 



got to Springfield and Adeline want- 
ed to go out for dinner. Churchill 
had a throng at Maravella's howling 
with the revelation that Geo-Karis 
dozed off— twice— listening to a 
tape recording of Kate Smith singing 
"God Bless America" on the long dri- 
ve to the state capitol. 

Churchill kept his response to 
the accolades brief, telling friends at 
the dinner sponsored by the Antioch 
Township Republican Club, "I 
should be thanking you for the op- 
portunity of serving you for 16 
years." 

Bye, bye Bob 

There was no skullduggery In- 
volved in the ouster of Building Offi- 
cer Bob "I make the rules" Streicher, 
second banana in the Lake County 
Building, Planning and Zoning 
Dept. The undoing was Streicher's 
$104,000 annual salary. "That's more 



than the elected officials make. 
Enough is enough," groused one 
County Board member. The axe fell 
on Streicher at a budget meeting. 

No double dipping 

Antioch Township Supervisor 
Tim Osmond had his mind made up 
long before election day that if elect- 
ed state representative he would re- 
sign the township post he has held 
for 18 months. Osmond could legal- 
ly hold both jobs. 

So long V 

Independent Republicans are 
vowing to retire County Board 
Chairman Bob Grever (R-Kildeer) 
as a one termer. As die counting 
took place for Nov. 3 balloting, they 
were strategizing about alliances 
with newly elected Democrats. 
Look for fireworks about die chair- 
man's job. 



" • 

he Lyndon B. Johnson . . 
award for the cheapest shot 
taken during our recent . 
election campaign goes to 
... the envelope please ... Illinois 
Congressman Glenn Poshard. 

If you've never heard of the LB J 
award maybe it's because I just now 
made it up. I'm sorry, but when I 
think of that former president dirty 
politics immediately conies to mind. 

Poshard, running for governor 
and trailing in the polls to his oppo- 
nent, Secretary of State George 
Ryan, sought political gain from the 
deaths of six children. 

He blamed Ryan for a freak 
minivan -truck accident that took 
the children's lives, saying Ryan's de- 
partment allowed an unqualified 
Illinois truck driver to obtain a com- 
mercial driver's license, although 
Poshard 's campaign offered no 
proof of that being the case. 

It was a far-fetched accusation, a 
deceptive tactic unworthy of some- 
one who wants to be our governor. 
Where, when you need them, are 
politicians with the integrity of retir- 
ing governor Jim Edgar and retired 
Sen. Alan Dixon? Why can't we have 
more candidates with the courage 
and dignity to remain above the fray, 
beyond the mudslinging? 

It was Henry Kissinger who ob- 
served, "Ninety pe rcent of the po li ti - 
cians give the other 10 percent a bad 
reputation." 

Ryan didn't conduct a squeaky- 
clean campaign either. He spent 
several million dollars on negative 
ads against Poshard, including the 
inference the congressman would 
be willing to arm gangbangers who 
could invade our neighborhoods. 

Too often, candidates are willing 
to play loose with the truth. Their 
opponents' voting records and 
stands on issues are twisted and tak- 
en out of context. And too often we 
find ourselves faced with voting for 
the lesser of two evils. 

It has been said that politics 
consists of choosing between the 
disastrous and the unpalatable. 

A desperate Carol Mosley- 




CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



\ 



Braun, asking voters for another she 
years in the U.S. Senate, also 
stooped to hitting below the belt 
Trailing in the polls to her opponent, 
State Sen. Peter Fitzgerald, she re- 
sorted to attack ads that gave the 
false impression Fitzgerald favored 
sending to prison women who have 
abortions in cases of rape and in- 
cest Her deceptive ads came com- 
plete with illustrations of coat 
hangars. 

Mosely-Braun's backers, includ- 
ing Chicago Mayor Richard Daley, 
accused Fitzgerald of negative cam- 
paigning. But how could a person 
discuss Mosely-Braun's six years as a 
senator, which according to various 
Illinois newspapers has been "em- 
barrassing, sneaky, and hard to 
trust," without being negative? 

It was Mark Twain who said, 
"Suppose you were an idiot and 
suppose you were a member of 
Congress. But I repeat myself." 

Getting back to the tactics of 
Lyndon Johnson, Barry Goldwater 
wrote this in his autobiography: 
"Johnson was the epitome of the un- 
principled politician, a dirty fighter 
and treacherous. He'd slap you on 
the back today and stab you in the 
back tomorrow." 

Indeed, during the 1964 presi- 
dential campaign, in vicious televi- 
sion commercials Johnson branded 
Goldwater as a trigger-happy war- 
monger and a nuclear madman. 

"The voters thought I was going 
to blow up the world," Goldwater re- 
flected. And they handed the presi- 
dency to Johnson by a landslide. 

Some of this year's Blinois can- 
didates got all muddy competing for 
my LBJ award; I wish I could throw 
in a towel for them. 



Letters to the Editor 

Besides traditional mailed letters, Lakeland Newspapers 

accepts letters by fax and E-mail. Limit letters to 250 words 

and include your name, address and daytime phone on all letters. 

• Fax:(847)223-8810 

• Letter: P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL. 60030 

• E-mail: edit@lnd.com 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Thank you Private Ryan 



Two hundred and twenty 
two years ago, a few thou- 
sand ragged Private Ryans 
stepped forward and won 
our freedom from the oppression of 
British Rule. Since that time, 
through a variety of wars large and 
small, millions of Private Ryans have 
stood up and answered the call to 
preserve and defend our freedoms 
from those who were determined to 
take them away. 

To all these Private Ryans, we are 
indebted and thankful. But perhaps 
this movies' greatest value is to re- 
mind our younger citizens, that 
these freedoms they take for grant- 
ed, are not entitlements but rather 
privileges earned at great sacrifice 
by the generations of Private Ryans 
who have gone before them. That as 



heirs of these freedoms they too 
must be willing to stand up and be 
counted should they be called upon. 
For only through the recognition of 
this responsibility will our privileged 
way of life be preserved for the fu- 
ture. 

Tom Milliard 

VFW Post 2245 

Grayslake 

Time to preserve 

Living In Lindenhurst It is hard 
to ignore all of the commercial and 
residential development that has oc- 
curred in Lake County over the past 
few years, but I think now it has 
gone too far. Everywhere fields are 
being plowed over to make way for 
more houses or strip malls. It stared 
innocently with houses and a strip 



mall being put up on Grass Lake 
Road, but now Grass Lake Road is 
overflowing with freshly built houses 
and the developers have made their 
way to Sand Lake Road. It seems like 
everyday there Is another subdivi- 
sion cropping up on Route 45, and 
now a subdivision is beginning to 
spring up on Hunt Club Road. 

My point is that it is sickening 
that there has to be so many subdi- 
visions going up. What ever hap- 
pened to the farms and nice open 
space? It is almost non-existent now 
that the developers have run amuck. 
I understand that there general in- 
flux In population for all of Lake 
County, but things have gone too far. 
Everyone needs to step back and re- 
member what Lindenhurst and any 
other place in Lake County used to 



look like and then decide to preserve 
what is left. 

Monica Basche 
Lindenhurst 

Grayslake best site 

With respect to the proposed 
Multi- University Center for Lake 
County, in my opinion it should be 
built in Grayslake. As a lifelong Lake 
County resident and mother of two 
children, I truly believe that 
Grayslake is the best site for this ed- 
ucational facility. 

Since Grayslake is the home to 
the College of Lake County campus, 
theater and library already, it would 
seem that would be an important 
factor in deciding the future location 
of the University Center. The Village 
of Grayslake also offers a more cen- 



tral and easily accessible location 
that the other potential sites, as well 
as begin close to Lake County's pop- 
ulation center. 

Grayslake is a well-established 
community with good schools and 
housing choices that would also ap- 
peal to University Center faculty, 
students and staff. Finally, Grayslake 
has shown its continued support for 
the arts and civic organizations in 
addition to education. 

My family and I encourage other 
Lake County residents, the Lake 
County Board members, and mem- 
bers of the Illinois Legislature to 
bring the University Center to 
Grayslake. 

Therese Schaefer 

Libertyvdle 



- 



LIPSERVICE 






- - 



C6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



November 6, J998 



Get it off your chest (847)223-8073 

Fax (847) 223-8810 e-mail: lipsenice@lpnews.com 



IHIS WEEK'S QUESTIONIS: 






BB(M*.u«' 



Upservtce Is a phone-In column presented as a feature of Lakeland Newspapers. Lake- 
land Newspapers makes no claim to the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland News- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the light to edit copy or to refrain 
from printing a message. Call In at 223-8073, fax In at 223-8810, or e-mail at Ifpser- 
vlce@lpnews.com and leave your message 24-hours a day. Callers must leave their 
name, phone number and village name. Names and phone numbers will not be printed; 
however, callers maybe called for verification. 



Where's the traffic lights? 

On Sepc, 4. 1996, a petition was start- 
ed and signed by residents of Widow 
Ridge Three to get a traffic light on 
Rollins and Nicole because of the 
safety factor. Concrete has been 
poured, electric has been done, and 
now we're told it will be soon. Let's 
pray no one will be hurt and maybe 
Dusty Powell will finish what was |_g3Vg f|jjj] jft 
started. I'm a disgusted resident. 

Round l/ikc ttmch 



pie drive up to a house and run in 
and out. She jusi described half the 
houses in the United States with 
teenagers. My neighbor has a bunch 
of teenagers and have kids coming 
and going all the time and they are a 
dmg-free house. I think it was wrong 
ofhertosaythat. 

Spring (irmv 



Stop, look—and listen! 

I'm calling about the man who lives 
off Route 59 in Lake Villa an Migh- 
woods Drive who has a red van. I'd 
like to say we are very sick of you not 
listening to us. The place where you 
keep parking your van is for mothers 
to drop their kids off so they don't get 
hit by cars. It was created by us and 
we don't appreciate you not listening 
to us. Please listen to us and don't do 
thai anvmore. 

Isikv IWrt 

Houses vs. wetlands 

1 was just wondering. Antioch has re- 
served a special place for wetlands. 
They should have wetlands in 
Gurnee. mo. They've j»cit all these 
houses built around here. Depke and 
Wellon have certainly tilled their 
pockets. There's no place for the 
wildlife to go. TJiey ought (o tear half 
the houses down because more than 
half are empty and make a place for 
the wildlife to live. As far as coyotes 
bothering animals, they ought 10 
keep their animals in or get their 
heavy butts off the couch and walk 
them, 

Gurnee 

Crabby the grouch 

I'm calling about one lady in partic- 
ular on Larkdale. She's been there for 
years and years and all she does is 
crab and complain and calls the vil- 
lage and police to complain about 
anything and everything. She has 
run out all the other people. People 
who had a business in their home, 
she tried to tear them down. 1 hope 
she's happy, no one is even talking to 
her anymore. Wc all hope she 
moves. 

Wcuicotula 



1 was just reading about I he new 
Mideast peace accord that was 
signed the other day. I'm thinking 
what a wonderful thing it is we're in 
such a rush to impeach Clinton. If he 
had a few more years in office, he 
might end up solving all the world's 
problems. 

l.indenhursl 

Underfunded 

The referendum for Fox Like for the 
schools is vastly underfunded. The 
57 they say will never pay off the debt 
we owe on those bonds. 

Pax hike 

Speeding bus 

District 9f> School District in Dike 
County's school buses speed down 
our street. It seems all right with the 
police chief, the mayor and the su- 
perintendent of schools, but it's not 
okay with the residents. 1 was behind 
bus ttZti going 20 mph and it was way 
ahead of me. And (hose are big bus- 
es to be rushing up and down narrow 
streets, with homes pretty close to 
the streets. 1 guess if dicy're not rush- 
ing up and down their streets, they 
don't care about the rest of us. 

Lake Zurich 



Skeptical 



Think of others 



Fall is here and people are burning 
leaves and fireplaces. Do you not re- 
alize that people with heart prob- 
lems and allergies are suffering, not 
to mention all the carbon dioxide in 
the air? Sometimes we can hardly 
breathe, even if we're on the upstairs 
level of the house. If your kids are 
constantly on medication because of 
ear infections and runny noses, it's 
because the air is dirty. That's why 
we have electric and gas heat and 
people don't use wood to heat our 
homes. Let's not even talk about the 
destruction of ourforests. So be a re- 
sponsible citizen and only burn 
wood and leaves when necessary. 
Think about other people. 

Unknown 

Wrong thing to say 

I'm calling in regard to the article on 
the Ingle side residents' march 
against drugs and crime. What 
they're doing is wonderful and I'm 
all for it But the lady that started this, 
her quote In the paper about how it's 
easy to spot a drug house, when peo- 



1 am very skeptical of die new Emis- 
sions Control check station that will 
be imposed on the residents of 
northern Lake County. The first 
problem is thai you will be assigned 
a time of their choosing, often during 
the lime when everyone works. To 
gel a lime that fits your schedule, you 
need to pay a fee. Thanks a lot. Sec- 
ond, why doesn't all the constniction 
equipment that operates here in 
Uke County, have to be tested like us 
motorists? 1 constantly see billows of 
smoke and pollution coming from 
various dump trucks and bulldozers. 
If motorists have to play ihe bureau- 
cracy game, so should they. Third, if 
diey really want to control emissions, 
they should start the regulations at 
ihe point of manufacture, not the 
point of usage. Thai would cut out a 
lot of these patronage jobs at the 
emissions station, wouldn't it? 

Antioch 



Clinton spi 




ing our senators and congressmen store In Round Lake Beach? 

why they have let many other states, Enough's enough; What happened 

especially southern states, who have to the Old Countiy Buffet that was 

power, and we're contribuUngall the supposed to be put in next to Pep 

money and it's not coming back to Boys? Now vi6 have a Hobby Lobby, 

us. We need a president from the We need more good restaurants in 
northern states. 

Unknown 



crafters were set up. the food was 
free Fven the gazebo was done and 
in place for a ribbon cutting ceremo- 
ny But where were the people? Why 
wasn't this event in Fox Uke more 
publicized by fivers, newspaper arti- 
cles, or even a banner running across 
the town cenier? If you knew about 
this and didn'i attend, shame on 
you. Whv are we not supporting our 

Fox Dike town 81 »" t' v ' pnt like tnis? 

Fox l/tke 

Good thing 

It's a good thing taxpayers defeated 
the private health club and pool ref- 
erendum in (irayslake, because now 
we need big referendums for (he 
school and fire department, which is 
a heck of a lot more important. Vil- 
lage manager Hllis was wrong in 
pushing a weak mayor to add $11 
million with interest to our debi, 
knowing we needed classrooms and 
a new fire station, which alone will 
raise our taxes over $250 a year. So 
much for leadership in this town. 

Grayslake 

Do better next time 

Looking at the paper of Friday, Oct. 
2.1. about Grant Homecoming 
Queefi, with more pictures on A 14. 1 
didn't recognize anyone on page 
AM.lt was a disappointment for the 
students with rain, and then no pic- 
tures of the queen and court or 
floats? This is our high school, please 
do belter than that nexl year. 

Ingleside 

Thanks for time, donations 

I would like lo thank everyone who 
donated their time to sell red ribbons 
for the Antioch High School this past 
weekend for the MADD campaign. 
Also, to the community for allowing 
us to present ourselves in stores and 
on street comers, and also a special 
thanks to all those who donated to 
our cause. It will go to the post-prom 
function this year. 

Antioch 

Great job, Fox Lake 

I'd just like to commend the Vil- 
lage of Fox Lake for resurfacing 
and widening Liverpool Road, Lip- 
pincoit Lane, and Fern Court Ii 
was a very difficult task. 1 would 
wake up early lo go lo work, and 
every morning, rain or shine, ihcy 
would be out there working. There 
were a couple of weeks of really 
bad weather, and the roads were 
just awful. Some people couldn't 
even get through, the village went 
out and collected all of it into pick 



■ 



Fix tracks once and for all 

I'm calling about the railroad tracks 
at the intersection of Route 134 and 
Fairfield Road in Round Lake. It's ter- 
rible. They went to fix them about 3- 
4 months ago, but they didn't re- 
place them like they should have. 



this town. The town Is getting bigger 
and bigger and there's only one new 
restaurant, Applebee's, We need 
more. 

Round Lake Beach 

Don't print unknowns 

1 just read the "Be a Pepper" message 
In last LipservJce and the town was 
unknown. I don't think you should 



You have to come to a complete stop print anyone's message If they don't 



to crawl over these tracks. I live on a 
street that's been paved two years in 
a row. Why do they do this when it's 
unnecessary, but yet not fix tracks 
that hundreds of people drive over 
every day? Hopefully someone will 
do something about this. 

Round Lake 

Nothing wrong with guns 

My dog was shot in the Ingleside area 
by a neighbor, yet Lake County offi- 
cials, Animal Control, and the Sher- 
iffs Department see nothing wrong 
with someone shooting a rifle in a 
residential area. It seems taking the 
law into your own hands is con- 
doned in Lake County. 

Round Lake Beach 

Great police force? 

Isn't it great that a Libertyville cop, 
when he was a police officer, molest- 
ed a young minor female. He gets off 
with two years probation and 21 
days in a work release program. How 
many people have been charged 
with teen, female or child molesta- 
tion and have gone to jail for a long 
period of time? This wasn't his first 
time. He misused his badge and did 
something illegal, yet he's still walk- 
ing the street. What a good police 
force we have. 

Libertyville 

I agree 

I'm calling in response to "Disgust- 
ed." I fully agree with the points they 
made. Why can't people just grow 
up, they're too busy worrying about 
themselves to see thai others need 
help. 1 don't think a lot of people 
learn mutual respect. 

Antioch 

Response 

This is in answer to last week's caller, 
who berated both UHAUA and my- 
self. The figures and the facts she 
sent to homeowners were approved 



give their town name. 

Antioch 

Need my privacy 

Real estate transactions should not 
be published in the newspaper. I and 
my neighbors have a right to some 
privacy. I don't own a credit card for 
this reason. One pre-approved mail- 
ing wanted my mother's maiden 
name. What business is it of dieirs? 
The gas company has jusi an- 
nounced they will start credit bureau 
reporting of their accounts. Do I owe 
them money? No! Do I object? Yes! 
Six months ago, my name, address, 
phone number, assessed value of my 
home and PIN number were sold on 
the Internet by a telemarketing com- 
pany. After many obnoxious calls, 
one caller had the courtesy to send 
me a copy of the printout 1 nov/have 
an unlisted number and a gadget to 
block caller ID. Privacy is a safety 
precaution just as surely as a burglar 
alarm. Those who have my address 
and phone number have needed it 
for a reason. The others havefloin- 

herent right to know. 

Ingleside 

Give some back 

Mary Davis wants a new referen- 
dum for the spring, but 1 will not 
vote for a referendum for our town 
when she gets over $1 00,000 a year 
that she doesn't earn. If she feels 
the school district needs more 
money, she should give back half 
her pay. She says she's concerned 
about overcrowding, but she does- 
n't deserve the money she makes. 
She's married to the mayor of 
Round Lake Beach, she doesn't de- 
serve it. 

Round Lake Park 

Just smashing 

I'd like to thank the kids who were 
out on Arcade Drive for smashing 
our pumpkins before 8:30 p.m. Hal- 



up trucks and discarded it. They by the Lake County Public Works loween night I hope that when you 

grow up and have kids of your own, 

that bratty kids won't come smash 
your pumpkins like you did ours, 
and ruin your Halloween. 

Lake Villa 



I'm calling about President Clinton. 
I want to say that when you do some- 
thing really bad sometimes, it's kind 
of like wearing a white silk suit ai a 
party and having ketchup spilled on 
it. The person did the spilling can say 
"I'm sorry, "and the person who's 
wearing the outfil can say "I forgive 
you," and everyone at the party can 
say "how sad," but the point is that 
the red stain is on the outfit and 
sometimes ihe only thing you can do 
is lo get rid of it There's no love, hate 
or politics involved, that's jusi the 
way it is. 

Fox Lake 

Why not more publicity? 

The weather was just great, the 



even arranged transportation for 
those who had a difficult time gel- 
ling to their homes. It all worked 
out very well, and it is a big im- 
provement to the village. Thank 
you! 

Fox Ijxke 

Bring back lady 

I'm very upset I live in Round Lake 
Beach and what they're doing at the 
Village Hall is unfair. I go in and 
ihere's a Spanish-speaking lady who 
was there to help me. Now she's not 
there anymore. 1 don't think the 
Round Lake Beach Village Hall is 
very friendly to Hispanics. 

Round Lake Beach 

Let's find out why 

According to the Wall Street Journal, 
many states contribute more to the 



Department We did not try to mis- 
lead anyone. Your figures are ridicu- 
lous. We have talked to public offi- 
cials about grant money. They said 
we wouldn't look for any grants un- 
less (hey knew what the people 
wanted. Thus, the fact sheet I espe- 
cially take offense to your remark 
about all letters being sent back to 
me. 1 have not opened one letter be- 
cause I knew there would be one 
small-minded person out therewith 
no eihics who would question mine. 
All letters are turned over to a com- 
mittee unopened. 

Antioch 

Thanks 

I'm calling to thank Addie Young at 
First Chicago Bank in Antioch for all 
the help she gave me. If it wasn't for 
her kindness, I'd still be in a mess. 



federal government than they get Thanks again', from Bernice 

back in federal funds, Connecticut Antioch 

was number one, New Jersey was 

number two, and guess what, Illinois Need more GateHeS 

was number three. How about ask- Why do we need another auto parts 



Thanks for 'haunting' 

I would like to thank Allen, the Sec- 
ond Federal Savings bank group, 
and especially Elise, for letting us 
participate in their Haunted Bank. 
I hope everyone enjoyed the 
haunting as much as we enjoyed 

haunting you. 

Spring Grove 

Get with it 

1 want to tell the village board offi- 
cials to get with it They want to build 
a little strip mall between the comers 
of Midlothian and Route 60/83. We 
don't need another Burger King in 
Mundelein. We have two already. 
Why not a White Castle or a family 
restaurant? We need other things in 
this town, get with i' 1 

• Mundelein 



November 6, 1998 












COUNTY^ 



■ ■ 



ffe 






Lakeland Newspa, 





: i- ; p 



a 



By RHONDA BURKE ,. 

Managing Editor 

- 

Gary Del Re's crime fighting 
message got through to Lake County 
voters Tuesday/as he easily won re- 
election to a new term as sheriff. 

"Our message resonated with the 
voters of Lake County," Del Re said, 
"We have shown a vision for the fu- 
ture of Lake County and the ability to 
lead the rest of county." ., 



.-■- , 







Del Re, who has served as sheriff 
since October 1996, defeated his De- 
mocratic challenger Mariene Run- 
yard In his first re-election contest 
Del Re received 86,223 votes or about 
60 percent, compared to 58,140 for 
Runyard or 40 percent. 

Del Re said he couldn't have 
been successful without the hard 
work and dedication of the officers in 
his department . 

I am very proud of the men and 



women of the sheriff s office and the 
job the do," Del Re said. They are 
professional and dedicated to the 
job." -j 

The Republican sheriff .was also 
complimentary of his Democratic 
opponent in the race. 

"She ran an issue-oriented race. 

It was never negative or personal," 

Del Re said. "The campaign was a 

tribute to both of us and a credit to 

Mariene." 

i 



i 




Above left, Sheriff Gary Del Re reacts to incoming election results Tuesday night along with well- 
wishers at his campaign headquarters In the Lake County Courthouse building in Waukegan. Above 
right, Democratic challenger Mariene Runyard watches the poll results in her election loss for Lake 
County Sheriff against the incumbent Del Re at the Lake County Building. — Photo by Sandy Bress- 
ner 




■■ •• 



»*« • 



.** 



Del Re said he enjoyed the chal- 
lenge of both me primary arid the 
general election, sayinghe felt the di- 
alogue on the issues was a benefit to 
the sheriffs department He defeated 
Willie Ray Smith in the Republican 
primary. * 

Del Re was appointed to the post 
of Lake County Sheriff by the Lake 
County Board in 1996, following the 
resignation of Clint Grinnell for the 
top cop's job due to health reasons. 
Del Re was undersheriff at the time 
and has worked in law enforcement 
for more than two decades. 

"It Is good to know the voters 
have responded to me," he said. 
This is a dream job, since I began 
as a patrol officer in Buffalo Grove 
23 years ago, this is what I have 
wanted to do. I am very pleased." 

Runyard, a 19-year veteran of 
the Waukegan Police Department 
said she felt she had ran a good 
campaign. 

"I enjoyed campaigning and 1 
think we got a lot of good mes- 
sages out there and had good dia- 
logue with the voters. I am very 
pleased with the number of voters 
that supported me," Runyard said. 
"It was a good race." 

In her campaign, Runyard 
called for the development of a 
Strategic Operation Plan and 
Comprehensive Domestic Vio- 
lence Plan to address law enforce- 
ment needs in Lake County and 
combat domestic violence. 

Runyard entered the race in 
mid-summer and did not com- 
pete in the March primary. She 
did not indicate if she has any 
plans for running for public office 
again in the future. 

She will continue her duties 
with the Waukegan Police Depart- 
ment, where she currently holds 
the rank of lieutenant. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES 



H*W*tl «» n w wrt*y IWI til M W li 



. ................ 



Sept 28-Oct 1 #*s 

, \ ^Michael McHnley Parsons arid., ■".,; 
Roxarie Clihgerman of Round Lake - 
Beach; Rafael Vilchis and Rosalva 
Gonzalez of Round Lake Beach; Ri- 
cardo Martin arid Sonia Acosta of 
Round Lake Park; Patrick Beaver and - 
Kimberly Hawtho me of Round Lake 
Beach; Ryan Cruz and Liza M on - 
donedo of Wadsworth; James Hoff- , 
manandMaiyHiUbfUbertyville. , 

Paul Hughes Jr. of, Waukegan^ 
and Renee Pierce of Guniee; Russell t 
Byrd and Nora Renteria of Grayslaker 
James Carter of Libertyvilie and Lu- 
cille Ericksbri of Gages Lake; James 
Leaf of Lake Villa and Kristen Kwasi- 
borski of Libertyvilie; M. Sean 
Mitchell and Regina Redman of In- 
gleside. 

Oct S-Oct.9 

Richard Clausen and. Nadlne 
Roberts of Gumee; Dwayne Hogan 
and Sandra Prietd of Round Lake 
Beach; Steven Lary and Kelly Champ- 
ney of Fox Lake; Juan Roberto of 
Grayslake and Elsa Rodriguez of Ver- 1 
non Hills; Derek Faurbo and Lisa 
Geiyer of Wild wood; Jason Lindas of 
Lake Villa and Jay-Jay MarreroTIlib of 
Racine, Wis. 

Juan Sanchez and Monica 
Echeverria of Mundelein; Daniel 
Dawson and Christine Visser of In- 
gleside; Michael Starzecand Evelyn 
Hipona of Grayslake; Richard 
Fredricksen and Donna Hafferkamp 
of Antioch; Rogelio Garcia of 
Mundelein and Cathy Jacobo of 
Round Lake Park; Mark Heliios and 
Amanda Morrison of higleside; Jose 
Hurtado of Gumee and Deifilia Lopez 
of Waukegan; Chad Morin and 
Ernestine Cibor of Wildwood; 
Lawrence Simon and Beverly Simon 
of Gumee, Bradley Feldman and San- 
dra Robertson of Gumee; Michael 
Watson IV of Atlanta, Ga. and Samid- 
ha J ungh are of Libertyvilie. 






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C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



November 6, 1998 



Divorce, separation, and taxes 



Divorced and separated taxpay- 
ers encounter unique tax problems 
and situations. They are faced with 
questions like — who gets to claim the 
children as exemptions, which filing 
status should I use, is this money 
considered alimony, and how do we 
handle property settlements? 

The most common question the 
Internal Revenue Service is asked by 
divorced or separated parents is, 
"Who can claim the children as de- 
pendent?" The general rule is thai 
the custodial parent is treated as hav- 
ing provided over half of the child's 
total support. This means the custo- 
dial parent can claim the child as a 
dependent, if the other dependency 
tests are also met. 

However, custodial parents 
can agree not lo claim the child as 
an exemption by filing Form 8332. 
"Release of Claim to Exemption for 
Child of Divorced or Separated 
Parents." The noncustodial parent 
attaches the signed form to his or 
her return, and can claim the child 
as a dependent. Additional infor- 
mation on this issue Is available in 
publication 504, "Divorced or Sep- 
arated Individuals." 

And don't forgot, you must in 
chide tin your tax return the taxpay- 



er identification number (generally 
the social security number — SSN) of 
every person for whom you claim an 
exemption. Jf you need a SSN. con- 
tact your local Social Security office 
and ask for Form SS-5, "Application 
for a Social Security Number Card." 
If you do not list the dependent's 
SSN when required or if you list an 
incorrect SSN, the exemption may be 
disallowed. 

The answer to the filing status 
question will partly depend on 
your marital status on the last day 
of the lax year. If you are unmar- 
ried, your filing status is single, or 
if you meet certain requirements, 
head of household. Generally, you 
are considered unmarried for the 
whole year if you obtained a final 
decree of divorce or separate 
maintenance by the last day of the 
tax year, or if you obtained a de- 
cree of annulment. 

If you arc separated but have 
not obtained a final decree of di- 
vorce or separate maintenance by 
the last day of the tax year, you are 
considered married for the whole 
year. An interlocutory decree is not 
a final decree. 

Divorced individuals sometimes 
pay or receive alimony. Alimony is a 



payment to a spouse or former 
spouse under a divorce orseparation 
agreement. It does not include pay- 
ments that are voluntary. 

Alimony can be deducted by the 
payer and must be included in in- 
come by the recipient. Only cash 
payments now quality as alimony. 
Child support payments and non- 
cash property settlements are never 
considered alimony, and are not tax- 
able or deductible. 

In the case of property settle- 
ments, a taxable gain or loss on the 
transfer of property between spous- 
es or former spouses is not recog- 
nized if the transfer is made be- 
cause of a divorce. You may, how- 
ever, have to report the transaction 
on a gift tax return. If the property 
you owned jointly is sold in order to 
split the proceeds as part of your 
property settlement, you must each 
report your share of the gain or loss 
on the sale. 

1 know this is a complicated 
subject. If you would like more in- 
formation, consult Publication 
504, or have it mailed free of 
charge by calling the IRS at 1-800- 
829-3676.— By Robert E. Brazzil, 
Illinois District Director, Internal 
Revenue Service. 



How tang is a long pie? 



\ 

Time can be our best friend. It can 
make good things better and unpleas- 
ant things fade away. Historically, time 
has also rewarded investors. 

A concern of many investors, 
though, is how much time is enough. 
As people get older, they're even a little 
reluctant to buy green bananas. After 
all, we don't want to miss out on en- 
joying the fruits of our efforts. So, how 
long is long term? 

Gamblers say the longer you stay 
in the game, the higher your chances 
of losing. That's because the odds are 
in favor of the house. But investing in 
the stock market is the opposite The 
longer you stay in, the better your 
chances of winning, because the odds 
are on your side. 

To understand how time has 
historically increased your odds of 
winning, it can be helpful to look at 
mutual fund performance in time 
blocks. Consider the 63-year history 
of one of the largest, most popular 
mutual funds, divided into 10-year 
periods. The first 10 -year period be- 
gan in 1934 and ended in 1943. The 
second began in 1935, ending In 
1944, and so on. This fund has had 
54 10-year periods. It's also had 59 
five-year periods, 62 two-year peri- 
ods and, of course, 63 one-year peri- 
ods. 



-rt 



Looking, at one-year periods, if 
you had bought the fiind every Jan. 1 
and sold It every Dec; 31, you would 
have achieved a gain 67 percent of 
the time. If you had held the fund for 
any two-year period, your odds of 
winning were 82 percent Five-year 
holders had a 95 percent chance of 
winning, and those long-term In- 
vestors who held the fund for any 10- 
year period won. 100 percent of the 
time. Every* 10-year period in this 
fund's history has rewarded Investors 
with a positive return. ^ ; . , 

There are no guarantees in In-- 
vesting. Every, thne you make ah In- 
vestment, you take some "degree of 
risk- But if you decide to bury your 
money rather than invest It, you risk 
losing it to Inflation. Which risk 
would you rather take? 

The good news is that time Is your 
friend With high-quality Investments, 
the longer you Invest, the more you 
spread your risk. Each year you give a 
good investment to grow, history 
shows the odds of winning get bet- 
ter.— By Noah Seidenberg 



Noah Seidenberg is affiliated with 
Edward Jones Investments in 
Grayslake. For more information, call 
223-1908 



v. ■■ 

.v" 



i 



.."■ 



/ 



YOUR NEEDS ARE CHANGING. FIRST OF AMERICA IS CHANGING, TOO. 




First of America is now National City. 

More resources to help you. More ATMs to seme you. More people 
to advise you. These are just a few of the benefits you'll gain when 
First of America becomes National City. You know where you're going 



in life. Now, through National City, you have a partner who can 
connect you with the right investment opportunities, financial services 
and advice. Take charge of your 
financial future. Follow your own lead. 



National CHy 

FOLLOW YOUR OWN LEAD' 



www.iMlKinjJ-alytfini . MtmbiT FDIC . <D\tK. ^JJli<l^^^lCit)'Cnrptlratilm• 







"•>',*, ...,,,. 



MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

DimTayloT 






■ 




iV-V'i 








get excited;.. 







harlle asked me to sign a 

'confidentiaUtyfonri. It 
, was a written promise not 
to steal his Idea or tell any- 
one else about it I signed, then 
Charlie told me about the details. 

As he described his idea, I re- 
membered seeing or reading some- 
thing about a very similar product 
We found It in a four-month-old 
National automotive magazine. 
Ch ar lie's i dea was already patented 
and on the market , 

Sally's new idea was clever and 
cute. Sally thought so, her mother 
thought so and all her friends 
agreed. Sally knew this was her 
ticket to early retirement 

Sally grew defensive as I began 
to ask questions. Who might buy 
her product? How much will it cost 
to build and package the product? 
How much mi gilt a buyer be willing 
to pay for it? 

Sally didn't want to deal with 
these or any other questions. She 
wanted to get a loan and begin 
manufacturing right away. 

Charlie and Sally are real. I've 
changed their names and the situa- 
tions for the sake of confidentiality. 

I've seen hundreds of new 
product ideas over the years. Some 
are on the market today doing nice- 
ly, while others never made the 
grade. If you have an idea for a new 
product and aren't sure how to pro- 
ceed, read on^, ^ , . 

Successful Product 
Characteristics 

The best products are desirable. 
It should be fascinating and com- 
pelling. It may fill a need, but you'll 
sell more if it satisfies a "want" as 
well. 

The products with the highest 
potential are simple, but obvious. 
The benefits your products offer 
should be self-evident If you have 
to spend a lot of time explaining 
how It works and why everyone 
should have one, it may not sell. 

The best products have a posi- 
tive image. If your product is harm- 
ful or degrading to individuals or 
the environment, don't expect in- 
stant success. 

.Your new product needs a high- 
ly definable target customer. If you 
feel everybody will want one, you 
probably won't appeal to anyone 

Your product needs to be inno- 
vative. If you are trying to solve a 
common problem, you must solve 
It better than anyone else has. Is 
your approach fresh and Innova- 
tive? 

Your product shouldn't be too 
far ahead of the accepted curve. In- 
novative yes, far-out no. Beware of 
faddish, futuristic trends. 

The best products are "stand 
alone" products. Don't tie your 
success to another's wagon. 

Your new product should uti- 
lize established channels of distrib- 
ution. Getting a new product ready 
for the market is enough of a chal- 
lenge. You don't want to blaze a 
new path to the market as well. 

The best products are targeted 
at specific price points. One of the 
most clever new products I ever saw 
violated this principle and never 
sold. Market research indicated a 
price point of about two dollars. 
The client was so sold on his own 
idea that he got a little greedy and 
tried to bring it to the market at four 
dollars. No sale. With careful cost 
control it could have netted its 



Please see TAYLOR / CI 



■:■■:.- 



ill 




.; -• . • . . ■ j. '. 

November 6, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers/ $ j& • 




Short-term interest rates cut, mortgage 



interest rates 



The Federal Reserve Board's 
move to cut short-term interest rates 
caught the attention of many con- 
sumers, and for good reason— lower 
interest rates mean consumers pay 
less for the money they borrow. Ac- 
cording to the Mortgage Bankers As- 
sociation, for every . 1 -percentage 
point drop in interest rates, more than 
four million new borrowers are able 
to purchase a $100,000 home. 

"The Federal Reserve Board's de- 
cision to cut rates doesn't have a di- 
rect impact on mortgage rates, but 
the same indicators that caused the 
Fed to cut rates, have driven mortgage 
rates to 30-year lows,* said Rob 
Speight, branch manager for the 
Grayslake area Norwest Mortgage, 
Inc., the nation's leading provider of 
home loans. "However, the rate cut 
should benefit borrowers with Ad- 
justable Rate Mortgages ( ARMs), who 
may notice a slight decrease in their 
mortgage interest rate." 

Speight said the average interest 
rate for a 30-year loan was 6.60 per- 
cent for the week ended Oct 2, down 
from 6.64 percent the week before, 
and 7.43 percent from one year ago. 
While this is not a dramatic decline 
from steady lows throughout 1998, as 
recently as January 1995, mortgage 
rates reached 9.15 percent. 

"Comparing today's rates from 
just a few years ago, this is a great op- 
portunity for homeowners consider- 
ing refinancing, or homebuyers con- 
sidering purchasing or 'moving-up' 
into a larger home," said Speight 

Low Interest rates translate into 
lower monthly mortgage payments 
for many, which is often the biggest 
influencer of a homebuyer's decision 
to purchase a home, according to 
Speight Depending on the loan type, 
conditions and term, a single per- 
centage point can literally save a bor- 
rower hundreds ' of dollars each 
month and thousands of dollars over 
the life of the loan. 

For example, a borrower wanting 
to finance $100,000 with a 30-year 
fixed rate mortgage at eight percent 
would pay about $735 per month in 
principal and interest The same bor- 
rower would pay approximately $632 
per month in principal and interest 



ows 



at least two percentage points below 
their, current mortgage rate before 
they refinanced. Today, Improved 

products and services make refinanc- 



duced or avoided. Several lending in- 
stitutions, including Norwest Mort- 
gage, oQer no-cost loans, which allow 
borrowers to roll in their closing costs 



with a 30-year fixed rate loan at to- 
day's 6.5 percent, a savings of $103 
per month and $ 1 ,236 a year in prin- 
cipal and interest 

Many "move-up" buyers are 
taking advantage of low rates to buy 
more home for the same monthly 
payment, Speight said. For a 
monthly payment of around $800, 
homeowners with a $100,000, 30- 
year fixed rate loan at nine percent 
can move into a home worth 
$125,000 and maintain their 
monthly payment 

Current homeowners can also 
take advantage of the low interest rate 
environment to refinance. Until re- 
cently, however, many homeowners 
believed interest rates needed to drop 



ing much more economical than in. for a small application fee and a 



the past 

"Refinancing Is now a question of 
howlong it takes ahomeowner to re- 
coup refinancing costs or save on 
monthly payments," . Speight said. 
"Depending on the loan type and re- 
financing package, some borrowers 
can realize savings within several 
months to a few years, even if rates 
drop just one full percentage point, 
sometimes less." 

Forexample, a borrower can refi- 
nance a $150,000, 30-year fixed rate 
mortgage from eight percent to 6.75 
percent roll the closing costs into the 
rate— reducing any out-of-pocket ex- 
penses—and save more than $ 1 ,530 a 
year in principal and interest 

Refinancing costs can also be re- 



slightly higher interest rate. 

However, while refinancing is of- 
ten a popular option during low In- 
terest rate environments, homeown- 
ers should also consider their long- 
term housing heeds. "Refinancing 
makes good financial sense, but at the 
same time, customers should trunk 
long-term," Speight said, "under- 
stand that rates haven't been this low 
for generations and we have no rea- 
son to believe they, will stay at these 
levels. So, why not take advantage 
now and lock-in a rate for your larger 
home. You'll feel good about paying 
6.5 percent in 15 years, when your 
new neighbors move in and pay nine 
percent or whatever the rate may be 
at that time." 




Lake Forest Place is officially open 

Lake Forest Place, northern Illinois* newest continuing care facility, officially opened Oct. 3. Par- 
ticipating in the opening ceremonies, from left, are Peter Mulvey, president/CEO of Presbyterian 
Homes, the owner of Lake Forest Place; Allen C. Menke, former chairman of the board; R. Douglas 
Petrie, chairman of the board of Presbyterian Homes; Dr. M. Allen Kimble, chairman emeritus; and 
Wiley N. Caldwell, chairman of the Lake Forest Committee. Lake Forest Place is the venture of the 
not-for-profit Presbyterian Homes, a well-respected provider of innovative health care and resi- 
dential options for seniors.— Submitted photo 



Top 10 mistakes people make when getting a home equity loan 



1. Not checking to see if your 
loan has a pre- paymen t penalty 
clause. 

If you are getting a "NO FEE" 
home-equity loan, chances are that 
it has a hefty pre-payment penalty 
clause. This can be very important if 
you are planning to sell your house 
or refinance in the next 3-5 years. 

2. Getting too large a credit 
line. 

When you get too large a credit 
line, you can get turned down for 
other loans, because some lenders 
calculate your payments based on 
the available credit and not just the 
used credit! Having a large equity 
line indicates a large potential pay- 
ment, which makes it difficult to 
qualify for loans. Note: this argument 
holds even if your equity line has a 
zero balance. 

3. Not understanding the dif- 
ference between an equity loon 
and an equity line. . 

An equity loan is closed— Le. you 
get all your money up front and then 
make fixed payments on that loan, 
until you pay it off. An equity line is 
open— i.e. you can get an initial ad- 
vance against the line and then reuse 



the line as often as your want during 
the period that the line is open. Most 
equity lines are accessed through a 
checkbook or a credit card. On equi- 
ty lines, you only pay interest on the 
outstanding balance. 

Use an equity loan when you 
need all the money up front— e.g. 
home improvement, debt consolida- 
tion. 

Use an equity line if you have an 
ongoing need for money or need the 
money for a future event — e.g. you 
need to pay for your child's college 
tuition In three years. 

4. Not checking the lifecap 
on your equity line. 

Many credit lines have lifecaps of 
18%. Be prepared to pay payments at 
higher interest levels if rates move 
upwards. 

5. Getting a home-equity 
loan from your local bank with - 
out shopping around. 

Many consumers get their eq- 
uity line from the bank that they 
have a checking account with. 
Use your bank, but shop around 
first. 

8. Not getting a good-faith es- 
timate of closing costs. 



Your mortgage company is re- 
quired to provide you with a written 
good-faith estimate of closing costs 
within 3 working days of receiving 
the application. 

7. Assuming that your home 
equity loan is tax deductible. 

In some instances, your home- 
equity loan is NOT tax deductible. 
This may be the case if you make 
too much and fail into the AMT 
trap, or if you have pulled out more 
than $100,000 cash from your 
home. Do not depend on your 
mortgage company regarding this 
matter — check with an accountant 
or CPA. 

8. Assuming that u home-eq- 
uity Is always cheaper than a car 
loan or a credit card. 

A credit card at 6.9% is cheap- 
er than a credit line at 12%, even 
after the tax deduction. To com- 
pare rates, compute the effective 
rate of your home-equity loan, 
with the rate on a credit card or 
auto loan. Effective rate = rate * (1 
• tax-bracket) 

Example : If the rate of the 
home-equity loan is 12% and your 
tax bracket is 30%, your effective rate 



is : 12% * (1-0.3) = 12%'0.7 = 8.4% 
If your credit card is higher than 
8.4%, then the equity loan is cheap- 
er, otherwise it is noL 

Besides the interest rate, you 
may also want to compare monthly 
payments and other terms of the 
loan. 

9. Getting a home-equity line 
of credit If you plan to refinance 
your Drst mortgage In the near 
future. 

Many mortgage companies look 
at the combined loan amounts (i.e. 
the first loan plus the second) even 
when they are refinancing the first 
mortgage. If you plan on refinancing 
your first, check with your mortgage 
company if getting a second will 
cause your refinance to get turned 
down. 

10. Getting a home-equity 
line to pay oil your credit cards 
If your spending Is out of con* 
troll 

When you pay off your credit 
cards with your equity line, don't put 
your house on the line by going out 
and charging up those credit cards 
again! If you can't manage the plas- 
tic, tear it up! 



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C10 /Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



M^^^jm 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 



Cue, $360,317 

Gumee 



■*• "** ■* ..»..*.,.*... 



Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



Antioch 



531 Longview, Timothy & Sandra Bor- 

ries, $144,800 

875 Mockingbird Dr, Jeffrey & Linnea 

Pine, $202,810 

855 Mockingbird Ln. Fred Ploisky, 

$243,010 

1377 Redwing Dr, Benjamin & Laura 

Bell, $236,1 10 

74 1 Summerlyn Dr, Christopher & 

Elenita Winkowski, $ 147,0 1 5 

1 072 White Pine Dr, Joseph Biondo, 

$204,500 



Fox Lake 



741 1 Crest Hill Ct, Robert Zimmerman 

& Sally Russell, $62,000 

44 Forest Ave, Thomas Russ, 594,500 

24-7 Jamaica Colony, John Spahr, 

$3B,500 

199 Janet Ct, Clancy & Karen Scott, 

$185,000 

7227 Oxford Cir. Colleen Monahan, 

$110,000 



Grayslake 



401 Arlinglon l.n, James Slimier, 

$176,250 

127H Uerksliire I.n, Jason Keinh.iqlii & 

Melissa Neimvakl. SL^.H-'U 

1311 Herkshire l,n, Viisani & Sarah 

Surali,$JI7,230 

[319 Berkshire l.n. I -"rank Carlesimo I 

JuiiiCiiili'simo. 5226.000 



17563 Hunitington Cir, Janusz Kowals- 
ki & Barbara Kowlaski, $172,000 
17473 Huntington Cir, Ronald Moeller 
& Karen Moerller, $198,000 
402 Jennifer Ln, Bruce Kirkpatrick, 
$295,000 

95 Keeneland Ct, Craig Mivshek, 
$128,411 

231 Lenox Ct. Michael Hendershot, 
$176,400 

9 1 8 Manchester Cir, Lisa Johnson & 
Daniel White, $143,000 
879 N. Alleghany, Bruce Stanhoipe & 
Toni Stqanhope, $245,000 
34488 N. Tangueray Dr, John & Ida 
Pavlos,$207,]65 

1565 Portia Rd, Paul & Donna Grave- 
line, $397,000 

144 School Si, City & Carol Wadas. 
$135,000 

200 Seafarer Dr, Daniel ft Gwendolyn 
Smith, $185,000 

520 Switcligrass l.n, Stephan & Mirka 
Tatschel, $305,605 
IH6I6 W. Meander Dr. John Crofl. 
$260,000 

535 \V. Trail, Christine & Mark Jlosfnrd. 
$252,000 

1.1'U) Woodside Ci. V'irireni jb Karen 
Amlrrosia, $233,100 

Green Oaks 

3I3HON", Heinle I. n.AkliiarAli. 

$44 5,098 

14 1 15 W. iiraemore Close, Trandafir 







> -■-■' 



DEDICATED & 
EXPERIENCED! 

"your premier home realtor" 



I 



289 Arlington-English Meadows $168,900 

(i'rc.il init'iuii J< >i ' 

S/i.i/p &• ririHr.il ViUillcd 

cr.iiirn;s in li\ my nn,ni, 

in.isit-i lu-(|n » >in K kiW Inn. 

VV'Inii- o.ik (,ilniii-!s Nk-wiT 

IH-tilral i .ii |nt Ihsidr 

painu-d l yr. ago. 

W,i I k li > c Jo im 1 1 1 1 a ry 

school. Hasy Meira. 




t 



919 Bo nnie Brook-Dou ble lot $107,300! 

New carpet and paint in 

this 3 bedroom I . I bath 

tri-lcvel with family room. 

Double wooded lot plus 

2.5 car garage! 
Hurry!! Call Christopher 

((vdai/! 



I 




jpj* ...*.._ v««»* * 



562 Fairfax Lane-Grayslake $239,800 

Picture perfect 4+ bonus 

room contemporary 2 story 

on well landscaped and 

/ '^" 'jg^^Sf'^Sj^-J'' 4 fenced lot. 1st Floor 

office/den/bedroom plus 

sun room! Family room 

fireplace, center island 

kitchen and double patio! 

It's a beauty! -come see! 




Christopher Hoelz, crp, crs, gri 



liowease 



• 




5466 Barnwood Rd, Tommie & Viola 

Turner, $243,000 

7485 Bittersweet, Michael & Martha 

Hinz, $345,000 

34418 Bridge Ln, Jeffrey Schultz, 

$129,000 .. d , . ., , 

7234 Buchanan Dr, Brian & Jackie Mai- 

one, $222,877 

1466 Camden, Thomas Mulhcrn, 

$195,000 

5559 Chapel Hill, Kris & Karen 

Thorstenson, $260,240 

5590 Chapel Hill, Mark & Lynn Green- 

baum, $280,775 

36392 Edgewood, Cahtenne Ingram, 

$140,000 „ _„ 

36777 Grandwood Dr. Thomas & WW 

Sheridan. $140,000 

1 144 Hadlcy Cir, Barry & Christy Brave, 

$269,277 

346 Hillview Dr, nilioii & Lorna In- 
gram, $345,000 

4 ] 7 Hillview Dr, Thomas & Andrea 
Williamson, $289,224 
274 Knoxbury Ct, DeanneStahl, 
$115,000 

7203 Pennsbury Iji, Heryk & Irena Sty- 
nulkowski.S21B.OIO 
778 Pine Grove, Harry Hlakc, $193,900 
7063 S. Slratlon, f : elicia Russell, 
$125,000 

1349 Sunrise. Paul & Kathleen Solan, 
SI 09,000 

930 Taylor #210. Dale & Velma Cordon. 
$100,000 

17409 W. Chestnul Ln. Melanie Dacu- 
mos, $97,500 

17871 W. Pond Hidgew Cir, Kh 
Henee Jewell. $34 4.000 
6717 W. Wellsley, Itavan I Gahrielle 
Deanparvar, $130,000 
1«705 Weslwood I'l. Thomas Slrenger, 
$124,500 



Ha^esvllle 



174 V.. Bighorn Dr, Huhen CJuembin, 

$147,283 

276 Sanciuan" Cl, Mark Voder, 

$209,384 

Hawthorn Woods 

3 Ben! Tree Ct, Stephen A Dagmar 

Dugan, $280,000 

12 Cmvden ltd, John & Jackie Itowlette, 

$352,0(10 

KiThornriekl l.n, Steven Pedliak& Jen- 
nifer C.rav. $315.0011 



Ingleside 



36171 E End Ave, Derrick Baylor & 

Nicole Cashmore, $95,000 

35992 N. Fairfield, Scott & Margaret 

Palmer, $161,000 

35831 N. Helendale Rd, John Jubach, 

$87,000 

34910 N. James Ave, Joanne Woods, 

$94,000 



Lake Villa 



610 CarlyleCt, Teresa Hoff, $241,321 

1481 Carriage Ln, Karla Northam & 

Thomas Holevas, $140,000 

38810 Cedar Valley, Jeffrey & Leslie 

Molitar, $229,000 

24949 Elm, Steven & Andrea Herron, 

$116,000 

37146 Fairview Ln, Michael Gray, 

$111,500 

25282 Lehman, John Mikusa, $105,000 

36872 N, Deerview Dr. Ricardo Del 

Real, $280,000 

37231 N. Lake Shore Dr, Jeanne Stoehr, 

$105,000 

725 Northwind Ln, Daniel & Teresa 

Murphy, $239,000 



3 SheehanDr, Thomas Mcallfcter, 
£°W, Lazy Acre Rd, Phillip Doktor, 

UwSead, Erich & Juliet Richey, 

$192,000 

UbertyviMe 



350-6b Brainerd Ave. Zubeda Osmani, 
$85,000 , ^ ,,„ .. 

1656 Cass Ave. David & Cheryl Wacnik, 

$321 750 

5521 Churchill Ln, David & Martha 
Gibbons, $645,000 
1 509 Eric Ln. Hao Bai & Helen Zhou, 
$373,799 

1331 Forever Ave, Gary & Ann John- 
ston. $342,000 

516 Garfield, John & Nancy Wedell, 
$191,000 

2 1 6 Homewood Dr, Michael Godfrey & 
Lisa Davis, $295,000 
1300 Kristin Dr, Jerome & Carol 
Graczyk, $370,000 

610 Nordic Ct, George & Michelle Ry- 
der, $320,000 

504 North Ave, Ralph Doke, $460,000 
520 Roosevelt Dr, William & Cynthia 
Ruby, $289,000 

11 14 Sussex, Greg Miegham& Wendy 
Siegel, $222,500 

20000 Tremont Ct, John & Janet Mc- 
donald, $820,000 
612 W. Golf Rd, David Relmer, $223,500 

Llndenhnrst 

488 Heather Ct, Michael & Vtcki Griffin, 

$163,628 

90 N. Crooked Lake Ln, John & Carman 

Terselic, $192,750 

2402 Sunset, Richard Frantell, $108,000 

366 Teal Rd, Dennis & Donna Sullivan, 

$159,000 

Mundeleln 

1 228 AJlanson Rd. Donald Morris, 

$128,000 

1202-a Ballantrae, Unda Wilson, 

$104,500 

89 Bedford Rd, Xu-feng Zhang & Li-jie 

Luo, $135,000 

823 E. Orchard Rd, Gordon Frano, 

$85,000 

933 N. Ridgeland Ave, Illinois Dept Of 

Transportation, $2,000 

1385 Newport, Steve & Debra Hwang, 

$159,800 

810 Noel Dr, David & Clare Machtig, 

$143^000 

19206 Tahoe Dr W, Paul & Unda Alli- 

bone, $290,000 

26 151 Walnut, Augustin & Julia Servin, 

$155,000 



Park City 



339 Devonshire, Andrea Medina, 
$125,000 



Round Lake 



2146 Green Valley Ln, Matthias & Mary 

Jane Lindemann, $160,000 

34847 N. East End, Lenon Ambercrom- 

bie, $74,000 

24577 Passavant, Gloria Favela & Andi- 

do Ortiz, $66,500 

Round Lake Beach 

1505 Cherokee Dr, Jesus & Francisca 

Cordero, $105,800 

355 E. Springwood Ct, John Vaughn, 

$143,675 

377 E. Stanton Ct, Michael & Elizabeth 

Garchie, $143,535 

393 E. Stanton Ct, Anthony Coronado, 

$150,861 

1515 Elm, Jeffrey Beginski, $103,350 

300 Fruitwood, Tommie Carter, 

$136,500 



WeIcome WAqoN 

Has useful gifts and helpful information for 
you. ...ALL FREE!! 



Just Engaged? 



Fox Lake 


Gumee 


Spring Grove 


Lori 


Jan 


548-8740 


815-678-2162 


Lake Villa 


Grayslake 
WUdwood 


Lindenhurst 

Jackie 


Linda 


265-7636 


223-1607 
Gumee 

Marylyn 
336-3258 


Libertyville 

Linda 
573-0522 



New Parent? • Moved? 

Mundelein 

Lynn 
680-7346 

Round Lake 

Shelley 
543-0366 

Vernon Hills 

Doris 
680-7276 



You are entitled to a complimentary subscription from your hometown newspaper. To 
receive your paper, contact your Welcome Wagon representative or call Lakeland 
t\ Newspapers at (847) 223-8 l6l. 



TT 



1624 Halnesville Ri Kenneth fit chervi^ 
Janka,$94 ( 000:, v *' -fvf. 

1114 HUJwoodtir.'Jos'e.Oviedb, '■■ V- • - 
mm v ^- .:L^^ 
1422 Kenmore, Adolfo Gutierrez."' " ^ 
$84,000 -*!".;. 

1532 N. Lake Shore Dr, Jose Ramirez! ' 
$87,500 . . : -^ J.# ™^ 

2426 N. Salem Ln; Douglas Zemanfi y 
JennlferKoeppen^ies^ •-:- ■-. , 
2246N. Stonehenge Ct, Micheal&Lau. 
retta Kehoe, $160,677 - ' '. ^ 

MBpakwooaDr, Secre'tatybfHow. 
ing And Urban Development, $105^07 ; 
1531 Walnut Ln, William Gib on 
$90,000 V- ■■"«' :y ■'..;; .■■■■; ..- ' 

Ronnd Lake Park 



i 



545 HillcrestTer.. Melissa Beyer& 
David Ellzondo, $118,000 

126W. Willow Dr'.Robert&Laura 
Wickers, $150,000 

Round Lake Park 

1422 E.Lakeshore Dr, Barry Jennies & 
Courtney Jennings, $119,500 

Third Lake 



10 Galleon Ct, Thomas Forman, 

$179,000 

217 Malnsail t Patrick Cox, $227,500 

Wadsworth 



14491 W, Juniper Ct, Kenneth & Debra 

whiting, $4io;ooo 
Wauconda 



225-cCrestview,Waclaw 

Szatan, $85,900 

240 CrestviewDr, James Wolfe, $98,000 

447 Hill St, Peter Schmitz, $212,000 

27968 N. Ford, Chad Sisson & Elizabeth 

Karnatz, $93,000 

26897 N. Greenview Dr, Carl Hey & 

Laura BoIdrey,$ 164 ,000 

28132 N. Hickory Ln, Lynda Wallis. 

$113,900 

26123 N. Hill Ave, Eddie James & Kim 

Lewis, $245,500 

28046 N. Wells, Timothy & Unda Cor- 

belt, $177,000 

109 Parkview Dr, Mark Onysic, 

$135,000 

12 1 Vista View Dr, Kenneth Grimes & 

Lynne Kaskela, $146,000 

25577 W. Lakeview, lona Wiganl, 

$146,000 

28769 Washlntgon, Wayne St Frances 

Zachary,$186.G00 . , 

Information provided by Record In- 
formation Services, Inc. inSL Charles. Vie 
company provides public record data for 
Lake, DuPaee, Cook, Kane, McHenry, 
Kendall and Will counties including new 
incorporations, business licenses, bank- 
ruptcies, foreclosures, judgments, me- 
chanic liens, state and federal tax hens, 
residential and commercial real estate 
transfers, building permits, DUI arrests, 
divorce reports, sheriff sale foreclosures, 
(630)365-6490, publk-recontcom. 



FROM PAGE C9 



TAYLOR: 

Before getting 
excited about 
an idea... 

owner nearly 40 percent and still 
sold for $1.99. 

The best products use easily 
available materials and manufac- 
turing processes. It helps if tooling 
and start-up costs are low. The 
higher the entry level costs, the 
higher the risk factor. 

Your product needs to be safe 
to use. Product liability is a critical 
issue for businesses. More often 
than not, manufacturers will be 
drawn into court even if a product 
is misused. Keep it simple and keep 
it safe. 

Your product needs to be origi- 
nal. Check industry publications, 
patent depository libraries and all 
available literature. Don't waste 
your time and money reinventing 
the wheel. _ 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
"Up Against the Wal-Marts." You 
may write to him in care of "Minding 
Your Own Business, "P.O. Box 67, 
Amarilb, TX 79105. 



of? 



j.T-'.^^.^-y.^.^aa. 



:■■■■ :.-.- ■ : ■' ■ ■• •• .■- .:■■ 
.. - . . ; . . • . 

November 6, 1998. 



-.;,. , ■■■ . \ ■...■:■.-,. . -■■• i- .-= •....-■.-. . 

. . ■". :' .'.'■■ :'''".■ - ; -. . - ■ .. ■■:■ S 



':■"•"■' ■■■ ■ ■ ■■'■'"■■ . ■.'■■:, ■*■■-■. 



yr^s& 



. ■' , ' ■■■ '•■. -: '-':■ •■'■■ ■ .•*■..'■■.-''. 

~-i?X''K ■: ' JiXf^ '•'■''■,*-'- "■'-'• •» i l^T-t' - 'Hi*;V i es < 7fff^ J (r7 : -." if, -T 11 '''"-' ''.';■- •' 



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I'lWr-"'^^-' 



;• ...... ..;;,--:•■■. •v.l^Kls^S' 

; : ■" ■ p '.'.'■.' 

Lakeland Newspapers! 'CI 1 



IN THE NEWS 



...... ...,!.., ,,,..,. ■!«*•*, «,.„ 



w.. ¥ 



■ k*«*>i*.a*i**i>>***«it*ia»*M*taj*Mt»»**"»M »■»***"»*«*» 



Agents pass" 
$2 million marie 

Elizabeth Bryant, lady 
Stork, Linda Dlahoy, and Pat 

Webb surpassed the $2 milliorirhark 
in 1998 sales production In April, re- 
ported MJ. Seller, co-owner of Cen- 
tury 21 Kreuser and Seller In Liber- 
tyville/ '--'S : -.. ,-. .;;'v r '; 

Bryant, Stark, Dlabay and Webb 
are perennial top producers who 



live on Pine Tree Lane In Libertyville. 
Other unit sales leaders In April . 
included Ed Siege], lady Stark, 
Nancy Kreuser, Brenda Bersanl. 
arid Pam Hlderiotls. 



.'•■■■■ 



Top listers 
at Century 21 

Grayslake resident Brenda 
Bersanl and Mundelein resident 
Debbie Paoll tied for top honors in 



specialize in selling and listing listings taken in April with four each 
throughout all of Lake County. reported Tom Kreuser, co-owner of . 

the Libertyville based Century 21 
Kreuser and Seller. 

Active in the real estate business 
since 1990, Bersanl was the Lake 
County Association of Realtors 
(LCAR) Realtor Associate of the Year 
for 1997. She is a member of the 
LCAR Fair Housing Committee and 
is serving as the 1998 Vice Chair of 
the LCAR Brokerage Committee. 
Brenda and her husband, Joe, and 
family live in Grayslake. 

A longtime Lake County resi- 
dent, Paoli specializes In selling and 
listing homes throughout all of Lake 
County. Prior to joining Century 21 
Kreuser and Seller, Debbie operated 



Herman is April 
sales leader 

Libertyville resident Doreen 
Herman posted eight sales valued 
In excess of $1.6 million to lead the 
Libertyville office of Century 21 
Kreuser and Seller in sales volume 
and unit sales in April, reported M.J. 
Seller, co-owner. Herman also leads 
the office in 1998 year-to-date sales 
volume with over $3.6 million. 

Herman is a graduate of 
Wheaton College and is active in 
many local organizations, Doreen 
and her husband, Greg, and family 



her ownbusihess for }■ 
six years. Debbie and % 
her husband, Steve, 
and family, live in 
Mundelein. 

$3 million 
mark passed 
atC-21 

Doreen Her- 
man, Ed Siege!, 
Pam Hlderiotls, 
Nancy Kreuser and 
Brenda Bersanl sur- 
passed the $3 million 
mark in 1998 sales 
production in April at 
the Libertyville office 
of Century 21' Kreuser 
and Seller, reported 
Tom Kreuser, co-own- 
er of the firm. 

All are longtime 
Lake County residents 
experienced at helping 
people buy and sell new and existing 
homes throughout the county. 

Bersanl leads for 
unit sales in March 

Grayslake resident Brenda 
Bersanl posted 6.5 unit sales in the 
month of March to lead the Liber- 
tyville office of Century 21 Kreuser 




Herman 



Bersanl 



Slegel 



Hlderiotls 




how can I get the 




No problem. 

Grab a latte with a 

Harris banker and see 

how 



Prime Home Equity 
Line of Credit Rates* 



$25,000 

to 

$99,999 

$100,000 
to 



} 



prime 



}l/4 



pt. 



$249,999 J below P rime 



At Harris Bank, you'll pay prime rate* or less 
without having to borrow large sums of money. 
These aren't teaser rates, either. They're good for 
the life of your loan. 

There are no application fees or closing costs. 

You get your money quickly, and the interest 
may be tax deductible. 

You can apply by phone, or stop by one of our 
140 locations. 

Getting a home equity loan just doesn't get 
any easier. 



Harris Bank Gurnee 

4946 Grand Avenue * 6547 Grand Avenue 

Gurnee I L 60031 

(847) 362-3500 

(Brunches of Harris Bank Libertyville) 



fc^S HARRIS 
H BANK 



m 



LIBERTYVILLE. 



Helping You Make Better Choices. 




mm MxjtiiG 
LENDER 



'Fin Ihf 1 Ijrrit I Ionic hiiiity Line of Cretin, I lit Aniui.il IVrccnlage lUte I'Al'IO is a variable rale lijjcd mi ihr highni I'ntnc Kale published 
ill Ihe Money Katrs section of Tfu IVuM Sl'ttt lour ml oil llic first business day of tlir itiimih. ilascd on Ifir Ocmlxr I. 1WS, 1'rirne Itirc ill 
B.25% the following rates would J|iply: *% Al'R lor cretin linn nt JS.00I In JM.WWrJUS* APIt for credit lino of «5,000 lo mm.H'K, 
AHKfur credit lines of 1100.000 to JJJ°,W9: and7.7S% Al'R foi credit lines of S250,OOOur metre. The maklmurn Al'K is 1*1%. The minimum 
draw amount is J5O0. A JJ5 anmtiftc*'irj'|ilies after Ihe first year. There are no olhcr coils to open the at count Costs to satisfy certain prior 
liens may he assessed Property uituiaucr is iei|iiued. Ilnod insurance may be required. Consult your tai advisor about the iledutt Utility til 
mlrrcsi Offer applies to new applications received ihrough Nou-iuher .'0, IWH. and jujilin to nwtieructupied I m-l Umih residences. 



and Seller, reported M J. Sell- 
er, co-owner of the firm. 

Bersanl is serving as the 
1998 Vice Chair of the Lake 
County Association of Real- 
tors (LCAR) Brokerage Com- 
mittee and was the LCAR Re- 
altor Associate of the Year for 

1997. In addition, Bersanl is 
active in St Gilbert's parish or- 
ganizations and is a member 
of the Grayslake Historical So- 
ciety. 

Bersanl also tied with 
Wild wood resident Undo 
Dlabay for top honors in list- 
ings taken in March with five 
each. 

Other unit sales leaders 
in November included Vol 
Dunn, Elizabeth Bryant, 
and Donna Barry. 

Tritschler named 
McShane exec. V.R 

James A. McShane, chief execu- 
tive officer of McShane Construction 
Corporation, announced that Mark 
T. Tritschler, P.E., has been named 
Executive Vice President of the firm. 

Tritschler has been a key mem- 
ber of the McShane organization 
since joining the firm in 1993 as Di- 
rector of Special Project In 1996, he 
was promoted to Vice President. 

Tritschler received both a bach- 
elor of science and masters degree in 
Civil Engineering from North Dako- 
ta State Universirjiand is a Regis- 
tered Professional Engineer in Illi- 
nois, Wisconsin and Minnesota. 

Tritschler resides in Libertyville. 

Schnoor award 
Re/Max 100% Award 

Kim Schnoor, Broker Associ- 
ate with Re/Max Advantage Realty in 
Antioch since 1985, has been award- 
ed the prestigious Re/Max Interna- 
tional 100% Award. Schnoor had 
sales of both residential and com- 
mercial real estate in the year 1997 
exceeding $4.6 million. 

In the first three months of 

1998, Schnoor sold over $2.1 mil- 
lion in real estate, both commercial 
and residential. She is the current 
president of the Fox Lake Rotary 
Club as well as vice-president of the 
school board at Grant Community 
High School. Schnoor, her husband 
Jeff, and their children live in Ingle- 
side. 




Kreuser 



Dunn 




Barry 



Tritschler 



Uckfiart-White 
is promoted 

Community Action Project of 
Lake County Executive Director Bar- 
bara A. Gordon, announced the pro- 
motion of Mary Lockhart-Whlteof 

Son to the position of Deputy Exec- 
utive Officer. 

Danaj promoted 

Lake County Board members 
appointed Mark A, Danaj of Lake 
Villa as human resources director. 

Danaj, 29, has been the depart- 
ment's acting director since August 
of 1997. He has managed daily oper- 
ations of the 13-person department, 
including risk management, em- 
ployee benefits, compensation and 
classification, recruitment, labor re- 
lations and employee relations. 

Danaj began his employment 
with Lake County in February of 
1992 as a research analyst in the 
County Administrator's Office, 
where he worked until August of 

1993. From May through August of 

1994, Danaj was a consultant at Sin- 
togokio, Ltd., in Nagoya, Japan. 
Danaj returned to Lake County in 
February of 1996 as a senior research 
analyst in the County Administra- 
tor's Office, and was promoted to an 
assistant county administrator in Au- 
gust of 1997. 

Danaj has a master of business 
administration/ finance degree from 
University of Notre Dame in South 
Bend, Ind., and a bachelors degree in 
economics and political science from 
Marquette University, Milwaukee. 



NEW BUSINESSES 



Congratulations to the following 
new Lake County businesses: 

• Perfect Ten, 560 Main Street. 
Antioch. Owned by Selina Torri; call 
{847) 395-2288. 

• Performance Machine Co., 1000 
Brown St., Unit 104, Wauconda. 
Owned by Gary Gauger; call (414) 279- 
9807. 

• Eclipse Consulting, 49 Miller 
Rd., Lake Zurich. Owned by Kelly Tri- 
ona Gufdry; call (847) 540-5938. 

• Graphic Ventures, 2670 N. 
Acorn Dr., Round Lake Beach. Owned 
by Linda Finkelman; call (847) 265- 
2750. 

• Prime Solutions Computing 
Consultants, 37194 N. Route 59, Lake 
Villa. Owned by John Nichols; call 
(773) 235-0249. 



• Midwest Hapkldo, 2303 Coun- 
tryside Ln., Undenhurst. Owned by 
Bruce W. Sims; call (847) 265-7225. ' 

• Laura's Luv 'n Care, 18544 W. 
Main St., Gages Lake. Owned by Laura 
Dickens; call(847) 548-9601. 

• Candy Creations, 902 Pine Hill 
Dr., Antioch. Owned by Judith Alders; 
call (047) 838-5762. v 

• The Heritage Dental Group, 22 1 
N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville. 
Owned by Brian R. Guidbek DDS; call 
(847) 362-4994, 

• Deigan and Associates, 908 
Wheeler Court, Libertyville. Owned by 
Gary J. Deigan; call (847) 362-9356. 

• Topsail Communications, 42 
N. Holly Ave., Fox Lake. Owned by 
Maureen A. Lllleeng; call (847) 587- 
9771. 



F 



: \ 

• :■ . 



K! 



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1 ) ■ 

mis 



ELECTION '98 



■•,-■■ 



C 1 2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



November 3, 1998 - General Election Results 



November 6; 1998 



United States Senator 

Carol Moseley-Braun (D) 1,566,955 

Don A. Torgersen {Ref.J 73,929 

%f Peter G. Fitzgerald (R) . . .1,698,092 






Governor and Lieutenant 
Governor 



Glenn W. Poshard (Dj . l,S(,0, i ra 
Mary Lou Ki'arns iD) . I Mil). 5 \"i 
I .nvrenct' Redmond <Rrt 4') W 1 
Pin His Nirvhj Rei'i #4**9 

I ~0I ."•(< 

1 1 1 I "» ! I . ~ 



Y <■ ' '"i>nt' G V\i Ki(f K 



Attorney General 

MiN.mt \intn% ,M Ml' 1 "<H « 

1 ■ U Dimrll IK Krl '.I II H 

%r i,.. k\.„- k i WW .'rw 



Secretary of State 



>.:•■'!'. I Ulllatll Kt'f 

\ s ■ . i R 



toijttw 

i pu .mo 



Comptroller 

Y . J.imel U IKni-Ml) 



1 "12.642 

IKtstmin \Ulii!ii'.liS.nll. ■ :: Kfi "),2i0 
( Mm l.ui/cn .Ri I 246 717 



Treasurer 

_%L_ Diinu'l ). Mdau^hhn it) mm, 44-1 

Valuric Hain 'Rpfi r,n,2{}<l 

Judy B,uir Topink.i iR. .1.5b9. »J() 



Representative in Congress 
8th Dist. 

Mike Rothman (D) 19,781 

• Philip M. Crane (R) 47,362 



Regional Superintendent of 
Schools 

V Edward J. Gonwa (R) 1 12,707 



. 



Lake County Board Member 



-District IS 

Carol Calabresa (R) . ! ..+,■. ,;;6,028 



. <■-■ 



/ 



State Senator 26th 
Legislative Dist. 



William E. Peterson (R) 



.68,167 



Representative in General 
Assembly Slst Rep. Dist. 

V Sidney Mathias (RI 14.506 

Representative in General 
Assembly 52nd Rep. Dist. 

Kill HuvkorD, 10,208 

Mark M Ht-aubien. U iR) . .20,140 

State Senator 
31st Leg. Dist. 

Adeline J a> Geo-Kans IR» . . .47,470 



Lake County Board Member 
- - District 1 

j£ |udy L. Martini (R) 5,480 

Lake County Board Member 
- District 2 

Jeanne L. Hewitt (D) 2,482 

tr Loretta McCarley (R) 3,416 



■ 



Lake County Board Member 
J> - District 16 

* Mary Beattle (R) 6,281 

—•—■—■—— 

Lake County Board Member 
-District 18 

_JL Pamela O. Newton (R) 5,276 



Representative in General 
Assembly 61st Rep. Dist. 

Gi-f.ildineC all.in <D» .8.501 

Andrea S Moore <R) 20,1 14 

Representative in General 
Assembly 60th Rep. Dist. 

Y_ I aurcn Beth Gash ID) 1 7,044 

■lames H. Bradner, Jr. (Rl ... .6.141 

Representative in General 
Assembly 62nd Rep. Dist. 



Lake County Board Member 

- District 7 

Glenn Ryback (D) 2,830 

V Al Westerman (R) 5,940 

Lake County Board Member 

- District 8 

v Robert Sabonjian (Dl 2,992 

Jim Stanc/ak fRj 2,549 

Lake County Board Member 

- District 9 

_JL_ Peggy Shorts ID) 2,430 

Roy Czajkowski (R) 1,399 



Lake County Board Member 

- District 20 

5. David B. Stolman (R) 5,325 

Lake County Board Member 

- District 21 

i/L Martha Marks (R) .6,639 



Lake County Board Member 
- District 23 

v Robert M. Buhai (D) 







.6,645 



JLl 



Mi< had J. Deimler iD> 



. .9,2 17 



ir 



imothy H. Osmond tR) . . . .1 7,02 1 

Lake County Clerk 

Linda lanuzi Hess (D) 67,905 

Willard R. Hclander(R) 80,277 



Lake County Treasurer 

I .ynda C. Paul TDj- 63,201 

V_ _ Robert "Skid" Skidmore (R) .79,360 

Lake County Sheriff 

Marlene A. Runyard ID) ... .58,140 
Gary Del ReiRl 86,223 



Lake County Board Member 

- District 10 

j£ Diana O'Kelly (R) 6,031 

Lake County Board Member 
-District 11 

g£ Sandy Cole (R) 6,335 

Lake County Board Member 

- District 12 

If Angelo D. Kyle (D) 2,1 79 

Walter J. White (R) 612 

Lake County Board Member 

- District 14 



Trustee - North Shore 
Sanitary District - Ward 2 

V Mark Hawn (D) 6,130 

Jack "Red" Anderson (R) 4.220 



Trustee - North Shore 
Sanitary District - Ward 3 

*/ Eddie Washington (D) 4,097 



Trustee - North Shore 
Sanitary District - Ward 5 

Arlene Demb (D) 7,1 79 

v Louise G. Greenebaum (R) 



.8,433 



_ Audrey H. Nixon (D) 



.1,533 







Referenda Questions 



CITIES & VILLAGES 

City of Zlon 

Shall the City of /.ion. I ake t'ount\, Illinois he 
come a httme rule unit, pursuant to Attn fl* \'// 
Set lion dial ol the Illinois ( niislitulioni' 

YIS I.O'rt / \( > .' lit i 

Village of Lake Zurich 

Shall the Village of Like /.urn h het time J httme 
rule unit pun,u.mt tu the .tuf/ionf> ftr.mtvtl />> At 
tide Vtt, Setttun dui at the lihmns ( unsMutwn 

YFS \.-i<i? / NO l.-J'-l 



FIRE PROTECTION 
DISTRICTS 

Llncolnshlre-Rlverwoods F.P.D. 

Sh.ill the extension limitation under the I'roperly 
Fax Extension Limitation Law tor the Lin- 
colnshircRivcrwoods Fire Protection District, 
formerly known as the Vernon Fire Protection 
District, be increased from 3,3% to 43% for the 
1 998 levy yearf 

S YES 2,777 NO 2 JUS 

Gray slake F.P.D. 

Shall the extension limitation under the Property 
Tax Extension Limitation Law for the Crayslake 
Fire Protection District, Lake County, Illinois be 
increased from 1.7% to 45.7% for the 1998 levy 
yeart 

/ YES 3,750 NO 3,502 

PARK DISTRICTS 

Wauconda Park District 

Shall the Wauconda Park District be authorized 
to levy and collect an additional tax of not to ex- 



i »•»•</ Ui".. Hit .lit i nr/KJufr fmtfHXr's ,i\ pnn uktti 
m Sc< nun r , i ,n the Park /Jisrnr I < wlt't 

. _. WS 74J / \() f. I'M 



SCHOOL DISTRICTS 

Grass Lake School District Number 36 

S/i,j// the debt servu p exten&iun hate' untU-t the 
I'riiperl) lax I \tensitm I rmit.itnm I aw inr the 
C#r,is«. ( ake Sf html Outfit I Kumher 16, I .ike 
( uuntv. llktmia, hit payment til pt tin ipal ami m 
tetest on limited tmath lie t'\tahliihed Jl S f r>,il(lt) 
lot llw I't'tH le\ v veat ant! alt \uh\etiiienl h-\ \ 

. /_. YIS4',H _ . . NO </""> 



Big Hollow School District Number 38 

Shall the Board of F.dut ation of Big Hollow 
School District Number 38, Lake County, Illi- 
nois, build and equip a school building, alter, re- 
pair and equip existing school buildings, pur- 
chase and improve a new school site, and ac- 
quire and equip playgrounds, recreation 
grounds, athletic fields, and other buildings and 
land used or useful for school purposes and issue 
bonds of said School District in the amount of 
$7,500,000 for said purposes? 1 

/ YES b88 NO Mil 

Community High School 
District Number 156 

Shall the Board of Education of Community High 
School District Number 156, McHenry and Lake 
Counties, Illinois, be authorized to acquire a 
new high school site, build and equip school fa- 
cilities thereon and improve said site, and alter, 
repair, renovate and build and equip additions to 
the West Campus facilities, and issue bonds of 



llie 'Jisfnrf ihereltir hi llif sum oi • S4li.O(U),0(H)f 
..„ YiS /_ NO 



McHenry Community Number 15 

Shall the Hoard of 1 rlui alinn of Mcllenr\ ( tun- 
mumiy Consolidated School District Crmuibdat- 
etl St html IhsltH t Number 1 S, Mt t fenry and 
lake ( ounties. Illinois, alter, repair and equip 
it hoot hutltlmgs ol saitl Si hunt Distnt t. build 
anil etftiip an .itlthtmn In an existing u html 
btiiltling ui saitl St hoot Uislnt I. build and equip 
a ne\*t \t hunt htnltling as may be net ev,ary, pur 
i hase a st hutil site with a huiltlmg thereon and 
alter, tepait antl etfuip the building tt>r si hool 
imrposrs. antl issue bonds ol saitl Sr hool Distrn t 
to the amount ol SJS.IIOU.tHH) (or said purpose? 
/ Yl S N(J 

Fox Lake Grade School No. 1 14 

Shall the Hoard of Education of Fox lake Grade 
School District District No. 114, Lake County, 
Illinois, build and equip an addition to and alter, 
repair and improve the Stanton School Building 
and issue bonds of said School District to the 
amount of 5 \2, 300,000 for said purpose? 
. YES 1.020 / NO 1,114 

Graystake Community High 
District Number 127 

Shall the Board of Education of Crayslake Com- 
munity High School District Number 127, Lake 
County, Illinois, acquire a site for school purpos- 
es, build and equip additions to and later, repair 
and equip the Crayslake High School Building 
and issue bonds of said School District to the 
amount of $20,000,000 for said purposed 

S YES 3,943 NO 3,868 



Waukegan Community Unit School 
District No. 60 

Shall the Board of Education of Waukegan Com- 
munity Unit School District No. 60 be autho- 
rized to (1) issue bonds up to $33,158,000 for 
the purpose ol repairing, renovating and equip- 
ping portions of all elementary and middle 
schools, including enlarging and improving 
properly for the Caman, Whitticr and North 
School sites; building additions to and equipping 
the McCall and Clcnwood Schools; remodeling 
the Lincoln Center site to build and equip an ele- 
mentary school thereon; building and equipping 
a new middle school at the Monroe/Butrick 
Street site; remodeling and equipping the Fresh- 
man Center, Waukegan High School and the Ca- 
reer Academy; and renovating Weiss Field and 
other athletic facilities; and (2) build and equip 
the new middle school? 

/ YES 8,375 NO 4,023 

LIBRARY DISTRICTS 

Zion-Benton Public Library District 

Shall the annual public library tax rate for The 
Zion-Benton Public Library District, Lake Coun- 
ty, Illinois, be established at .22% of full, fair 
cash value instead of at . 15%, the maximum rate 
otherwise applicable to the next taxes to be ex- 
tended? 

YES 3,385 / NO 5, 1 80 

Antloch Public Library District 

Shall the annual public library tax rate for the 
Antioch Public Library District, Lake County, Illi- 
nois, be established at 0.235% of full, fair cash 
value instead of at 0. 15%, the maximum rate 
otherwise applicable to the next taxes to be ex- 
tended? 

/ YES 2,810 NO 2,582 






■ 
■ - . 



stfc-J.W^v-^itWfUaMs^T-WI^TfJ^TS 



..- — -,...» m jrf»Htt»» 



•A':-,/ 



-J J — »* M . f «< 






" ~ " 



November $,199Q 




■■• 



■ 

V" - . ■ 









Lakeland Newspapers f"/pjfj3.-_ 



A Fluieral Home Serving 
All Your Needs 



Over 50 Years Of Caring, Dignified Service 



UVrvl*"- *M*F 



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Pre-Planning ♦ Cremation Services 
Serving McHenry & Lake Counties 
♦ Out Of State Arrangements ♦ All Faiths 
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Funeral Home Ltd. 



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I2.N. I'lSTAKKK I..AKK Ul> • I'OX LAKE r— n iV~"WJ 
EST OK K f. 12 - 1/2 ItLOCK .NORTH OF GRAND UK, 



DEATH NOTICES 

WICK (nee HOFFMAN) 

Sally Marie Wick (nee Hoffman), age 58, of 

Gumee 

Arr: Knollcresl Funeral Home, [.ombard 

SCIIWAGER 

William H. Schvvager, 95, of Gurnee 
Arr: Congdon Funeral Home, Zion 

MAXWELL 

Donald R. Maxwell, age A3, ofWadsvvonh 
Arr: Marsh Funeral Home of Waukegan 



BROWN 

Susie A, Brown, age 81 of Ubertyville 
Am ) usten's Round Lake Funeral Home 

CLARKE 

Jerry N. Clarke, age 58, of Mundelein 
Arr: Krislan Funeral Home, Mundelein 

DUNCAN 

Patrick A. Duncan, age 44, of Mundelein 
Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home. 
Libertyville 



The Deadline for Obituaries & Death Notices 
is 10 a.m. on Tuesdays. 



"<3- 
7 
7 



1- 



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Newspapers 






«»!Fd& ■&&'•£«. ,t'.jh.; 






■: * ,* 



JU S TEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court {Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen, Jeffrey Jordan, Directors 

Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd., P.O. Box 65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

(815) 675-0550 or Toll Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 



Kenneth Ghristensen 

-. Age 86 passed away on Saturday, Oct.31,199B at Condell 

Medical Center, Ubertyville. He was bom on Jan. 9, 1912 In 

Charievoix, Mi. and resided In Mundelein for 30 years before 

: eventually settling in Friendship, Wis. He was employed with 

' Fansteel which he retired from after 35 years as well as 20th . 

'- Century which he retired from after 25 years. He was former 

member of the Santa Maria dd Popolo Church. 

He leaves his daughters Carrie (Ron) KrepUn of Grayslake; 
Gloria (Phil) Spyrison of Grayslake; and a son, Ken (Carol) 
Chrtsiensen of Colorado; eight grandchildren, and 11 great 
grandchil drcn. He Is preceded in death by his wife Evelyn (nee 
Klajbor) after 52 years of marriage. 

A Funeral Mass of the Resurrection was held at St 
Gilbert^ Church, Grayslake. 
Interment was private. 

In lieu or flowers, donations may be made to the Kidney 
Foundation or the Leukemia Foundation. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium. 410 E Belvidere, Grayslake, IL 60030. 

Ethel J. Benning 

Age 89 of Lake Villa, passed away on Saturday, Oct 31, 
1998 at the Pavilion Health Care Center In Waukegan. She was 
bom In Chicago on March 31, 1909, the daughter of Emma 
and Joseph Hermann. 

She is survived by her daughter Carol Vasey of Lake Villa, 
and 13 grandchildren and 27 great grandchildren. She is pre- 
ceded In death by her husband, Albert, and her children. 
Albert, Virginia, Beverly, Leroy and James. 

Funeral Services were private 

Interment was at Randhill Cemetery, Arlington Heights. 

Arrangements were made by Ringa Funeral Home, Lake 
Villa. 

Mary H„ Shannon 

Age 85 of Antioch, passed away Friday, Oct 30, 199B at 
Hillcrest Nursing Center, Round Lake Beach. She was bom 
Oct 7, 1913 In Blue bland, the daughter of the late Anthony 
and Rose (Klsel) Shramek She moved to Antioch in 1937 and 
had been a member of St. Peter Church In Antioch. On April 
24, 1937, she married Willis Shannon In Chicago, and he pre- 
ceded her In death on Dec 11, 1989. 

Survivors Include her daughter, Dorothy (Ed) Nelson of 
Menominee, Mich.; two grandchildren, Randal (Karen) nelson 
and left (LuAnn) Nelson and four great grandchildren, Karie, 
Randal Jr., Cody and Ashley, all of Menominee, Mich.-, one sis- 
ter, Helen Jackson of Wilmington, and many nieces and 
nephews. In addition to her husband, she is preceded In death 
by one sister, Rose radian and one brother, Anthony Shramek. 
A special thanks to all those who loved and cared for Mary. 

Funeral Services were held al the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Robert Leslto 

Age 44 of Antioch, went to be with the "Lord," Oct. 30, 
1998 at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan, after suffering 
an apparent hean attack while at work in Antioch. He was 
bom Aug. 17, 1954 in Chicago, the son of the late George and 
Violet (Sipinskis) Lesko moving to Antioch in 1967. He attend- 
ed the Antioch Evangelical Free Church and worked as n sheet 
metal worker for Prestige Metals in Antioch. His hobbies 
included car model building, fishing and CB Radio operating. 
On June 14, 1986 he married Debra Alterio in Antioch. 

Survivors include his wife Debra, his daughter, Stephanie, 
two sisters, Pamela (Morton) Papenfuss of Woodworth, Wis., 
and Linda (Charics) Hopkins of San Antonio, Tex. He is the 
son-in-law of Jerry and Rose Alterib of Chicago. 

Funeral Services were held at the Antioch Evangelical Free 
Church, Antioch with Pastor David Croleau, officiating. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Cecilia R. Piskor 

Age 88 of Antioch. passed away, Monday, Nov. 2, 1998 al 
Winchester House, LibenyviUc. She was bom July 19, 1910 in 
Chicago, the daughter of the late Ignac and Aloysia Heteniak. 
She had lived in Chicago for many years before moving to 
Antioch in 1990, where she wasamember of St. Peter Church. 
Before her retirement, she had worked as a cook and cafeteria 
server. 

Survivors include her son, Thomas (Dorothy) Piskor of 
Antioch; three grandchildren, Laura (Kevin) Gregory, Veronica 
(lames) McFadden and Susanne (Kevin) Kufahl and six great 
grandchildren, Sarah, Thomas, Joshua, Arron, Rachael and 
Christopher. She is preceded in death by her husband, 
Thomas S. on July 28, 1952; two sisters, Anna Heteniak. and 
Mary Simkus and two brothers, James and William Heteniak. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial was held at 
St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Andoch. 

Interment was at St. Adalbert Cemetery, Niles. 

Rita Lillian ZuUo 

Age 81 of Antioch, passed away Friday, Oct. 30, 1998at her 
home She was bom May 6, 1917 in Castle Shannon, Penn.,the 
daughter of the late Martin and Annie Laily. Mrs. Zullo had 
lived in Chicago, as a child, moving to Mt. Prospect In 1962, to 
Lake Villa in 1968 and settled in Antioch in 1978 where she has 
been a long time resident. In 1 956 she married Charies Zullo in 
Chicago. 

Mrs. Zullo is survived by her husband Charles; one son, 
Ronald (Annmarie) Zullo of Salem, Wis. and two daughters, 
Carol (Kenneth) Gabrys of Algonquin, and Judl (Dennis) Boer 



of Aslito n. She was the grandmother of 13 and great grand- 
mother of seven, the aunt of Martin Marker, Barbara Tuclbat, 
alla^iKatzbc^Emd^laJryVadmanddleBrea^auntofrnany 
nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Zullo is 
preceded In death by her sisters, Mary Delaney, Rosanne ' 
Delaney, Alice Marker and Helen Marker; 

Funeral Services with Mass ofChristian Burial was held at 
SL Benedicts Abbey, Benet Lake, Wis. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Andoch. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial Park in Ubertyville 

In lieu of flowers, those desiring may make contributions 
to Sl Benedicts Abbey In her memory. 

Nora (Krapohl) Thuma 

Age 55 of Round Lake, died Wednesday, Oct 28, 1998 at 
Evanston Hospital She was the wife of Richard S. Thuma of 
Round Lake and the daughter of the late Geraldlne and Robert 
Krapohl of ML PleasanL Nora and Richard Thuma were mar- 
ried on May 17, 1975 In Washington, DC Bom In Grand 
Rapids. Mich, on Sept. 5, 1943, her family moved to ML 
Pleasant in 1950. Mrs. Thuma graduated from MPHS In 1961 
received her BS degree from the University of Michigan In 
1965, and later received an MS In microbiology from the 
University of Massachusetts. She began her career in microbi- 
ology as a researcher at Georgetown University and later 
focused on environmental investigations for Atlantic Research 
Corp. in Springfield, Va. After moving to Miami, Fla. in 1978, 
she took a position with Pananlculau Cancer Center of the 
University of Miami. For the past five years, she has lived in the 
Chicago area where she worked for Fujisawa Pharmaceuticals 
in their clinical studies department. Mrs. Thuma has always 
enjoyed recreational sports. She and her husband have been 
active supporters of the arts and wildlife conservation activi- 
ties They were fortunate to have traveled extensively to many 
parts of the world 

Mrs. Thuma Is survived by her husband, Richard and her 
sisters. (Kay (Brian) Smith of Ml Pleasant and Barbara (Paul) 
Blrckner of Fort Washington, Md. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Rev. Lisle J. 
Kaufltnan of Calvary Presbyterian Church. Round Lake offici- 
ating. 

Interment was privately held. 

Betty Ann Hern pel 

Age 63, passed away on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1998 at Rush 
Presbyterian Sl Lukes Hospital, Chicago, She was bom on 
Sept. 6, 1935 in Chicago and had made her home in Gumee. 
She was loved for her warmth, wisdom and sense of humor. 

She leaves her fiancee" Robert Kibble of Gumee; her chil- 
dren. Mare (Leslee) of Baltimore, Md.. Elise (Waqar) ofl/emon 
Hills, Ann (Robert) of Minneapolis, Minn.; grand daughter. 
Neenah; and her brother. Richard of Clearwater, Fla. 

Memorial Services were held at Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium. Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment was private. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of 
your choice. 

Myrtle Halas 

Age 86 of Antioch. passed away Tuesday, Oct. 27. 1998 at 
St. Joseph's Home for the Aged, Kenosha, Wis. She was bom 
Sept. 8. 1912 in Chicago, the daughter of the late George and 
Minerva (Shultz) Franz. She moved to Antioch in 1972 and was 
a member of St. Peter Chureh. She as also an avid bowler and 
Chicago Cub fan. Before her retirement, she worked at CE. 
Neihoff Co. of Chicago. On Oct. 29. 1938, she married John 
Halas in Chicago and he preceded her In death on April 3, 
1992. 

Survivors include three daughters, Carol (Robert) Geske 
of Antioch, Susan (Frank) Galassini of Fl Wayne, Ind. and 
Kathy (Tom) Ingiehart of Lake villa; and one sister. Lucille 
Rabschutz in ConnecticuL She was the grandmother of Susan 
(Ken) Ratajczyk, Tracy (Tony) Cesario, Tony (Irish) Galassini, 
Robin (Steve) George and Katie Dreyer, the great grandmother 
of Randy Ratajczyk. In addition to her husband, she is preced- 
ed in death by one sister, Lorretta Slowik. 

Funeral Services with Mass ofChristian Burial was held at 
St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Friends and family called at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Those desiring, may make contributions to Sl Joseph's 
Home for the Aged, 9244-29th Ave., Kenosha, Wis. 53143 in her 
memory. 

Earl C. Brandt 

Age 88, a resident of Fox Lake for over 43 years, and a for- 
mer Chicago resident, died Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1998 in his home 
He was bom on May 21, 1910 in Chicago to Fredrick and 
Minnie (nee Grambarth) Brandt, and had graduated from the 
Northwestern University in Evanston. He later served with the 
U.S, navy during WWII and the Korean War. He was a longtime 
employee with Streeter Amet In Grayslake as an accountant, 
and was a member of the Lakes Region American Legion Post 
703 of Fox Lake. 

Survivors include, his wife, Edna R. (nee Rudsinski) 
Brandt of Fox Lake; one daughter, Diane Brandt of DeKalb; 
two grandchildren, Earl Bickel of Lakewood, Colo, and Sally 
Evanson of Milwaukee, Wis. He is preceded in death by Ills first 
wife, Evelyn "Peg" Brandt in 1971, by his son, Craig E. Brandt In 
1981, and by a sister, Ruth BrandL 

Funeral Services were held at the K. K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake) with Rev. Lisle J, 
Kauffman, officiating. 

Interment was at Woods National Cemetery, Woods, Wis. 



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C 1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LEGAL NOTICES 



November 6 t 1998 



f 



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4r 

: 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS/PLAN COMMISSION 

WAUCONDA, ILLINOIS 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Petition on Tile In (he Village Clark's office 
of the Village of Wauconda that a public hearing will bo held on November 23. 1 998. 
at 7:00 p.m. In the Village Hall. Wauconda, Illinois, to hear the Petition of CHARLES 
E. WHITESEU-, as Petitioner and JANICE M. CAMPBELL, Record Owner of the fol- 
lowing described property: 

LOT 5 IN CAMPBELL'S UNIT 1, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE 
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 36. 
TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH, RANGE 9, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN. 
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 27. 19B5 AS DOCU- 
MENT NO. 2345656. IN THE VILLAGE OF WAUCONDA. LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

PARCEL 2: 

ALL THAT PART OF THE WAUKEGAN, ROCKFORD AND ELGIN TRACTION 
RAIL ROAD RIGHT OF WAY IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTH. 
WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 36. TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH. RANGE 9 EAST OF 
THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN LYING SOUTHERLY OF AN EXTENSION OF 
THE MOST WESTERLY LINE (RUNNING EAST-WEST) EXTENDED WESTERLY 
AND LYING NORTH OF THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF 
THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36 EXTENDED WESTERLY 
FROM THE MOST SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 5 IN CAMPBELL'S UNIT 
1 AS RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO 2345656 IN THE OFFICE OF THE LAKE 
COUNTY RECORDER IN THE VILLAGE OF WAUCONDA. LAKE COUNTY. ILLI 
NOIS 

The physical location of the property is on the South side ol Kent Avenue 
approximately six hundred (600) leel West of the intersection of Kent Avenue ,md Old 
Ranrj Road {Mam Street). Wauconda Illinois 

The common address <s Keni Avenue Wauconoa illmois 600B4 

Pelilione' and Record Ownors are requesting me issuance o' ConmtiO'iat Use 
Permits loi me following m opt>'atron of a landscape contractor s':»agG yn<a f»l sic 
age ol landscape contractors vehicles and equ-pmom and (im -andscape material 
Duii« sicage 

Said PetH'on is available to' examination >n m«* wage dd s office at the 
Village Ha'i '01 North Mam Street Wauconda m-no'S 

All interested persons are invited to attend s*fl "carmg a^d he heara 

Respectfully submitted 

KENNETH LOCHER. Chairman 

Wauconda Zoning Board of 

Appeals- Plan Commission 

Oated at Wauconda Illinois this 

23-d day o< November, 1998 



KENNETH LOCHER 



this DOCUMENT PREPARE-'!' 
Hu n3N> J Na*on & Assoc aies 
12' F libciy Street Su te 3 

Wa.„iT-da h'inois 60084 "929 
,847-526 0626 



Ki 



1I98A-2235-WL 
Novemtjer 6 1998 






'/: 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE PARK 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED: APRIL 30. 1998 

GENERAL CORPORATE 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 230 O04 70CH 

HE.'t NUES PROPCRTV TAXES 121 944 20 SALES TAX 195 338 03 MUNICI 
PAL J">LlTY TAX 211 520 66 VEHICLE LICENSE 21 291 00 TRUCK LICENSE 
6 65-^0 BUSINESS LICENSE 18.625 00 FRANCHISE LICENSE ILL BELL 
20 24-53 BUILDING PERMITS 56.804 47 IMPACT FEES 50.000 00 OTHER PER- 
Mil'-, & f-EES 5,50181 STATE INCOME TAX 376300 70 REPLACEMENT TAX 
3i. ! *4B0 LANDFILL AGREEMENT 15.000 00 COPS GRANT 125.831 24 COURT 
FINES 78 026 10 ORDINANCE VIOLATIONS 6.206 14 GARBAGE CHARGES 
154.02530 INTEREST INCOME 21.1 16 57 EQUIPMENT RENTAL 18.25587 
OTHER REVENUES 6.30153 BILLED EXPENSE 71,704 51 RECOVERY OF 
COSTS 7 257 73 TOTAL REVENUES 1,591,310.69 
LESS EXPENDITURES l .245,703 52 
ENDING FUND BALANCE 115.602 47 
EXPENDITURES 

1ST STATE BANK ROUND LAKE 119.037 40 ACE HARDWARE HOME CENTER 
1.270 45 ADVANTA FINANCIAL 4 741 62 AFLAC 1 1 ,414 61 ALBERT L WYSOCKI 
69.345 59 ROBERT E ALECKSON 41.424 75, ALTMANS FLORIST 115 50 AMER 
(CAN LIFE 3.089 02 AMERITECH 9.993 74 SLAM BAUER 9.1 17 86 NICHOLAS B 
BEESON 81006 DIANNE L BONNER 1.720 71 BROWNING FERRIS INDUS- 
TRIES 143.150 19 DANIEL J BURCH 30.018 19 CELLULAR ONE 6,735 98 CEN- 
COM E-9-1-1 73.090 80 DIANA A CESSNA 7.438 01 CHAPMAN AND CUTLER 
20.722 97 CLARK ENVIRONMENTAL MOSQUITO 8.095 00 CONSUMERS COOP- 
ERATIVE 26.790 00 DEVERY ENGINEERING INC 15.577 50 DICTAPHONE 
4,740 00 MICHAEL A DVORAK 2.070 00 HUMANA. INC 85.332 57 ANNA 
ESTRADA 2,070 00 SCOTT FIRNBACH 37.107 77 FIRST STATE BANK OF 
ROUND LAKE 545 60 DONALD D GARDINER 6,294 00 REBECCA L GERSTEIN 
86 25 GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING. INC 20.184 88 HARRISON LAW 
OFFICES. PC 8.000 00 HOWARD JENS 5.569 20 1LA BAUER 2,847 29 ILA M 
BAUER 3.501 47 ILL MUN RETIREMENT FUND 7,743 45 ILLINOIS DEPT OF 
REVENUE 15,573 48 INDEPENDENT INSPECTIONS 7,647 50 HOWARD JENS 
35,394 03 BRUCE N JOHNSON 58.124 21 GEORGE JOHNSON 169 64 
MELANIE KESSLER 2.370 00 CLARENCE KROPP 3.906 00 LAKELAND COMMU 
N1TY BANK 49,61 8 70 JENNIFER! LANG 3.296 50 PETER LANG l ,229 94 NICO 
LAS H LEARSCH 201 00 SHANNON V LERSCH 1.075 50 LINOA M LUCASSEN 
3,908 70' KEVIN J MAGEE 42.161 79 MAGNA & HAUSER 4.944 50 JEAN M 
MCCUE 2,070.00: MELLON FIRST UNITED LEASING 3.025 68 MIRACLE RECRE 
ATION EQUIPMENT 3,769 00 MOLIDORS INSURANCE 240 00. NORMA J NEL 
SON 14.913 76 NORTH SHORE WASTE 10 339 36 OFFICE MAX 3 016 70 DON 
ALD OTTO 25.056 00 BETHANY J PACKHElSER 1.079 00 CHRIS PACKHEISER 
130.81- WILLIAM E POIRIER 552 00 POLICE PENSION FUND 21 268 94 POST- 
MASTER ROUND LAKE 1.897 60 R&M AUTOBODY 1.547 27 RANDY R REUTER 
34,65982. MICHAEL C ROBINSON 50.171 88 ROLF C CAMPBELL & ASSOCI 
ATES 12.366.85: ROUND LAKE PARK POLICE PENSION 2,406 46 JOEY J SMITH 
73.50. MICHAEL P. STACHULA 28.656.56. DAN E SUCHOWSKI 4.872 00 PATRICK 
J. SUCHOWSKI 684,32 JOHN R TEUBERT 2.070 00 KHALI A THAYASUT 
31.912.43 THOMAS MCGUIRE & ASSOC. LTD 6.000 00 UNOCAL 32 741 16 
DANIEL R. VEIT 34,018 69 KENNETH J WICH 8,019 63 TINA M WILLIAMS 
25.533.23 JON C.WILTBERGER 18,275.00 ANDREW J ZIE8ELL 849 14 
LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE' 240 343 84 
GENERAL CORPORATE TOTAL 1 ,245,703.52 
MOTOR FUEL TAX FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE B3 1 11 76 

REVENUES: MOTOR FUEL TAX 114,766 16 

INTEREST INCOME 2.103 43 

TOTAL REVENUES 1 16,869.59 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 58.107 48 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 1 4 i .873 87 

EXPENDITURES: 

AMSTON SUPPLY, INC 4,469.41: MELLON FIRST UNITED LEASING 252 14 
NORTH AMERICAN SALT COMPANY 13.252.84 SKOKIE VALLEY ASPHALT 
7.168.00: 

LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE. 30.649.47CR' 
MOTOR FUEL TAX FUND TOTAL 58,107.48 
I.M.R.F. FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 
REVENUES: PROPERTY TAX 
TOTAL REVENUES 58.514.29 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 
ENDING FUND BALANCE 
EXPENDITURES: 

1ST STATE BANK ROUND LAKE 55,718.45: ILL. MUN. RETIREMENT FUND 
12,852.56: POLICE PENSION FUND 204.55: 

LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 10,452.70: 
I.M.R.F. FUNDTOTAL 59,522.16 
ROAD & BRIDGE 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 19,873.08 

REVENUES: ROAD & BRtOGE TAX 4.564.63 

TOTAL REVENUES 4.564.63 



18,036 34 
58.514.29 

59.522.16 
17,026.47 



317.70 
57.285.64 

55,000.00 
2.603.54 



3,426.44 



7,300.00 
3,367.99 



19,640.57 
27,54376 

35.07297 
12.111.36 



LESS-EXPENDITURES 18.608.75 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 5,834.96 

1ST STATE BANK ROUND LAKE 3.217.78: ILL MUN. RETIREMENT FUND 662.46: 
ILLINOIS DEPT OF REVENUE 518.68: DAN E. SUCHOWSKI 1B.51fl.75: 
LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 4,384.81 : 
ROAD & BRIDGE TOTAL 18,608.75 
LIABILITY INSURANCE 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 

REVENUES: PROPERTY TAX 

TOTAL REVENUES 57.285.84 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 

EXPENDITURES: M „„ 

ILLINOIS PUBLIC RISK FUND 26.518.00: MOLIDORS INSURANCE 40.399.00: 
LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 11,917.00: 
UABIUTY INSURANCE TOTAL 55.000.00 
AUDIT FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 

REVENUES: PROPERTY TAXES 7,24 1 .55 

TOTAL REVENUES 7.241.55 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 
ENDING FUND BALANCE 
EXPENDITURES: 

VEATCH. RICH & NADLER 8.450.00: 

LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUOEO ABOVE: 1,150.00: 
AUDIT FUND TOTAL 7,300.00 
POLICE PROTECTION 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 
REVENUES. PROPERTY TAX 
TOTAL REVENUES 27,543. 7( 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 
ENDING FUND BALANCE 
EXPENDITURES 

1ST STATE BANK ROUND LAKE 6.672.35: DONALD D GARDINER 765.00: ILLI- 
NOIS DEPT OF REVENUE 837 58: CLARENCE KROPP 396.00: WILLIAM E POIRI- 
ER 72.00: POLICE PENSION FUND 2.168 39: ROUND LAKE PARK POLICE PEN- 
SION 225 20: DANIEL R. VEiT 7,896 40 KENNETH J. WICH 21 ,586.50. 
LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 5,548.45: 
POLICE PROTECTION TOTAL 35.072.97 
DEBT SERVICE FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 746 50 

REVENUES: PROPERTY TAX 316.429 74 

TOTAL REVENUES 316.429 74 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 306.371 80 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 10,804 44 

EXPENDITURES: 

AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK 306.528 05 

LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 158.25: 
DEBT SERVICE FUNDTOTAL 306,371.80 
WATER FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 2.193.467.92 

REVENUES PENALTIES 16.53: 

TAGS/SHUT OFF 5.576.20 

WATER SALES 643,457.70: 

TAP ON FEES 6,100.00: 

METER SALES 2.224.28: 

INTEREST INCOME 25,787.97: 

TOTAL REVENUES 683,162.68 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 551.356.63 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 2.325.273.97 

EXPENDITURES 

1ST STATE BANK ROUND LAKE 15,908.27: ACE HARDWARE HOME CENTER 
2 328 86 CASE CREDIT 11,133.97: CELLULAR ONE 257.93: CENTRAL LAKE 
COUNTY JOINT 211.614.97: DIANA A. CESSNA 6,377.15: CONSUMERS COOP- 
ERATIVE 5,865 00 HUMANA, INC. 19,810.99: ALPHONSE S. FALCO 12,433.68: 
SCOTT FIRNBACH GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING, INC. 12,1 16.93: ILL MUN. 
RETIREMENT FUND 3.150.21: ILLINOIS DEPT OF REVENUE 2.346.00: ILLINOIS 
PUBLIC RISK FUND 16,170.00: GEORGE JOHNSON 45.008.55: UN DA M. 
LUCASSEN 2.307 92 MOLIDORS INSURANCE 12,028.52: NORMA J. NELSON 
6.883 28 POSTMASTER ROUND LAKE 3,074.48: R&M AUTO BODY 150.00: 
PATRICK J SUCHOWSKI 9.800.91: U.S. FILTER LAKE BLUFF 2,786.00: UNOCAL 
5.429.74 

LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS 
1 32,620. 13CR: 

WATER FUNDTOTAL 551,356.63 
SEWER FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 410.524.27 

REVENUES PENALTIES 19.118.39: 

SEWER CHARGES 1 18,415.40: 

TAP ON FEES 9.200.00: 

L C. R.S ADMINISTRATIVE 
CHARGES 25,644.66: 

INTEREST INCOME 50,31: 

TOTAL REVENUES 172.428 76 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 133.209.21 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 449.743.82 

EXPENDITURES- 

1ST STATE BANK ROUND LAKE 5.228 17: ACE HARDWARE HOME CENTER 
260 08 AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK 156.25: DIANA A. CESSNA 6,907.52: COM- 
MONWEALTH EDISON 30.698 70 CONSUMERS COOPERATIVE 1,450.00: 
HUMANA, INC 6,337 91: ALPHONSE S FALCO 10.81 2.1 2: FIRST STATE BANK OF 
ROUND LAKE 6,663 03 GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING. INC. 8.076.94: ILL 
MUN RETIREMENT FUND 1,073,83; ILLINOIS DEPT OF REVENUE 797.80: ILLI- 
NOIS RISK FUND 8.0B5.00 LAKE COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS 314.715.80: LINDA 
M LUCASSEN 2.308.0B: R&M AUTO BODY 1,25000: DAN. E. SUCHOWSKI: 
PATRICK J SUCHOWSKI 8,057.21: 

LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 289,481.99: 
SEWER FUNDTOTAL 133,209.21 
POLICE PENSION FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 307,196.89 

REVENUES PROPERTY TAXES 56,768.56: 

INVESTMENT EARNINGS 18,349.30: 
EMPLOYEE 

CONTRIBUTIONS 30,271.26: 

TOTAL REVENUES 105,389.12 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 17.637.01 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 394.949.00 

EXPENDITURES: 

ROUND LAKE POLICE PENSION 73.020.26: 

LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 55,383.25: 
POLICE PENSION FUNDTOTAL 17,637.01 
CAPITAL PROJECTS 



INCLUDED ABOVE: 



20,543.37 
125,137.06: 

24.751.25: 

2,000.00: 

168,957.71 
3.473.97 



BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 
REVENUES. CDB GRANT 

LAKE COUNTY 
FLOOD GRANT 
SANITARY DISTRICT 
GRANT 
TOTAL REVENUES 151,888.31 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 
ENDING FUND BALANCE 
EXPENDITURES: 

DEVERY ENGINEERING. INC 28.570.50: FIORDIROSA AND SONS 73.341.06: 
LENNY HOFFMAN EXCAVATING INC. 69,922.90: 

LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 2,876.75: 
CAPITAL PROJECT TOTAL 188.957.71 

CERTIFICATION 
I, LEE J. HOWARD, TREASURER Of VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE PARK. LAKE 
COUNTY. Illinois do hereby certify that the above is a true copy of the Annual 
Treasurer's Repoft for the fiscal year ending APRIL 30, 1998. 
fe/ Lee J. Howard 
Treasurer 

119BA-2241-RL 
November 6, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
SNOW REMOVAL 

District 114 Is seeking bids to 
remove enow from Stanton, Forest, 
Glen and Lotus Schools. Interested 
pe repns may obtain a list of specifica- 
tions from the Administrative Office 
located at 17 N. Forest, Fox Lake. 
Phone 847-587-8275. All bids must be 
received by 3:00 PM, November '17, 
1998. Board of Education reserves the 
right to reject any or all bids; '■ ,'• ■ - - 
Stephen A. Shuda, Ph. D.- : -. 
Superintendent . ■-,'/./• 

1188A-2238-GEN 
November 6, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ADOPTION NOTICE 
STATE OF ILUNOIS ) 

) SS. 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 

OF THE NINETEENTH 

JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, 

LAKE COUNTY. (LUNOIS 

GEN..N0.98AD 
IN THE MATTER OF 
THE PETITION OF ' ) 

MARY DOE and JOHN DOE, ) 
Petitioners. ) 



TO ADOPT 

KELSEY M. TRANOWSKI, ) 

A minor, and t 

ALL TO WHOM (T V 

MAY CONCERN. ) 

Respondents. j 

NOTICE OF PUBUCATIflN 

Take notice that a petition was tiled 
In the Circuit Court of Lake County, 
Illinois, for the adoption of a child 
named KELSEY M. TRANOWSKI. 
Now, therefore, unless you, ALL TO 
WHOM IT MAY CONCERN, file your 
answer to the Petition In the action or 
otherwise file your appearance there- 
in, In the said Circuit Court of Lake 
County, Room 104, in the City of 
Waukegan, Illinois, on or before the 30 
day of Nov., 1998, a default may be 
entered against you at any time after 
that day and a judgment entered In 
accordance with the prayer of said 
Petition. 
DATED: 
ENTER: 
Oct. 19. 1998 
/a/Sally D. Coffelt 

CLERK OF THE COURT 
Bridget W. Hutchen 
191 E. Deerpath Ste 202 
Lake Forest, 1L 60045 
847-295-4100 
847-295-5299 (fax) 

Attorney for Petitioners.. „ ■ . -\r^-j. 
irr'j^T? 109ae.222S-LB-~ 

7 - November 8, 1B98 

November 13, 1998 



Ml 




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November 6^998 






- ' ?■ : i 



Lc&landNewspapersl C15 




?&*j$| 



J 



ByLEEFlLAS 
Staff Reporter _ 





Al Salvi is returning home. 

"I think It's time for me to return 
back to my private life now," Salvi 
said from his 'home, 12 hours 
removed from his bid to become 
Illinois Secretary of State. Tm lucky. 
I've been blessed with six wonderful 
children and a wonderful wife and a 
successful law practice. I enjoy serv- 
ing the public but I think it's time to 
return to my private life." 

Salvi's return home comes after 
losing to Jessie White In the 
Secretary of State race by a final tally 
of 1,707,526 to 1,392,240. 

This is Salvi's second failed 
attempt at state-wide public office. 
The Lake County native failed to 
carry the vote two years ago, losing 
to Dick Durbln In the U.S. Senate 
Race in 1996. Prior to the Senate 
race, Salvi served in the Illinois State 
House from 1992 until 1996. 

This shows that Illinois is still a 
very Democratic state," Salvi said. "If 
you look at the numbers with Pete 
(Fitzgerald] and George {Ryan), you 
will see that these races were a lot 
closer than expected. And, Pete was 
up against a troubled incumbent 
and spent 15 million on his cam- 
paign, and it was a real noil biter. It 
didn't end until 150 In the morn- 
ing." 



According to Salvi, some other, 
reasons for the voter swing against 
his campaign was high name recog- 
nition by White. 

"Jesse White is a beloved man In 
Illinois/* Salvi said. "He has the turn-, 
biers, does a lot for the community 
and is well known for that I'm just 
happy that we ran a very positive 
campaign against him, we stuck to 
the issues and stayed on he issues. 

"I called him and asked him to 
implement some of my ideas," Salvi 
said. "1 feel that specialty license 
plates to help the schools is a good 
Idea and would do a lot of good in 
the state." 

Salvi's main running point was 
issuing specialty license plates to 
motorists with proceeds from the 
plates going to help out Illinois 
schools. 

"I'm disappointed in that the 
campaign turned a little negative on 
his part In the end, but I'm not 
blaming the loss on that negativity," 
Salvi said. That's just politics. I'm 
not going to cast the blame for any- 
thing like that." 

"I feel lucky after losing," Salvi 
said. "I have the love of a beautiful 
family, I live in a wonderful country 
and I have a successful law practice 
to put bread on the family table. This 
gives me more time to spend with 
my family, so there axe some plusses 
to this loss." 



v. 



Congrats all around 

Bob Skidmore is congratulated by his wife, Ingrid Skidmore, and his mother, Edna Skidmore, as 
he leads Lynda Paul In the polls Tuesday night In the election for Lake County Treasurer at the Lake 
County Building In Waukegan.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 






'«-*. 




THE 

DEADLINE 

FOR 

LEGAL 

NOTICES 

IS 
TUESDAY: 
. AT , 
10 A.M. 



Undisputed winner 

State Senator Adeline Geo-Karis, who was unopposed, waits 
for results of Tuesday night's election with legislative aide 
Irene Valavanis at Mldlane Country Club in Wadsworth.— 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 



FROM PAGE CI 



**"**-*■•■• - - --.T.".--. 



INCUMBENT: Helander 
rehired by narrow margin 



the personalities. 

"I talked about management 
styles, people skills and philoso- 
phies," she said. "1 also talked 
about the high turnover in the 
office and spending. I felt these 
were issues that needed to 
raised." 

Hess said she felt the abol- 
ishment of the straight party 
ticket voting helped her cam- 
paign a lot. 

"It was definitely a benefit, 



people had to vote for the candi- 
date," she said. "I ran a good 
campaign with good people." 

Hess said she may be back in 
politics again one day. 

"Right now I'm going to 
spend some time with my family 
and have no chaos in my life," she 
said. "I never say never (to run- 
ning again). You life doesn't go in 
one straight line. You want to be 
open to accept challenges as they 
come." 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome. They should be on topics of 

general interest, approximately 250 words or less. All letters must be signed, 

and contain a home address and telephone number. The editor reserves the 

right to condense all letters. 

Send letters to: Lakeland Newspapers 

Attn: Letters to the Editor 
30 S. Whitney St., Qrayslake, IL 60030 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Club Chic 
ADORESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR 
TRANSACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
578 Greenbay Court, Lake Zurich. IL 
60047. (847)540-6533. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF 
THE PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Irene Pazlk, 578 
Greenbay Ct. Lake Zurich, IL 60047. 
(847)540-6533. Lori Bosi, 2 Marberry, 
Prospecl Heights, IL 60070. 
(847)506-1598. Chris Goreki. 3413 E. 
Mardart, Long Grove, IL 60047. 
(847)438-4728. Carol Ann Kunz. 
7107 N. Osceola, Chicago, IL 60631 
(773)763-5564. Kay Iwanskl. 2239 
Tremont Ave., Aurora, IL 60504. 
(630)238-038B. Cyndy Ryva, 744 5 
Main, Lombard, IL 60148. (630)495- 
2237. Donna Wright. 611 
Cherrywood, Wheeling, IL 60090 
(847)541-4971. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify thai the 
undersigned intend(s) to conduct the 
above named business from the 
locatlon(s) indicated and that the true 
or real full name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or transacting the 
business is/are correct as shown, 
/s/lrene Pazik, September 12, 1998 
/s/Lori Bosi, September, 1 2, 1 998 
/s/Christine Gorski, September 12, 
1898 

/s/Carol Ann Kunz, September 12, 
1998 

/s/Kay Iwanskl. September 12, 1998 
/s/Cyndy Ryva, September 12, 1998 
/s/Oonna Wright, September 12, 1998 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the 
person(s) Intending to conduct the 
business this 12th day of September, 
1998. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/a/Armando C. Duran 

Notary Public 

Received: October 22, 1996 

Willard R, Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1198A-2248-WL 

November 6, 1998 

November 13, 1698 

November 20, 1998 







' 



So close, yet so far 

Lynda Paul, watches' election results Tuesday evening at the Lake 
County Building in Waukegan with husband Cliffton and son CI iff ton, 
Jr., 10. Paul tost the election for Lake County Treasurer to Bob 
Skidmore. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



STATE OF ILLINOIS 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

THIS IS AN EFFOHTTO COLLECT A 
DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED 
WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE 
COUNTY OF COOK ) 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 



» 
j SS 



BRICKYARD BANK, 

an Illinois Financial Institution. 

Plaintiff, 



) 



No. 98CH 014551 



MICHAEL G. KAPLAN; PEGGY S.) 
KAPLAN; NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS 
and -UNKNOWN OWNERS*. 

Dofendartts. 

AFFIDAVIT FOR PUBUCATIOM AS TO UNKNOWN 

OWNERS ANQ NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS 
Kenneth R, Rosenborg, being first duly $wom on oath states that he Is one of the 
attorneys and duty authorized agent of Plaintiff in this behalf. 

Affiant states In addition to persons designated by name herein, there are other 
persons who are Interested In this action who have or claim to have somo right, title, 
Interest, or lien In, to or upon the real estate, or some part thereof, as described, such 
as the unknown spouses of Michael G. Kaptan and/or Peggy S. Kaplan. The name of 
each of such other persons Is unknown to Plaintiff and on diligent Inquiry cannot be 
ascertained, and all such other persons are therefore made parties Defendant to this 
action by the name and description of "UNKNOWN OWNERS'. 

Affiant further slates In addition to the persons designated by name herein, there 
are other persons who are Interested In this action and who have or claim some right, 
title, Interest or Men In, to or upon the real estate, or some part thereof, In this com- 
plaint described as persons or tenants In possession, that the name of each of such 
persons Interested In this action Is unknown to the Plaintiff, and upon diligent inquiry 
cannot be ascertained, and all such persons are, therefore, made parties Defendant 
to this action by the name and description of "UNKNOWN OWNERS". 

Affiant further states In addition to the persons designated by name herein, there 
are other persons who are Interested In this action and who have or claim some right, 
title, Interest or lien In, to or upon the real estate, or some part thereof, as described 
In said complaint; that the name of each of such other persons interested in this action 
Is unknown to the Plaintiff, and upon diligent inquiry cannot be ascertained, and all 
such persons are, therefore, made parties Defendant to this action by the name and 
description of "UNKNOWN OWNERS*. 

Affiant further states that In addition to the persons designated by name in the 
complaint, there are other persons who have or claim to have an Interest In the mort- 
gaged real estate which is not disclosed of record by recorded notice or proceeding 
which would give constructive notice and who are more fully defined In Sec. 15-1 210 
of the Illinois Mortgage Foreclosure Law (735 ILCS 5/15-1101 et seq.). The name or 
names of these other persons are unknown to the Plaintiff and to this deponent and 
all such other persons are made parties Defendant to this action by the name and 
description of "NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS". 
And, further. Affiant sayelh naught. 

/5/Kenneth Rosenborg 
Subscribed andewomto 
before me this 21 si day of October, 1998. 
- is/ Anita B. Dordek 
Kenneth R. Roseburg 
Dordek, Rosenborg & Associates, P.C. 
8424 Skokle Blvd. 
Skokie, Illinois 60077 
Tel: 647-676-9555 
FAX: 847-676-2676 
Arty. No. 16635 

1098E-2228-MN 

November 6, 1998 

November 13, 1898 

November 20. 1998 

November 27, 1998 



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C1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



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'«*-•■„. 



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COUNTY 



November 6, J99b 









RANCH £ S 




Presents Their 1 4th 










vember 6, 7, & 











r Prizes 



agister T< 









%Cll El mm 1^^%1'E 



Need Not Be Present To Win - Must Be l8Yrs.Or Older 










Horses & Ponies 



ASK ABOUT OUR 6 MONTH GUARANTEE 

For Our Famous $1 

Values Worth Up To $150.00 
Come See Us At 

29550 W. Roberts Rd. 
Island Lake. IL 

Or Call Us At 

(847) 526-8066 
479-1844 

HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 9-8, Sat., Sun. 9-5 





£!• I- ■ ' . ■ . ..■■■.. 

■■■.-, "■.- '■ ."■' : ..-■.- ■ . '.-'■ " ■; '. " '■". ■-■-■-■- :;■ 






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Novembers, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



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Lost & Found . .', ... . . .\ ,115 

rrcc . ■ i m,m ■ • ■ •'«-».. ..*.,•*■•■••« .120 

Personals .125 

Auction* . .;„ ..;... . .130 

Business Personals ■//-.. V • . . . .135 

Financial .;,. ... ,,;. . i :,^... i';r,'r,\;''.?ji^., m .X\.s?.i4ti 



. ■ . -' 









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Wm :■' - : ■*■■■■ , 5fe^#^^^r^n^M^^^?^ 

Kenosha 
County 



TWnLaka* snwwLtiap^^j^Brt,^ 



Help Wanted Part-Time . 
Help Wanted Full-Time 
Employment Agencies 
Bus) less Opportunities 
Situations Wanted . . . - 

Child Care ..... 

School/Instruction 



.219 

.220 
.221 

,.225 
.228 
.240 

,.250 




• jss&i 



Antiques 301 

Appliances 304 

Barter/Trade 308 

Bazaars/Crafts 310 

Building Materials 314 

Business/Office Equipment 318 

Electronics/Computers 320 

Farm Guide 324 

Firewood - .328 

Garage/Rummage Sales 330 

Good Things To Eat f 334 

Horses &Tack 338 

Household Goods/Fumlture 340 

Jewelry .344 

Lawn/Garden 348 

Clothing .,. 349 

Miscellaneous 350 

Medical Equip/Supplies 354 

Musical Instruments . . , .358 

Pets & Supplies 360 

Restaurant Equipment -364 

Tools & Machinery 368 

Wanted To Buy 370 



Homes For Sale -500 

Homes For Rent .--■•. ; . . .504 

Homes Wanted 508 

Homes Builders . • .510 

Condo/Town Homes 514 

Mobile Homes 518 

Apartments For Rent 520 

Apartments Wanted 524 

Apl/Homes To Share 528 

. Rooms For Rem 530 

^Buildings 533 

;- 'Business Property For Sale 534 

. Business Property For Rent , . . . ,538 

'.'Investment Property ....,«. .540 

„ Mortgage Services ^ . . .544 

f^arrfct} . , ■......„ 548 

Vacant Lois/Acreage : . ? . .^ > r.1560 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals .?•» 564 

Out Of Area Property .568 

Cemetery Lots 570 

Real Estate Wanted 574 

Real Estat e Misc . .578 



Recreational Vehicles 704 

Snowmobiles/ ATVs 708 

Bouts/Motors/Fic. . . 710 

Camping .... .714 

Travel/Vacation .: . , 7|g 

Sports Equipment .720 

Airplanes , .724 

Cars For Sale 804 

Rental/leases , 808 

Clu&sic/ Antique Cars 810 

Services & Parts , 814 

Car Loans/Insurance 818 

Vans 824 

l-'uur Wheel Drivc/Jccp.s 828 

Trucks/Trailers 834 

Heavy Equipment ....... 838 

Motorcycles 844 

Wanted To Buy 848 



Appliances Repair S03 

Blacktop S06 

Builders . S09 

Carpentry SI2 

Carpet Cleaning SIS 

Concrete/Cement > S18 

Dry Wall . S21 

Kducatiwi/lnstrucliaii ... .S24 

Rlcclrical : ..... . S27 

Firewood S30 

Handyman ( S33 

Healing/Air Conditioning .... . . S36 

Housekeeping . . .S39 

Landscaping . . S42 

Laundry/Cleaning S45 

Legal Services . ... . .... S48 

Medical Services . . S5 1 

Moving/Storage , , , S54 

Painting Decorating 557 

Paralegal/Typing Services .SfiO 

Plumbing S63 

Pools -S66 

Pressure Washing S69 

Professional Services S72 

Radio/TV Repair S75 

Remodeling T .$78 

Resumes ..- SB I 

Roofing/Siding S84 

Storage • ■ S87 

Tax Service , ■ ■ ■ -590 

Trees/Plants . ., ., --. S93 

Wedding S96 

Miscellaneous 599 




McBenry 



Kenosha 



Sj^non 
.YVadfworift 

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Gumee \\ . ... \ 

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PLACE A 




PHOJME (847)223-8161 



□ y Lakeland Newspapers 

ii«Aii RaBox268 " 

M AIL : Grayslake, IL 60030 ■ 



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Cook County 



Buffalo Grew 



Northbrook k* 



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Lakeland Newspapers* Classifieds Appear In 11 Newspapers! 

Antloch News • Rmmd Lake News • Lake Villa Record 

Mundelein News • Wadsworth News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press • Lmdenhurst News 

Wauconda Leader • Libertyville News 



30 S. Whitney St. 
PERSON GrrjysIakB^ 



■r-:-;:: 




BY 
FAX (847)223-2691 






Direct Line, -,..,,. .TVies. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party...Wed. 10am 
HOURS 

8am-8pm Mon.-Thurs. 

8am-5pm /..FridayJ 





€J?gSff*t#if Newspapers 



110 



Notices 



110 


Notices ! 



125 


Personals 



X £* &3 


Personals , 



125 



Personals 



ERRORS: 

Wa strive to eliminate errors, 

but If one should occur, 

please report it immediately 

as we can be responsible tor 

the first two (2) weeks only. 

NO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE. UNLESS THEY 

^AFFECT THE material 

VALUE OF AN AD 



8mm & 16mm FILMS 

Professionally transferred to 

VHS video. 

Call Jim (847) 973-1022. 



IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, If 

you are having a Garage 

Sato or l( you have a 

houM to sell or apartment 

to rant. 

Call Lisa bafore 10am 

Wednesday- to ptaca 

your ad here. 

(647) 223-8161 

-*. aati34p. 

WRrTE FOR YOUI 

*X-Mas Cards 

* Wedding Invitations 

'Shower/Party Invitations. 

'Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rates. 

Call (BIG) 363-5330. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 
ADVERTISERS 

It you have placed classified 
advertising with Ihe Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another nrm request- 
ing payment for Ihls advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, all pay- 
ments Tor your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as Invoiced 
and directed 1ol 

Lakeland Newspapers 

PO Box 268 

30 B. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030-0208 



1IEAJLTHY WOMEN 

F3IBlEin>IB© 
$3500.00 Compensation 

Healthy women, age 20-33. 

needed to serve as anunymoii: 

egg donors. Donors will be 

required In take medication. 

bluod screening and undergo 

nup.or sufgicaUproccdure. We 

are inletestcd in all ethnic 

backgrounds. Multiple locations 

available. If interested cai] 

ARK m-317^il^ 

Stnvtis tnquirtrx Only 



115 



Lost & Found 



CLUB SINCERE 

A local singles club in the 

Northwest Suburbs. 

We get together at a 

neighborhood bar. 

No cover charge. 

No gimmicks. 

Join now. 
Ladies join tree. 
(647) 516-8644. 

DARNELL 21 
BOOK LOVER SERVICES 

Books at bargain prices 

•Unique Book Gift Baskets 

*Shut-!n Reader Service 

" Bargain Book Fairs & Much 

More. Free list of services and 

Iree book Inlormation. 

Call (647)838-3221. 

FREE BUS RIDE 
TO POTAWATOMI 

BINGO. 
Monday-Tuesday- 
Thursday. 
Pick-up 4:30pm at 
Hampton Inn, Gurnee. 
Rldo 10 times and get a 
free package of specials. 
Hollywood Casino, 
November 3rd., 
4:i5pm., pay $15 and get 
$15 back, 2-sesslons. 
Coll for Information 
(B47) 631-1094. 

HYPNOSIS BY DAVID 

The Holistic Approach to 
Good Health. 

Stop Smoking 
Lose Weight and More. 
FREE CONSULTATION. 

(847)816-4951. 



$500 REWARD LEADING 

TO LOSTDOG. Doberman. «b- 
male. Lost near Rt. 173 & 45 
on 9/30/9.8. (B47) 625-9345, 
pager (847) 992-0277. 

DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost ArticlB? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8181. 




Free 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 

FREE PICK-UP SERVICE. 

I will haul away your unwanted 
row boat, canoe, outboard 
motors, or fishing gear FREE. 
Call (847) 566-2819 after 
5:30pm. 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF, THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FHEE or GIVEAWAY Ad in Ihe 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGEI (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines; 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161, ext.140. 



t ia H a M* i * aaa>aiaJai**** » a**iaa>* 

A BABY TO LOVE 

We're Patty and Tom, 

partners in marriage and the 

best of friends. A baby would 

fulfill our greatest dream. We 

value education, have 

supportive families, 

financial security, and lots ot 

energy and love. 

We'll gladly help you, tool 

CALL PATTY& TOM 

1 -688-200-2727. 

HKH1II I II I IUHIMU1II 

«,* «« «**»« *. »«. « *«.«»*;« 

*****PSYCHIC 

READINGS 

BY 

SILVANA 

'Curious about your 

future? 

*ln Love? 

'Confused? 

Psychic, Palm & Tarot 

Cards. 

15yrs. Experience. 

Remember, I am a true 

Psychic born with power, 

and I will help you! 

If you are unhappy, 

discouraged, or In 

distress, 1 cart help you. 

A few minutes of 

consultation will have 

your mind at ease. 

All Readings are Private & 

Confidential. 

Housecalls Available. 

Special 50% off all 

readings. 

Two locations. 

(847) 550-6476 

(847) 540-4264. 

i«at*a>* a >** a ia>**a*ar*M»ar** aM 

100 PEOPLE NEEDEDI 

WE PAY YOU 

TO LOSE WEIGHTI 

Dr. Recommended I 

Guaranteed! 

(847) 497-9690. 

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

A BEAUTIFUL 

DREAM...ADOPTIONI Your 
dream of giving your baby a 
wonderful family life and a 
great future Is possible. We're 
a happily married, financially 
secure professional couple 
eager to adopt a baby. Let's 
talk. CALL RUTH AND FRED 
1-800-320-9666 anytime. 

LOSE WEIGHT 

IN TIME FOR 

THE HOLIDAYS 

Improve your 

health and energy 

GUARANTEED!! 

( Free Samples/with orders). 

Call Kathy...(647) 395-7653. 

LOSE WEIGHT FAST! 
Safely and Nutritiously with 
our 100% natural program. Se 
Habla Espanol. (414) 
653-9677, outside Wisconsin 
1-B88-603-9727. 



ADOPTION 
IS AN OPTION 

Dear Special Birthmother. 

We're Brad and Lisa, 

a stay-at-home mom and very 

devoted lather. We would love 

to give your precious child a 

wonderful life, full of 

opportunities, and lots of love. 

We know this is a very 

difficult, 

important decision for you. 

Let's talk and plan your child's 

future together. 

Medical, legal, counseling 

and court approved 

living expenses paid. 

Confidential. 

Please call our attorney at 

(708) 957-6330. 

AN ADOPTION MINI-LET- 
TER We are a loving couple 
hoping to adopt. Mary will be a 
full-time mom & Greg will be 
an involved & devoted dad. 
We will share story telling, 
laughter, lamily activities and 
all of our love. You will never 
have to worry about your 
child's future. To find out 
more, call our lawyer, SARA, 
at (773) 509-0099 or (877) 
509-0099 (toil free). 

BURN YOUR UNWANTED 
FAT BEFORE THE HOLI- 
DAYS. 100% guaranteed. 
(847) 546-2296. Se Habta Es- 
panol. 

LOOK GREAT! 
LOSE WEIGHT! 
MAKE MONEYI 
(847) 640-9689. 

PLEASE HELP US 
ADOPT! Musical mom, athle- 
tic dad, married 1 1 years, lov- 
ing parents to 2-adopted pre- 
schoolers hoping to adopt 
your precious baby. We live in 
an activity-filled comfortable 
home with 2 lovable mutts in a 
close-knit neighborhood full o( 
children (many adopted). Med- 
ical, legal, counseling and 
court approved living expens- 
es paid. Confidential Please 
call our attorney at (70B) 957- 
£833. 

WANTED 
96 SERIOUS PEOPLE 

To Lose Weight. 

100% Natural. 

Or. Recommended. 

Limited time. 
Call (847) 526-4271. 

WAXING OR TWEEZING? 

Try electrolysis 

(permanent hair removal) 

and permanent cosmetic 

make-up, 

(eye brows, eye and lipline), 

Sherry (847) 249-7446. 

PLUS SCESl 

WOMEN'S LINGERIE! 

CALL FOR FREE 

CATALOG. 
(647> 634-1307. 



WEIGHT LOSS GUAR- 
ANTEED! Lose'- weight, feel 
great for the holidays. Stop rtl- 
blers, Dingers, emotional eat- 
ers. Only $16.95 'Select* Phar- 
maceutical 1-800-258-0989. 
Phone check, C.O.D., Credit 
Cards. www.select- 

welghtloss.com (SCA Net- 
work). 

WHY BE FAT? Amazing new 
weight loss system developed 
by top fitness specialist. Send 
$1 5.95 plus $3.00 shipping to: 
Body Complete. 2066 Rich- 
mond Rd., Suite 434. McHen- 
ry, Hi. 60050. 



140 



Financial 



BANKRUPTCY $78+. 

STOPS garnishments. Guar- 
anteed valid since 1991. Di- 
vorce $99+ Low caost Debt 
Reduction and Foreclosure. 
Avoidance services available 
wilhout bankruptcy. Fresh- 
Start 688-395-8030 



CREDIT CARDS! NO secur- 
ity deposit. No Income reauire- 
ments. No credit check. 
GUARANTEED APPROVAL. 
Must be over 18 and have 
checking account. Call 1-800- 
250-8551. fSCA Network). 

ELIMINATE 

ALL YOUR DEBT 

(including Mortgage) 

In 5-7years with your 

CURRENT Income. 

For free brochure send 

SASE to: FDR Marketing, 

PO Box 733, 

Grayslake, IL 60030. 

msTmreAssj 





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WBBt 



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C18 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November 6, 1998 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 

Part-Time 



HOUSE CLEANING! 

Residential Houses! 

Daytime, flexible hours. 

Good salary. 

(647) 4B7-1J55. 



LOVE TO DECORATE? 
NEED TO ORGANIZE? 

New Party Planl 
Hiring consultants and 

booking shows. 

Great Christmas catalog. 

Call 1-B0O-639-4516. 



Pampered Chef 

needs more consultants 
to demonstrate quality 
kitchen tools at home 
kitchen shows. Average 
$15/520 hour commis- 
sion. No experience 
necessary. Call Linda 
(847) 249-1015 



Dietary Aide 



PT. Employee needed lor var- 
ious duties in kitchen Must 
be dependable & sellslarter 
Weekends required w/exira S 
Promolion opportunities avail 
able Must be able to read 
and write in English 
Apply in person a I 
CARE CENTRE OF 
WAUCONDA, 
1 76 Thomas Ct . Wauconda. 
IL <B47> 526-5551 



PART TIME 

SCHOOL 
CAFETERIA 

11:00-2:00 

Mon- Fri 

Call: 

847-587-2561 

x248 

8:00 - 1 1 :00 a.m. 



Golden Panda 
Restaurant 

is now hiring fur 
P/T Drivers 
for evenings 
starting at 5 25/hr + deliv- 
ery charge + tips 
Apply in person 

Golden Panda 

422 Lake St 
Anlioch. K- 

(847)838-1088 




S L©ve The Wall? 






^Here's a perfect part-time j©b!§ 

A .nfermotlon B«©th-Weekenda end Evenings § 

A Vou'/I outH ciotoiTOfi wiin oinntto™ ana wii rmxchorxlwi and &J 

£/ gin »fincafoi )l you're o frionciiy. worm person who onjoyl vj\ 

*V holpioo o'fHM people, IN j (i iho job tor youl Shop -a ■ ho llc« are k.% 

V! vwlcomo lo oppty and will to™ our moll t* icoonl programl > > 

I 



Vtjil In© moll monagoment office (noor Entry SJ lo complete 

on oppNconon during orrtce hours (Mf Sa-Sp) \ ' 

01 otII <M 7> 263- 7SOD, or<l 24 1 8 tor more informal Ion V 



CIRHEE 
UMIUS 






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^Kl^wNiSr#r&|xnlKpi|i? 
'|tefeiOUDAViCAspj ? * : :: . ' 

-. v. '. WrAKl looVirrq fox M«VIf £H(*r,niC ASSIStANT 

•swK A*;- ',nm:7 imiiih TUXpoiusy do Milan v^.- v' *»• 



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.tiNpoiuuty posnfaM.; 
'££, ^"'4*5. Ins ptk ;d*y o* noM*«£tfe"\" 
Typi 65WPM, W^WlNdow*, IMS' Woxk*^ 
DicfipkoN^Vplirt'-; will "iiuihV '. ":■ 
Liqttr to litAVy pkoms >. Good p*y [ ; 
.„ ColU^t SiudtrnV welcome I '■■'.*',,';-' 
CaII HydfiA CorporXtion 
27491 MihoN RoAd 
WauconoIa, J|- 6IB084 
^(847)5407000 or ; 1^ 



jj Get an "A" for Success!! 8 



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1 

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V 

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sTAKE THIS QUIZ! 



Yes No 

| H Do you like to earn money? 

J Do you like people? 

Il } ~ ) Do you have a pleasant phone voice 

I 1 1 I Do you want part-time work in a 

friendly environment? 

If you answered yes to any or all of the 

above, you can start earning dollars plus 

commission in LAKELAND'S Client 

Services Department. 

Please send letter of interest to: 



D 

.'d 
ii 

D 
D 

s 



n 

El 

ii 
i) 



rj 
1 



Attn: Maureen Combs 
c/o Lakeland Publishers 
P.O. Boot 268, Grayslake, DL 60030 jj 
or fax to !' 

(847) 223-2691 

SBaaMBBaoanaBBBBBBaBBBBOBBBBaaaBBBBBaBfl 



219 



Help Wauled 
Pan-Time 



Cam Extra Incomers 



Weekly paychecks 

working from home. 

Your choice of 

evenings and/or 

weekends. Scheduling 

appointments to pickup 

discarded household 

items for well known 

charitable organization. 

Minimum -i-fi hours a 

week. I'leasc call 

(630)515-5752 



■\ 



Part Time 

Denial Assistant 

20 - 30 hrs/wk 

MON • THUR 

Our ORTHODONTIC 

practice ts f eeking a very 

special person. We value 

good communication 
skills, Involvement, energy 

tt organizational 
skills. We stress personal 

development through 

conL ed., full participation 

with our team 

A a strong involvement 

with our patients. 

847-223-2876 

847-838-0105 



Amoco 

Retail Clerks Needed 
-flexible hours- 



Benefits include 

educational assistance, 

competitive wages & 

optional health coverage 

apply m person- 

ask for Dawn 

CiiriRT olid 12 & llwy 

I2()m Volo 

ask lor Panic 
Corner or Ri 22 

&Ul 12 
in Lake Zurich 



Graphic Artist 

WANTED 

To work in a creative 

atmosphere designing 

display ads Candidates 

must Know QuarkXPress 

lor Macintosh Experience 

Hi Photoshop. Illuslrator. 

and Freehand helplul. 

but will (rain Must have 

good typing skills 

Please mail resume and 

salary history to 

Lakeland Newspapers 
Attn: Ad Services 

Supervisor 

30 S.Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 




219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



EAcutti' 

FUN WITH CHILDREN 

Stroking toachors for a 

computer enrichment 

program. Will train. 

6-10 hrs/wk. 

Good pay. 

847-259-8128 



Medical Reception 
Assistant 

Needed for Libertyvillo 

PodiBtry office. 14 

hours /week. Days 

(847} 549-7377 



•Housekeeping 

PART-TIME 

SXTURDAV A SUNDAY 

II an la 7 an 

rShifl Differential paid) 

HOt'SKKt;i-:i'ING exjwn<rni.r 

(nelrrrtfd Y«nr"lt jwrfnm 

i-lrunirig& •.jnilntinn 

pr4K-rdurc* in diirm fatitrlic* 

tii'Miinn adulu with irx-nm! 

diiahillhci. 

OliTlllS [NCUlDli 

Im marker pin | runcuiinv 

Ann.Y in pttttsON. 

Admin llldji . 

I.AMtlS HARM. 

I "M A Ki 1 7ft. 

l.lhrltyvitlr. II. it >■ r I 



& 

TVt*4tM<t* 

"2Ve cntt^ t*t£& ifUMi 



Wen"^j 



6429 $*4Hd/4vc. 



WANTED 

ACCOMPANIST for 

ADULT CHURCH 

CHOIR 

Musi he available for 
Wednesday evening 
rehearsals & one 
J.Sunday morning service 
[ per week, (f interested 
j please contact Barbara 
Klein at (847)336-2392 
i Gurnce Church 



< 



<W'oi\b-.d: } 

i [ 

4 iHirP'tktw- dntfl «:tilrv t 

4 k 

^ |M'.o|i1f. to in|ml iitfor- h 

i matiiio <i( IIk- Liikc. h 

1 (.ouidy ('.otirllvtiti.sc. r 

4 < '.oni) ii iter cxpcriitru'e. ( 

J Ix'lpfol. S)m.(uI. iu-.cti- J 

^ racy and reliability n I 



niiisl. ('.(iii)|H'.titivi>. 



I 

l«>iirly rote offc.re.d. J 
4 Hrxihlr. botirs. PIc^n*- > 
< mil Ic.ff Wv.U-.aU id > 



Part Time 



CIemcaI 



'fgGt&fbleSdntfiMc; hou/ts. 



-'i't'i 



■tt-1 



ill 

l r ,->.*i it 15 



Lahe'Land 



SWOWPLOW OWWtRS 

opsERiiroiHs; 



BOBCATOWNERS 
OPERATORS 

Top Pay! 

Plenty of work. Guaranteed hours. 

No wait for your money. Paid gas. 

(847) 272-1747 



219 


Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



Part Time 
General Office. 

Call Cathy at 
847-680-9200 



FIELD SERVICE REPS 

$7.0G7hour 

10-12 hours/week 

Are you looking lor prul-bmo wOrti 
with flexiMe schedules? Are you 
able to work independently? Do 

you have a rBliobto. insured auto' 

A national market rasoartn tirm 

seeks permanent, pan- lime 

omp'ovoos to collect product infor- 
malion trom local retail stores in 

Butlalo Grove area 
Call 847-384-0223 eoe 



( .i.nvlnn i liiirid III Ijiki 
/ink ll Jirvil lit limklllix lor n 

jHirt-llnit' IxHikkiijui. 

llli)iri>\lllliiUK 1 4 limit -> n 

ucck. We're limkln^ tor 

wilTn-inli' wllh liiiiuu-Ial 

CXtiericnCf llmt kmms 

(Jl ill kin mill IuimIi- i'<illl|Miti r 

lirn^rtmis It uili'ro u (ftfSfk 

U-iiniiT nntl ivuiilil triji^- 

uurkiiiK 111 <i illlllill iilln r. 

■ -ill Fell* MuiIk'u nl 

B47-S40-K2HO. 



Substitute School 
Bus Drirer 

| COL license rt quired. | 

Office hours 
8:30 AM. to 3:30 PJVL | 

BIG HOLLOW 
SCHOOL DISTRICT 

(847>587-2632| 



Are Your Hours 

This Good? 
IY1-F 7:30-3:30 



NO NIGHTS 
NO WEEKENDS 
NO HOLIDAYS 

nesidental Home Cleaning 

CAR REQUIRED. 

PAID MILEAGE 

Dependable people apply in 
person Danwlpm 

merry makte 

500 N Seymour 

Mundelein 
847-970-5380 J 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



AVON PHODUCTS- 

START a homebased busi- 
ness. Work flexible hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call 
Toll Free (BBS) 561 -AVON. 

BE YOUR OWN BOSS11 

Need extra cash? 

Join THE HOMEMAKER'S 

IDEA COMPANY. 

Be the first In your 

neighborhood to sign up as a 

consultant for our great party 

plan. Flexible hours and lots ol 

fun. wonderful products 

Call today for info. 

1-800 639-4516. 



DRIVER BUD MEYER 
Truck Lines Relrigeraled Haul- 
ing "Si. 000 sign -on bonus for 
experienced company drivers 
"Solo drivers start up to 33c 
solos drivers and contractors 
CALL TOLL FREE 877-283 
6393 GRADUATE STUDENTS 
1-a00-33B-642B. 

DRIVERS - O/O'S DEDI- 
CATED LANES, Short & 
Long Haul For Van & Fialbed 
1 00% Owner Operator Co NO 
Forced Dispatch, Malone 
Freight Lines 800-366-6361. 

DRIVEHS COMPANY AND 
OWNER OPERATORS Van 

opportunities *S4i,000/yr 
average 'Homo weekends 
'Assigned lalo model equip- 
moni 'Free medical *No NY 
city 'Class "A" w/Haz. Call 800- 
788-7357 LANDAIR TRANS- 
PORT. INC. 

DRIVERS WANTED: PRO- 
FESSIONAL OTR (1 yr. exp.) 
T/T DRIVERS. ONLY THE 
HIGHLY MOTIVATED, SAFE- 
TY ORIENTED NEED APPLY. 
WE OFFER: BIG TRUCKS - 
BIG HOODS. BIG MILEAGE • 
BIG BUCKS AND MOREI 
FOR MORE INFO ON OUR 46 
STATE OPERATION: CALL 
ELITE EXPRESS AT: (800) 
441-431B 



220 



fldp Wanted 
FuUTime 



220 



Help Wonted 
Fdl-Tlmc 



DRIVERS: ATTENTION 

ALL flatbed drivers. It's about 
time you learn about Builders 
Transportation & our $1000 
guaranteed Christmas bonus. 
Don'i hesitate to call 1-800- 
238-6803. Applications must 
have tyr. fialbed exp. w/Class 
ACDL 

DRIVERS: HEARTLAND 
EXPRESS offers starting pay 
up lo 37c/mile. Late modal, as- 
signed convenlionals. excel- 
lent milos, time homo every 7- 
10 days in most areas and 
more. Experienced drivers 1- 
87-PRODRIVE. Owner opera- 
tors ask about 88t/mlle. Call 1 - 
8-PROFIT-PRO. E.O.E. 

EARN $20 PER HOUR 
AVO. Immediate openings. 
Deliver applications locally. No 
experience necessary. Easy 
work, No sales. 1-800-373- 
3696 Ext. 6851. (SCA Nel- 
wprk). , 

EASY WORK! 

NO EXPERIENCE 

S500-S 1,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free information send 

sell-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services. Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Ingleside, 111 60041. 



CRAFT SHOWS 
GALORE! 



PACE C-30 



FALCON CABLE TV Is ac- 
cepting applications for Load 
Technicians and Technician in 
South Central Illinois. Experi- 
ence required. Send resume 
to: 11 Clearing Ave., Taylor- 
ville. III. 62568. E.O.E 

GET PAID S15-S30 per 
hour processing Insurance 
claims for local doctors office. 
Complete training provided. 
Computer and modern re- 
quired. Call 800/942-8141 
EXT. 62. 

HOME TYPISTS. PC usore 
needed, $45,000 Income po- 
tential. Call 1-800-513-4343. 
Ext, B-7266 (SCA Network). 

MEDICAL BILLING. NA- 
TIONWIDE Company soak- 
ing tillers. PC required, no ex- 
perience necessary. Potential 
earnings of $31,500+. Invest- 
ment required. Call 000-624- 
1478. 

OTR CLASS A Drivers: We 
pay you for your best. Come 
earn what you deserve. Up to 
35e/mlle plus bonus and bene- 
fits. Easy no $ down lease pur- 
chase program available. Call 
600-843-8308 or 3384. 

PET CAREI ENERGETIC 

dependable person, various 
duties involving pets. Musi be 
flexible and available 7 
days/week Including wee- 
kends and holidays. Call only 
between 10am-5pm. Monday- 
Friday Shel-Ray Pel Shale! 
(4141857-2163 



DISPATCHERS 



Aldridge Electric Is looking for extremely flexible, hard 
working individuals with data entry skills to dispatch 
traffic signal maintenance calls covering a five-county 
area. We have openings for all shifts (including week- 
ends and holidays). In return, we oiler good working 
conditions, friendly, helpful co-workers and a very com- 
petitive rate of pay. Please either send resume with 
salary history to 28572 N. Bradley Road, Liber tyvilte, 
IL 60048, Attn: DR, or Fax lo (847) 680-9738, or 
complete application form between hrs. 
of 7:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. 







How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Dear...Scarch 

My husband has been employed for almost two years. He 
cannot find any positions in his field (accounting). He is 42 
years old and cannot enter into anuthcr field without experi- 
ence. We have a preschool child who requires daycare. What 
careers can you suggest which would command a salary 
high enough to cover this expense ($5,200 a year)? I low can 
he compete in other fields when lie is unsuccessful in his 
own with many years of experience? Fortunately, I am work- 
ing full time. We have no family members able to care for 
our preschool child. Sincerely, A.K.-Mordin Grove 



DearA.K. 

I wns surprised in see that you had not included a copy of 
your husuand's resume. While you state thai your husband 
has hriii employed for almost two years, the circumstances 
surrounding his unemployment have been omitted. Yon 
mention Hint his field is accounting yel (uriliet failed to 
mention the type of accounting your husband is involved 
with. What is his forie?...CI'A... Payroll Coordinalor...Senior 
Cost Analyst...? Without proper information, the possibili- 
ties are ton numerous for me to assume die avenue for him 
to take. Your husband needs to sit down and evaluate what 
facets of acTounling he is capable of handling and is willing 
to pursue eitlu-r its a step up or a step hack. I will say howev- 
er, Jelling us assume lhal your husband was the Controller 
of a small manufacturing facility, he may wish to pursue a 
position in Cost Management for a mid to large si/.e corpo- 
ration. It may also he that he needs to take a step back in 
tirdet to gel two steps ahead. As for your situation with child 
tare, check om larger corporations offering child care as an 
employment benefit. Another aliernative is lo find a neigh- 
bor or friend that may be willing to watch your child in llie 
a.m. in Hade for watching theirs in the p.m. If your husband 
is interested, he may wish lo contact me for further infor- 
mation which 1 would be pleased to* provide. Good luck. 

Dear...Search 

I have been called lo serve jury duty for the first time, I am 
unaware as to how long this will last bul is my employer 
required to pay me for my time offfS.I-". - l.iheityvtlk- 

Dear S.F. 

Most companies recognize jury duty as a civic obligation. 
The majority of companies pay (heir employees the differ- 
ence between jury duly pay and their own earnings. Same 
goes for employees in reserve training and the National 
Guard. As citizens there are certain things we must do for 
our communities and our country. The majority of compa- 
nies recognize the "good citizen" participation and support 
these situations. 



Letters can be scnl to Nancy Sakol 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 
P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 



■ 



'.V^*'v-' 



Novembers, 1998 



.. ■ ■ . - - . ■ 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 9 



220 



Help Wanletl 
fiill-TIme * 



220 



Help Warned 
.Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
>' FuMIme : 



: - \'- • ' . 



220 



Help Wanted: 



AREA 

REPRESENTATIVES 

WANTED 

International Student 
Exchange provides train- 
ing, travel opportunities 

and supplemental 

Income for placement 

and supervision of 

exchange students, their 

host families and 
schools. BONUS for pre- 
vious experience as an 
Area Representative 
Send Resume to: 
1SE9215GarrRd, 
Berrien Springs, 
Ml 49103 
FAX (616) 471-5713 
or E-Mail: 
Kayter@aol.com 



BURGER 

KING 

IS NOW HIEING I 

AttlttMut Iflansgen 

for Fox Lake, McHcnry, 
Waukegan, Gumce, 

Graysiake and 
Barrington locations. 
All positions include 
full benefits & advance- 
ment opportunities. 
Experience helpful but 
not required. 

Tat more Infomwllon e»B John at 

1 -81 5-356-9779 ext 116 

EOE 



w 



IET3 f$ _ Finance 



J 



Local HVAC-r. 
■;'; wholesaler looking 
. for reliable 'Team 
Members." We are 
looking for someone 
to Join our team in a 
warehouse/driver 
position. We can offer 
a competitive wage, 
excellent Insurance 
package and a profit 
sharing program. If 
you want a position 
that Is challenging, but 
also have fun doing it, 
then stop In and let's 
talk. Applications are 
being taken at 
CONTROL*!) 
ENGINEERING SUPPLY 
ZA915 N. Derby Or. 1 
Late Haft, IL 60044 



Ji tlnandat mhsLL of among j 

waU'xUrgeis auwmfc ax't 

hoi rnlry fcvr I carter epps. 

Drgrred btJIvt. Nora bwttf. PW] 

fix rrtitme to: 

m-wsm. 



$$$ EXTRA $$$ 
CASH FOR THE 

HOLIDAYS 

Telemarketing 

$8-$9/lir. 

Full - time days or 

early evenings. 

Call today 

549-0076 



aperior 

Personnel 




PROJECT ASSISTANT 



Duties wilt include bid preparation, various support 

tasks for all Project Managers, data entry on 

AS/400 and PC, creating and updating 

spreadsheets, correspondence and filing. Successful 

candidate will be part of a support team. Must be able 

to work welt with both field and office personnel under 

pressure of deadlines. Please either send resume with 

salary history (including level of proficiency in Microsoft 

Word, Excel and Access) to Aldridge Electric, Inc., 

2B572 N. Bradley Road, Llbertyville, IL 60048, Attn: PA. 

or Fax to (847) 680-9738. EOE 



REPORTER 

Great Lakes Bulletin has an opening on its 
expanding editorial staff. Experience pre- 
ferred with background in photography help- 
ful. Will handle a variety of assignments. Will 
be working with a varied schedule and be 
able to work under deadline situations. For 
interview appointment fax resume to: 

Bill Schroeder, Jr. 

General Manager at 

(847) 223-8810 



I4rl-n>- 



We'll take your career 
a brand new direction. 




H you wan! more out ol your coroer, H's time to learn mote about PNC Morlcpge. 
ae ol ihe biggest names in (he financial services business. Righi now wo nm 
uxpenef icing liemendous growth due to acquisitions ano" smart slrasegic 
fanning and iiave entry-level to ex|X>noncoci positions nvnilnbln 
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR 



A Career Change? 

On-The-Job Training? 

Company Stability? 

An Increase in Salary? 



Then, check out PNC Mortgage. We are interested in any 
individual with the following skills or background. 



SKILLS: 



• PC -BOOKKEEPING • CASH HANDLING 
• ACCOUNTING • ACCOUNTS PAYABLE • GENERAL OFFICE 



BACKGROUND: 

• MORTGAGE COMPANY • FINANCIAL INSTITUTION •RETAIL 
• FORECLOSURE • CUSTOMER SERVICE 

WE OFFER 

• COMPETITIVE SALARIES • CAREER TRAINING 
• ADVANCEMENT • BENEFITS • TUITION REIMBURSEMENT 



Find out how PNC can mako a difference in your life. Send a rositne lo PNC Mortgage 
Dent. DN/CS. 75 N Fairway. Vernon Hills. IL 60061 Or FAX: [8A 7) W9-256H. 
ftjLrt Q)fxyiijr^Alftrwl^acticxi€njgfrEeerrpb^r 

PNCMOETGAGE 



220 



Help Wanted 
: FuII-TTme 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuMlmer. 



Want to earn up to $200 per week and be 

your own boss? The Dally Herald Is 
looking for adult, independent 
. personnel for newspaper delivery in the M 
Lake County area. 2-3 hour routes ' 

available between the hours 
of 2am & 6am, Monday thru Friday; 
' 2am -7am, Saturdays, Sundays, 
and Holidays. 

For more Information call... 
(847) 427-4333 



SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names listed below for further information. 

Adlai E. Stevenson High School District 0125 
Two Stevenson Drive, Lincolnshire, IL60069 

Contact: Personnel ; .. (847)634^000 

Antloch Community High School District #117 
1 133 Main SL, AnUoch, IL 6000Z 

Contact: Marie x-224 <847) 395-1421 

Antloch Elementary School District #34 
800 N. Main. Anlioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Kathy (847) 395-0712 

Aptakisic - Tripp School District #102 
123! Weiland Rd, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak (847) 634-5338 

Big Hollow School District 038 
34699 N. Ilwy 12, Ingleside, IL 60041 

Contact: Ms. Buchner (847) 587-6800 

Deerileld School District #109 
517 Decrfield Rd. Deerficld, tL 60015 

Contact: Phyllis x-222 (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Lake Road. Anlioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Pal Reed or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Graysiake School District #46 
450 N. Barron Blvd., Graysiake. IL 60030 

Contact: Jan Fabry x-1100 (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

Contact: Shari Keena. (847) 367-3279 

Lake Bluff School District 065 

121 E. Sheridan Place, Lake Bluff, IL 60044 

Contact. Jean Amundson x-14 . . (847) 234-9400 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Dccrpath, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie (847) 604-7423 

Lake Forest High School District 0115 
1285 North McKinley Road, Lake Forest. IL 60045 

Contact: Wendy Antrim x- 1 18 (847) 234-3600 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinley, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kathy (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School Dist. 0187 
2000 Lewis Ave., North Chicago. IL 60064 

Contact: Mona Armstrong (847) 689-8150 

Northern Suburban Special Education District 
760 Red Oak Lane. Highland Park, IL 60035 

Contact: Bill Charts (847) 831-5100 

Round Lake Area Schools 

3I6S. Rosedale Court, Round Lake, IL 60073 

Contact: Maureen x-3010 (847) 546-5522 

Spring Grove School District # 1 1 ( 

2018 Main Si., Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Contact. Jill (815) 675-2342 

Wauconda School District 01 18 
555 N. Main, Wauconda, IL 60084 

Contact: Kathy x-104 (847) 526-7690 

Waukegan Public Schools District 060 
1201 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan, IL 60085 

Contact: Personnel (847) 360-5404 

Wllmctte Public Schools 
615 Locust Rd., Wilmelte. IL 6OO9I 

Contad: Susan Goodnow (847) 256-2450 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, IL 60030 

Contact: Michelle (847) 856-3605 

Young At Heart Center 

610 Peterson Rd., Libertyville, 1L60048 

Contact: Lisa or Leslie (847) 367-61 10 



220 



Help Wanted 
,'FuMIaie :I 



W h 



! '■■:-•'■ ffitaiKK©'- 

■■ immtftlaU i 

bo»»d«f , 
f rucking compory I 

Ooorntoi 

tc»L*3m;«*jpL 

vwrf. w» offer 'Hetm'fi 
»Comppoy.*H«otJtt 

1 nc« 'Profit »hoj ».-■'' 
>WbOou**J00i£ 

jtroDi cod I 

.0*600.870*048' 



• - ■ 



We are Cancer Treatment 
Canters of America, a nation- 
ally recognized leader In innova- 
tive cancer care. Willi our beauti- 
ful 85 bed stata-of-iho-art hospi- 
tal, wo encompass the latest 
technological advancements as 
an Oncology provider. We have 
been serving Lake County for 
over SO years and, you can 
become a part our outstanding 
team: 

COLLECTIONS - Fult-Ttme 
1-2 years experience with health- 
care collectors with knowledge of 
cash eppficatlon. Strong written 
and verbal skills end PC/data 
entry knowledge required 
BILLING - Part-Time 
24 hours per week. Includes 
excellent benefits. Knowledge of 
hospital billing preferred, will Iraki 
right individual wtth other Dining 
experience. Excellent written and 
verbal comrrunlcalion skills and 
PC/data entry knowledge 
required. 

INSURANCE FOLLOW UP 
Flexible Day Hours -12 hours per 
week. Follow up with law offices 
and Insurance companies. 
Excellent organizational and 
rommunicalion rJOila. 
Along with the opportunity to be a 
part of an Innovative, progressive 
program, we oner en oulstandtfig 
benefit end compensation pack- 
age (depending on fun or part- 
time). For consideration, please 
fax, send or e-mail resume 
(INCLUDING SALAHY HISTO- 
VN) lo: Jeannle Ptlueger, Human 
Resources, 2520 Elisha Ave.. 
Bon, IL 60099. 
Fax M7-B72-6222 
fr-mi* 
pinna pludQtrairxinc -cm com 



Ik 

mEXTHEHT 



Equal Opportunity Employer 



Secretary 

Your Contributions 

Reflect In our Success! 

At Highland Park Hospital, we 

attribute our success to the 

dedication or each employee 

and we are proud to reward 

their expertise. As one of our 

Department Secretaries, you 

will make unmatched 

contributions to our excellence 

and you can enjoy all *t have 

to offer! 

DEPARTMENT 
SECRETARY 

FUIX TIME, DAYS 
MEDICAL STAFF ADMIN. 

Requites: 

•High School graduate 

• 1-2 years of secretarial 

experience 
•Excellent interpersonal and 
written/oral communication 
skills 
•Solid experience in 

WordPerfect 6.1 
•Ability to be flexible and 
work in a fusi-paced 
environment 

We are situated in ■ beautiful 
North Shore suburb bordering 

Lake Michigan and wc can 
provide you with many cultural 
and recreational opportunities 

as well as excellent health 

benefits, including discounted 

health club membership. We 

are easily accessible (right off 

the expressway) and just 15 

minutes north of downtown 

Chicago! To be considered for 

(his integral position, forward 

resume to: 

Ham cite Cady, 

I IK Consultant 

HIGHLAND PARK 

HOSPITAL 

7 IS Glcnview Ave. 

Highland Park, IL 60035 

Pax: 847-480-3833 

E-mail: 

hcady@hphosp.org 

A Member of 

Northwestern Healthcare 

(eoe m/f/d/v) 



_ C20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November 6, 1998 



ft lldpWintcd 
,J Full-Tlmt 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Help Wanted 
FulJ-Tlmc 



JWEfiA 810R£ 



A/H CLERK 

Immed. opening tor exp. individual with great 

organizational skills. ASF exp. helpful. 

Hours Bam-5pm, M-F 

OEWBRA^ QFFUCfi 

Immed. opening for mature and responsible Individual. 

Join a winning team with excellent growth potential. 

Hours 8am-5pra, M-F. 

Call Vicky (847)223-8651. exl. 3088 or fax resume {847)223-5985 

flASHIKR/HECEPTION 
Large volume auto dealer in Grayslalce seeks dependable 
and mature individual. Hours 4pm-9pm, Sat hours vary. 
Call Toni (847)223-8651, ext. 3064. 



HclpWwIcd 
Full-It mc 



Help Warned 
Fii-Tlme 



[[dp Wanted 
FirSMlme 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 
REPRESENTATIVE 



Growing Lake County manufacturing co. has tin 
immedinlc cipcninc Tor full time Customer Service 

Rep Dutiet include customer service telephone 

conincl. vales/order entry, ami light duty telephone 

opernii>frterentn>niM Encellcni Mnrtiiu; wage nnd 

henerfo ,-ivaihhlc ha (lunlified candidate 

Apply in person nt 



Air-Drive, Inc. 

41170 Ryitn Riitid, Gtiract. II 



0(1(131. 




KIRKWOOD INDUSTRIES, INC. 

MUNDELEIN SUBSIDIARY 



Due to the expansion ol our business, a world loader of electromechani- 
cal components lor the nulonrolive. power loot, .ind homo appliance 
industries, has Iho tallowing opportunities available m our Mundoloin, IL 
division 

Shipping & Receiving Clerk 
First Shift 

The ideal candidate lor this position will possess good communi- 
calion skills, be a sell starter, and work wtih minimal supervision 
in a last paced environment. Experience required in various 
Shipptng/Recetving Junctions, including packing, order picking, 
scheduling, transportation, and dala entry. 

Machine Set-Up Operators 
Second and Third Shift 

Musi be mechanically inclined, able to work independently, 
assure all parts are ol acceptable quality, complete tool 
changeovers. be concerned with safely, maintain a constant Now 
ol production and property record production charts. 

KIRKWOOD INDUSTRIES, EMC. 

t>75 Tower Rd. 
Mundclcin, IL 600GO 
Fax: (847) 9*3-8521 

ISO !«><> I l Verified 

\Asii out website at: www.kirkwood-incl com 



iwaeaaennooaaeaBBeeHBBODeJBnaoaflosoaHOOBOB 

1 * Gurnee Mills Mall * 



JCPenneys 

OUTLET STORE 



JCPenney Outlet Is 
Now Hiring 

We Have Full and 

Part Time Positions 

available for: 



'CUSTOMER SERVICE SUPERVISORS 

'CUSTOMER ASSISTANTS 

'HEAP CUSTOMER ASST. 

'CASHIERS 

'STOCK PROCESSORS 



Please Apply in Person 

Monday thru Saturday 

10 A.M. -8 P.M. 

Wr> alter lieu trie schedules and associate discounts. 
Benelils lor regular associates include: *MiJical k Denial 
•Sul Cay !'l»u -I'aiJ Vavaturfii and llul'ilays »Mtrchawli« 
tJiunnm *Lik IrcjuiiLL- 'Saving! & IVulil Sharing Plan. 



-JCPenney» 

OUTLET STORE 



g 6100 Grand Avenue - Gurnee, Illinois g 
j Equal Opportunity Employer • M/FtD/V ft 

lieuEucsBsaQaBcsQQOBBaaBaacaBSBsyBSBasySBB 



LAmrfcaldrupky* 

ADMINISTRATIVE 
ASSISTANTS 

I PC iwtpt (lAaoufi Onci, YttwJ 

II Deaf], tirwo ffwtnl art •*»■* 

I coniTunCaBari and VrierpanKHUl 
Iblub fctJ prtttoui jdrr*-*»lr*M 
leipfrisjr* vi rirjurBd tiriifLir> 
f ruum w4 t* fle'juWJ oritnmd. 
j -*J3 (Srrjwii/Br| r rwUi r ntJcpefr 
trUri and iM u Iwv9t mitiplt 
I [nij ii om Br* Sont povfiona 

I wi hdudi wrd pnxnung tea* 
J -ty 0**0 r '" *-.-■■■ 

For mnvrl jlo txrOUqntan ml 

ynamunOB. 

WALGREENS 

»0 Warn As 

Deptna-AA 

DflcrVtl IL £00! b 

Van pur waft 1114 n 

and cwnptcfc * muma rx* Ino 
Ir.iijiw-.l [TOTcjm *-0 luppom 

1 drug- baa a^tptwi. 

EDE 



MAf £ff 0PFDflrUJ¥.//f5 
W/fHCfiflW7H 

i saccEsst 




Sem Auto Center 

and National Tire 

A Battery, 

«iih rrtdil Crxaliom in evrry 

RlJrUf .llrli.^Mllr'.lll j.(-j 

tliTiwgiuHji ilir n-iiioo, tur 
rt'itiH wr luvt: iHr In I km Ing 

■.■| pi,'.;:: !.-■ ,.■.. 11.1! | in 

.uwtjroundihrNW 
SufttirlH. 

d; Axsa ucit mneau 

(^CWHia ttir.*Z umao 
lV rVtErU r iTHT §ajMtxvt$ 

{^iircfuMa 

'COMKIIIfVt EARN. 

IrVCS 

-TUITION StlMBUflSt- 

Mttil 
-MlD\CAUDtNlAl 

PLAN 
-PAIDVACAIlONrtlCK 

DAR 
• IDIIKiriAN 



I ^r :il-'; H 1 ; --:l. IfiliKg 

J h rrcjuuprf Hmit jiiiiIv m 
) frrrwin j| the Sr.^rt Auln 
jtmlpi w NTil InulHw 
IritJinI vi "J fir |J« rt-lirmtrl 
■!ln)D*inM.ldiil 
J ISJ7J WS-IJ« 

"ll AiiJu C«">'(M- HHM0 A Y 



f*K 



1-877-STC-lOBS 



MEDICAL 




SUNRISE CARE 
& REHAB 

FOR ZION 
itEKi FTfl>T NURSES ON 
ALL SHIFTS WE OFFt* 
EXCELLENT BtNEfrTS.A 

H.EASANT WORKING 

ENVIRONMENT 

AND HIRE-ON BONUS 

PLEASE CONTACT STEVE 

LAUiR, RN DON AT 

(847) 746-3736 

TO ARRANGE A 
CONFIDENTIAL INTERVIEW 



11,110, 

$l5-$35 PER HOUH 
Easy medical baling. 

Full Training. 

PC/modem required. 

1 -800-259-6661 

ext 222 



I >,ufj«'9 



ottorto) He 



Occupational Health 

$24.50-$27.00/hr 



SIGN ON BONUS 



knUiiiij till plant scl lings 
tn Nortli western & for 
North Buburli* fravr 
proinlalnf* Per-DJcni 
apportunlUe^ nviUI. 

for UN *iUi mln. 
1-2 yr.s occupntlamit 

lu-.illli, En or fCU CUfp 

You inuM have the ability 

10 provide ftrsi -nit I untler 

cincfgcitcy condLUoi>», 

nnd have (he ntilltiy (0 

make sound cltnlaiL 

Judgements under slrefus- 

fui conditions- Computer 

skill;] required 

(e.o.e.) 

Fax resume to: 

O3O-6ft3-O&30 or 

call B0O-B64*a34fl 

10 schedule nn interview 



dri 



Olstton 

Heatth Services" 
Staffing 



ConcteTi Meo*Ccil Cen%r, ihe 
pTC3gres^vr in.i-Jfi --(( ii?aiih 
caie in Lahe Coufily, is look. 
tt»g loi qualiltrKl piolri$st0ni]l5 
in ihe (ollowing poailinns 

BADJOLOGY 

TRAWSCRIPTIONISTS 

{FuHnnfl Parl-Tvme vanable 

shills) 

TianstSinng feeorfleu rJicIa 
lion troitr me ladrotogisl. the 
quaE^ed canrjidaie win Iran 
senbe Ihe notes inia our com 
puior syslem Medic-al lermi 
norogy and eipeuenci? wilh 
WorrjPenecl required 

RADIOLOGY 

ASSISTANT 
|FuTl & ParMimei 

Vou'lf be resporiBiOle lar Iran* 
poriing patients, assisting in 
dark room and performing nie 
rcom duties Patleni 
ca\ietmQ(Hca\ sxpeiience 
strongty prelerred 

Beneliis avaiiaQie for elig&Je 
cantjidates Prease send 
rt-sumss to Linda Weirjrrtan 
Condell Medical Center! 
Human Resources Deer . 3U3 
Qeveland Ave , Libeflyville 
IL 60048 

(847) 362^2905 xS2JQ 
FAX(B47J9ia.B3t>9 
EOE 
irvww conoeil o-;g 



CbrKlf^Vfedicaianler 



Imrnediuto lull time 

position available in out 

Lake Zurich Intermediate 

Caie Facility will be 

responsibility lor 
planning, developing, 
implementing, and super- 
vising case 
management eclivilies 

(or MR/DD women. 

EtecliQioi's Degree and 

one year experience with 

MFVD0 population 

requited, 

Contucl < iaii Becker 

Mount 3aln! Joseph 

Lake Zurich 
(847) 438-5050 



CLASSROOM 
AIDE 

I Immediate Openings 

Monday-Friday, day 

I hours, entry level, will 

train. You train 

jmfudd Adulls in per 

] sonal care, prework 

communication & 

domestic skills. 

Contact 

Gall Becker 

Mount Saint 

Joseph, Lake 

Zurich 
(847) 438-5050 



CNA 



P.M.s& NIGHTS 

We nllei cKcelleril starting 
pyty %*l 00 pet hr * lop ben, 
■ '':■■ tcj - .1 :|t .1: .[■. RNs and 
l_PNi Hit- uyytconic lo apply 

d« CNA |XKHli"n» dt 

winfrtscd uitft Ova lenm it 

toorjuirj |^r new ployer^ FT 

H- IT . -.v. mi :.-'.. Apply in 

pnyan or CARE CFJVTRE 

OFWAUCONDA. 176 
Tlwni.15 O . WducontlA IL 

,8<i7j5ZGr.r»f.i 



********** 
********** 
■hjfliEh C.v«i_ 

CNA's 

h lama cases avaH^Ue 

NOW In 

Loho Couniy aiea 

Immodkalo 

postiinns availauic Ca^i 

Mor>uay - F»iday 

HURSEFINOERS 

B47-&6B-G0l)0 

«Kia' Oppo'iuni^ Orrnrfcive. 

********** 
********** 



PHARMACIST 

Looking lai 1 lo AG mi s 

*eik? 

Qiug EmpQilum is Hr an^wtii 

Wc r-ft»i- unrntqitte OpcntnOl 

tar Pf-ii ;«t.r to Full-Tlttie b,-.u 

beycml Enhie Mhwoukce 

CIED 
Wt pre otltcuig 

* CDhtPOITTVE WACE5 

• ADVANCEMErfT 
■BEMERn 

■ LXEAWPffOFtSSIQrtAL 
WtfRHNG EIWlRDNUErfT 

^ (:;>:■.; via -" ?i I ' ■ sirsc 0i U i 

■rtf 

QKU0 CMP0H1UH 

R^CtCHAJL OR^CES 

7435 taifson Rdm 

SI Lovl3. Missouri S3II3 

AMnc CM j tinslrf. 8 PTi 

FttE3tfl'gGB.25SS 

vjjttft eao-9^7-1530 lasej 



r DjRECT^ 
CARE 

DircL-t Cure Wtirkcrs 

Tur MrWDD women in 

residential selling. 

All shifts available. 

Full Time cir 

Pitrt Time. We are 

ciimrnittcif m quality 

rcsidenlial unre. 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 



Hosilhco rainilferrnaet 

Pharmacy 
Technician 

Full and f'art-timn 

CondtrM MiKKal Ceiftir. a ptogroi 
uvu liti-Atth emu n'Ovubf -n lav& 
Comnly Iih irTvntJU flit; i<$x.nmQ\ at 
Qui kft-pgnent rVMptral pnorrrmty tat 
bom FT & PI pAainiacY lochs 
Pnaimaey otppriomo « iiutJurft 
onrDllrnanl tn &ro-piiarrnncy eof- 

l£HJO Curriculum is prellrrT[KJ. rXJI «Q 

VIV wiling lo "-. tn-. --i.iir-n.-s :■.,.(, 

do! a j 

In riiiiim, vnt otlnr a campciibi.ip 
SOlary one! rKKHtlits r.|-V,]yj. ir fi 
ttlofliant wwk onv>ionmDn{ 
tntuiDbloc) applicant aio inviUKt id 
DOply in fWrjar linm flam-J-Mpm 
ui out Hum&n Huicii_r.TP5 Dupi , 
303 C i-L.li'.ril Avb in L.G01 :>-.-, In.. 
Fj» (017)316 8309 

EOE 

•vww Gondall ofQ 

O 

Cmddl Medical Cenlef 



MoniRhciiiro 

Wb -vr Cancei Tmairnonl 
CcnlPi* of AfTWJlci a ri.iii:,ii:iiy 
■ocogflirpc c-iXjoi iq innavjU'Vff 
Cnncur cflfu lAftm chc bauurilul ft 
Out) iinidol-mfl-nii rnjipiiaj, wa 
JLtrmumpBis IhD lDl|>-jI IcCIwoIhq,. 
C3I nBvnncerTKnis R5 flf* Orculng-y 
provoai BocaxrsooiaitiicrfrnTpfuHHl 

(JfCWiirL WW MCil 

W EPICAL ASSISTANTS 

Full .Tlriw 

Oin last jiacfic rnmtjy p'octicd pfc 

v >s looting lar oipermnqoti 

lOBTTT-pitiuT,! (TM«lC4l ftSSJTJlOfttJ 
MuAt tM t-ipflfitirtcofl' m ^iIcImio- 
nty FcullMil Comnij(itcaijty> aiiilHj 

Rfrdi uabie rrriik inntorv tot^iod 
Muw DC vary pqlioM rocusao 
Man - Frl, plui kpme Satumif 1 
AlLinrj wj| 1 Dig jppnrli^oiiL, i D H 
pert oJ an <niiovat»u. rjiopcrnivu 
piogrnni, wg oflfli Dfl aurlsltiniJing 
bOrtuPil nmd cc'npti"iaa.H£n xwcfc,- 
ng« Fot coraichjraitofv ;■-'*.'.'.=.*■ (3*. 
sand or o-mrjii tasuma liNCLUD- 
IWG SALARV HISTORY) 10 
Jflnnntrj Plluaofli. Humnfl 
i !.-.'■>. :rr.> : . 2520 1". ■:■,., Auv . 
^iOft, IL G0OH 
Fat 847'B72-622Z omaii 
|r-3fnijr gin ii^jc.-Q nrii t > : .;,-; Com 



mm£ ,T8E«li | i;r7M 'mif 
Equal Onpaflumrv Empl^vF 



Help Wanted 
Full-TIme 



CERAMIST] 

Immed Opening 
Mj&mxFLHtithbe: 

CAp y d. 

303-7J5-9985 



RESEARCH ASSOOATt 

Western truuportioon 

ImtlTUhS. MoilLLTTJJ SlMtC 

LlnlvcnJry<Ekiunun. Rcq'd; 
MS tn tngtrjcerinj, LIT Ik. k 
rtajiTd o/ [wogrei-tvrly 
rapomiue trAiuporUdcxi 
cxp tn FTS appliiUBom. Tiiln- 
tnalrteerina *J"o< Computer 
Syiicmv WTIwBrecentfy 

designamJ a Untventty 

T»iruportitk>n CenBer (3.6M 

In annual Funding! &- tceks 

cancTUiies wnoy4in co 

pdrttclpate in f^:- p*c«i 

reseArcb aclfvlriea at die rui'l 

t *n|'l level. Muil request 

complete appllcttrofi 

materials. Screening of 

applkjikmj will begin 

tl-l-9BimCt 

posJtion H ftlhsd. 

TradUlbetg. 

Wes-cern TranipooadDn 

Irurinjre. 

416CobtelghHtn 

MofiLina Suit 

U ntwerjity-BoiernJiri 

<'■-•: - -in ■ '-it S97 : 7 

406^99*-rXW6 

ADAyAA/IOAfeteian's pre* 



' STUDENT 
DEVELOPMENT 
SPECIALIST 

EducatiBnal Tatam Eourth 
Prognini 

Grnnl-FiintJpd H Part-Time 
& Fuft-TImo. 10 moii 
PESPOTMSaBUF FDR agisting 
piirvopuiits in graduDurg Trcirn 
oeconrJary echoo£a and motrie- 
ulating into pacG^eeandiu-v 
wlKCLiup-ia! programd Thu tipn- 
dnHn pm^tfoo support to i>ut 
bom *n cha prngram fog psr- 
Eanol development, carper, 
mudy Akina, na.\ 
A aACHELLfi'S DEO^C wU< a 
Studqr.L ClGvtilupmctrit ccnian- 
tro'inn In g Ccuntiii irvi 
Studcfiil Dc*m!e pntDnL 5qcilhI< 
Work. Pavcholngy, otc ) and 1 
ifoar ol relmant work eiipcn- 
unca roquLred 

SUBMIT A COMPtETEO appli- 
cation, lotior Ol intgrcr.1. 
rtrcumn entl topres ot ofliQiil 
tranntrrptB ol du^r-fiuQ PraanD 
contact HiHTinn FUsowrcmj. 

1647] s4a-aoe& nnd mff 

|Sd7] 223 SG15. Tor more 
intdrmoLori 
CtALECe Of LAKE COUNTY 
193S1 W Wooi-umjU" St 
G-ayalttfcaJL60O3O-1i90 
AA/EOE/nl/r/«/* . 



w 



Put Your Career 

On The Move 

With Pep Boys 

Pep Soys cunenily has 
(he lollowiog lull aod part 
time opportunities avail 
able lor our stores ir 
WAUKEGAN and 

ROUND LAKE BEACH. 

Technicians 
ASE Certified) 

'e Dller e compensBllon 
packago ol up to 
S20.00/hour depending 
upon your experience. 

Mechanics 

In addillDti lo an attractive 
benelns package induct- 
ing mBdicol/dertlal/llle 
insurance, 40 IK and paid 
vacation/holidays, Pap 
Boys oilers a lleiible 4 or 
5 day work week and an 
excellent training pro- 
gram. 

Interviews will be notrj all 

weak at the (ollowing Pep 

Boys locations: 

620 N. Green Bay Rd. 

Waukegan, It. 

B .17-662-6 -5 55 

SIS Rollins Rd. 

Bound Lake Beach, IL 

B47-54IW711 

II unable lo attend an 
Interview, you may call 
708-681-8692 or lax a tel- 
ler ol Interest to 708-4S0- 
0725. Pep Boys supports 
a drug-lree woiklng envi- 
ronment and is an equal 
oppoilunlly employer 

Pep Boys 

Parts, Tires, Service 
www.pepb0y3.com 



November 6, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C21 ; 



3Wsu=. 





7 : trM-'. 



for Mail Processing Equipment 



■ :■...■. 



-a 




Maintenance positions require highly skilled How To Apply 
and experienced individuals. All applicants 
must meet the Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities 
requirements listed on the attached descrip- 
tion, Jobs may include irregular hours. 

Maintenance Mechanic, MPE/07 
Salary: $29,1 84 to $39, 629 

General Qualifications: 



• All applicants are required to pass a 3-hour 
multiple-choice examination, complete a 
Candidate Supplemental Application 
booklet, and complete an interview. * 

• To qualify for postal employment, an 
applicant must be drug-free. This condition 
is determined through the use of a 
urinalysis drug screen. Applicants who 
qualify on the examination, and are in the 
area of consideration for employment, will 
be scheduled for the test. 

• Maintenance positions require prolonged 
standing, walking, climbing, bending, 
reaching and stooping. Employees must lift 
and carry heavy objects on level surfaces, 
on ladders, and/or on stairways. 

• For positions requiring driving, applicants 
must have a valid state driver's license and 
a safe driving record. They must be able to 
obtain a Government Motor Vehicle 
Operator's identification Card. 

• Applicants must have vision of 20/40 
(Snellen) in one eye and the ability to read, 
without strain, printed material the size of 
typewritten characters, glasses permitted. 
The ability to distinguish basic colors and 
shades is required. 

• Applicants may be required to qualify on 
industrial powered lifting equipment. 



Application/Admission Card (PS Form 2479- 
A/B) Is available from, and can be submitted 
to, the postal locarion(s) listed below, (submit 
only one application for all the position(s) list- 
ed on this announcement. Duplicate applica- 
tions will not be honored.) 



South Suburban P & DC 

6801 West 73rd Street 
Bedford Park, IL 60499-9426 

Chicago Bulk Mall Center 

7500 W. Roosevelt Road 
Forest Park, IL 601 30-2296 

Fox Valley P& DC 

3900 Gabrielle Lane 
Aurora, IL 60599-9427 

Applicants will be notified of the date, time, 
and place of examination and will be sent 
material to prepare for the examination. 

USPS-An Equal Opportunity Employer 

9/98 




UNITED STATES 



■ <!■* i m* ***» a* ■■•»«•■ 



POSTAL SERVICE* 

The United States Postal Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer 






>. .. 



'^R 



.• 



R 






i 



I 

I"} 



SI 



C22 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November 6, 1998 




r 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



EH 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



SB 



f| HeJp Wanted 
■J Full-Time 




— 




Like working w/chlldren? 

We're looking (or you! 

THE AFTERSCHOOL 

CLUB has futt/parl 

time spots as 

COUNSELORS and 

COLLECTIONS at Sites 

all over Lake County! 

Call Roberta at 

847-573-0252 



•u 



KINDERCM1E 
Learning 

Center 

in Mundclcin 
'jvkinp full time 
I him nun for 

!2Yr. Old 

Teacher 
• Toddler 

Teacher 

Wr pHivnlr j IfjFvmvtifi 
jlMHMpl»Tr. K'Kflils and 
luiiipruiivc <j|jry i jM 

847-970-9554 




wauconda based 

business has a full 

time warehouse 

position available. 

Must be able to lift 

heavy Items, 

Salary plus benefits. 

Call 

847-526-1380 



Growing church In 

Lmka Zurich U SookJng for 

a /or a faU-tliam mrtmlaU- 

trntiw* mtmbtmmL »'« **"» 

looking tor nowiu »Wt/i 

good attic* m i iu tttriiJ 

iklU* «nd jrood cnjnjmtcr 

Jtnoarlntec. If jw **» • 

quic* ;c*Fx.cj- «arf arou/d 

enjb j arwfcinjr *» ■ 

cJiurcA office, calf 

Felix MMlJirmr at 

W7-f«MWft 



Nolan's on ihc Lake 

Antloch, IL li reopening! 

looking for 

experienced 

■MJnrtcndcrs 

-!■ Waitresses 

•J-Cook 

Call 791-1186 for 
interview appt. 



GREAT JOBS COME 

IN ALL SIZES AT 

GREAT LAKES CREDIT UNION! 

Forget one sue fits all! At Great Lakes Credit 
Union we've got all kinds of pbs to choose 
from! With over 1 15,000 members and over 
$300 million dollars in assets you can bet we'll 
keep you motivated and challenged Here's your 
chance to find what's right for you' 
We are currently accepLinti aniilicatinns liir 

■ Calf Center Reps 

■ Financial Service Reps 

■ Loan Data Entry Reps 

■ Computer Operator 

■ Full Time Tellers 

■ Reconciliation Specialist 

■ Management Accountant 

■ Visa Reps 

■ ATM Reps 

AJI positions require i'«n>ilrrtit i.usuimw service 
ability i:ash handling t'tpuncm.f and PC tsxiien- 
i'iki' Prior financial ©cpeweflCe a plus 1 

in iH'turn we oflnr medicnl/iit-'ntal. 401k, 
■'uiuun Reitnbursement. mtinihly incentives. 
pai.t varations holnJay anil sick time, personal 
Ufi ■• on-site training, and career development 1 

Ajiji', in person or maii/la* resume to 
Attn: Staffing, GLCU, 2525 Green Bay 
Road, North Chicago, IL 60OB4. 
Faa:847-BB7-8798. Email |cnc@glcu ore) 

Visit imr Web site at www gleu urg 
GLCU is .in Equal Opportunity Employer 



Retail Managers 

New Cw&ey? 



3E 




An Ohio Oil 
company needs 
mature person 

now In the 

GRAYSLAKE 

area. ReiJardlc** of 

experience, write 

J.T. Read 

P.O. Box 696 

Dayton, OH 45401 



Hankln if' 

$509 SIGNOSBONVSUt 
FIRST BANK OF HIGHLAND \PARK 

Friendly fit professional atmosphere!] Onr bank Is 
looking (or energized, team players to Oil the fol- 
lowing positions: 

COLLECTION TELLER 
(Mi^tfJt/ira.) 

Requires an Individual with a mln. of t yr. teller 
experience. ResponslbDllles vriil lnclade collec- 
tion Items, & all other dally routine teller transac- 
tions. 

TELLERS 

(JHtn.SS.TJ/JBU 

Requires an Individual with a mln. of 1 yr. cash 
handling experience. Previous teller experience li 
a plush 

rioUi positions require detail-oriented Individuals 
who are effldent & accurate, along w/ exception- 
al customer service & communication jsldf lb . If yon 
are Interested In working fbr ah established com- 
munity bank w/quallty benefits, please contact 
Deb Elliott at (847)492-7800 X4»3. EOE 



m mm 



v 



Chock oui Jewel-Osco foi the "one stop shop" for 
all youi career needs We offer our managers the lia- 
bility ond rcwaidj ol |Oining a S 1 9 billion retail food 
and diug company with the chanco lo advonto and 
leorn new skills along the way Our 4 slop develop- 
ment program can help gel you there ii you hovo I ho 
desire, (o succeed 

Join ui and enjoy on oxceplionol compeniahon pock- 
age which mcludos heolth/lilc insurance, 40 IK and 
a merchandise discount For on immediate mlerview, 
loiward your resume in confidence to Osco Drug, 
Attn: Marty, 3030 Cyllerton Drive, Franklin 
Park, IL 60131. FAX: 888-541-5793. 

Jewel-Osco 



www.americandrugitorei.ccim 

EOE M/F/O/V 



WANTED 

A FEW GOOD EDUCATORS 

CHARACTER, EDUCATION, ACHIEVEMENT... 
RAISING THE STANDARDS 

IN DISTRICT 187 t 

COORDINATOR OF INFORMATION TECIINOLOCV 

I Salary Rango: S50.000 - J35.00 

I Education. flachclor'i Decree or higlm 

|Expononeo 1 or marc yean in Tcthnnltigy Tin NonJi Chicago School Dutnn 

li viking on energetic, mniw educator la he rtlfwniiblc for our dttiriel wide 
irtluiciUigy including viiicu. voice anil dala (LAN & WAN). Superviw all 
niprcli of iIk fxi.hlcin ami rclunl equipment Rcipomihle far Jcvcloping and 
maintaining cDnfmchenuvc. multiple ilalnhaici (Jala warchouitng. Uatanajc- 
linking, data itarning liar diilncl oidc uic. Candidfu; mutt be finulias wlih tile 
[ami cducaiinnil pliitutuptiies and oxnda. 

BQJNGUAL/ESL PROGRAM COORDINATOR 

Vt'i anr warchinf for Mitntonc ohu ran pnnkir iupcrmr IcKknJtip fur the 

, drvtltipmtni. inijilcincniaium. and rruinlcnancc nf acumprchtiMrte Billngual/ESL Pnifram in our tclaxil. 

Sprofic mnnniihililwi wnuld include develop and pncaenl pnfeuioiul dcvclopmeni acitviltet fiir family. 

pnikkic leaderthtp ai leachcn. pamxa and admuiiiiraton on the ulcclinn uF luppliet, cquipmrol and 
ouiructiunal iruteruli hit the nmg ram. Thii penoo will alw he eapected to provide aaiiujnrs oo lupervifr- I 
inf and evaluating die need* nf ihe program A nil! in meeting ihc individual guali and aipiratkiea of 
■ludenit, «i ~rlt at ilKir putmnality, inierrtl and dcciIl Muil piiiicii a Type 79 Teaching Ccniricah! 
I SfiUiry: Ctmoneniurale wilh experience 

OTJItR POSITIONS OPEN Middle School Teacher. High School Science Teaclrr. High School 0D 
Teacher. M iddle Schmit LD Teacher, Elementary DD Teacher, EJemcnlary LD Teacher. N vine I H N I S. Title. 

I Reading Teacher. 
ClmuiF dale (in all pmiliont: November ), 1941 
Siaridjue Ni.venihcr 30, 1991 

Director of Human Reururcei 

2000 Lewis Avenue 

North Chicago. IL 60044 

Fax: (S47) 689-7348 



■M ~ $mm 



Seasonal 
Opportunities 



.' -, - ... L ■ ■ ■ , ■ - j 



Hptflil A/Innnc*0irv\ I Catalo ff ue Fulfillment Positions | 

iVCtCill iVlLiritlgVrb j | Pleasant Company, a dynamic direct mail \ 



Staffing jVbu? ^orjiolidayj-felp 

♦ Dining Room r <& Banquet ArVaitstafF - : 
V Dishwashers > Bar Help 
♦ Banquet Set-up ♦"Hostess ♦• 

Unlimilcd possibilities! Earn extra money for ihe 

holidays! Full lime or pan time. Varied hours available. 

We'll work wilh your schedule. Permnncnl positions 

available. Apply in person Tucs.-Sal. 

Country Squire 

( t\estaurant rf 'Banquets 

Rts. 120 & 45, Grayslake • 847-223-0121 



I lobby Lobby Creative Centers, one 

of America's fastest growing aris and crafts 

chains, has immediate openings for experienced 

retail managers. The strongest candidates will 

be self motivated, relail oriented managers wilh 

experience and background 

in mass merchandising. 

• Competitive Salaries 
•40 IK Plan 

• Medical/Dental 

• LiTc Insurance 

• Merchandise Discounl 

• Flex Spending Plan 

j Experienced relail managers willing to relot-m- 
should send resume and references to: 




§ seasonal Ce 
6 for our D 
^ Wisconsir 




H SS& 



10575 East Washington, Indianapolis, IN 46229 
Fax (317) 897-0867 

Ann Mail Young • No piainc colli plraie HiiWiy I „>l>hy r* 
nn njual opponunuy cinpiuyrr 

Sec us at: www.hobbylobby.com 



including g 
i seeking s 
Catalogue Fulfillment employees 1 
Distribution Center in Wilmot, 
Wisconsin. Pleasant Company's clean. i 
modern facility reflects our emphasis on | 
f| fostering high employee morale. ,ind our i 

commitment to excellent f*. Wc- rjffer 
8 weekend premium pay. genr-rous ptrxliK t | 

discounts, and a seasonal \x>um'. 
^Qualifications: 
|» Attention to detail .i must 

Prior warehouse expr-rif-rif •• pfvfauffl, 
but not required 

Ability to remain ralrn urtff*M pr»-,-,i*fn 
Ability to work as p,m of a u-.uh 




Reasons to work for 

Pleasant Com pany: 

1 Friendly Work Environment 

2 Generous Product Discounts 

3 Weekend Premium Pay 

4 Bonus 

Pleasant Company, maker of high quality 

< hildron's books, dolls, and accessories, is now 

hiring full-time seasonal employees. 



CATAUHJUI. PUU ; IU.MHNT-$7.30 Pt-lt HOUR 






| Stop in bet> 
1 to 



g Ple;\sant Company ha-, ,i v.irWMy t,\ rxi\in»,ii-. 
available in our [JiMri|jutK>n C»*ntf r. 
including but not lirnilffl to fkk,-r.. 
P.\ckers. an<l Gift Wrappers 
between 8:O0 A.M. .trtd G.(X) I'M 
apply In person or call 
414-862-7578 
if you have further questions. 
Pleasant Company is located at 
12400 Fox River Rd, 
Wilmot, Wl 53192. 
EOF. 



| 

1 



W ; Please call JDarrei [ or'-Paula to place your 
5easor»ai; Opportunity Help >w:antecl ads^QDAyf (847] 213-8161 



Day Shift: 7A.M.-3:30 PM. 

J'li:k, park nnd load orders. Previous 

production / fulfillment experience desired. 



OHDKIt PHOGIiSSOKS - $7.90 PliR HOUR 



Ptiitism customer phone/mail orders. Good verbal 

communication skills and prior computer or data 

entry experience required. Must type 30 wpm and be 

available to work a minimum of 20 hours/week. 



STOP IN IHiTWIilaN «:(!() A.M.& 4:30 P.M.TO APPLY 



or Call 4 1 4-062-7578 if you have further questions. 



IPLEASANTI 
[COMPANY 



12400 Pox River Road -Wilmot, Wisconsin 



' ■■ 1 






November 6, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C23 



220 



| ; ,'Htip Wanted. 



220 



Help Waited 
Full-Time 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
Pull:Tlme &. 



220 



Help Wanted 
"Fml-Tlme % 



220 



WILDLIFE JOBS 
tO$2i;60/HR v 

inc Benefits.' Game wardens, 

security, maintenance, park 

rangers. No exp needed. 

For app. and exam Info call 

1 -800-813-3585, ext 2407. 

eam-gpm, 7 days. 



n n^^^n 5* n^^^:^n 



************ 

DRIVERS-OTR & SINGLES 

U-S. Postal Service Contractor 

needs qualified Drivers with 

exp. 515,95 per hour. Bring 

MVR and physical to; 

CONTRACT TRANSPORT 

8750 W. 82nd Place 

Justice, Illinois 

1-888-883-4509 

F.0E/AAP 

************ 



Iv >V>VT0$1b\35rHR 

.WCeENERTSLNOEXPeftENCE I 

RFOHAPP.WOEXAM" ■ 

'.V .tN=aCAlL-." . I 

I 1 -800-813-3535 

■ B A M • 9 P M. 7 DAYS lite, Six ■ 

■ , ■-.•.■•• 



HV.A.C 

New-Construction 
'; '■::;:' Installer- 
EXPERIENCED ONLY 
V.0LSEN Heating & 
Air Conditioning, Inc. 

• : Lafe Villa, IL 
(84y)356-358l| 



! CUSTODIAL I 
j FULL TIME { 

J McHenry High School j 
I ServiceMaster Is seeking | 
I custodial help at McHenry J 
J High School, Contact Mary ! 
I or Mike at 81 5 -344-7 1 78 \ 

Mem.- Fri. 8am to 1pm. 
■ Applications available at j 
! District Maintenance Office, I 

4724 Crystal Lake Rd., i 
I McHenry. IL 80050 Or fax I 
I resume to: (815) 344-7179. ■ 

tajaaa»aiaMaHBMM«aBiV 



/. : Myot*^:'v ■ 
lUnctergoften Toocfw 

'."'.? '•\-tirtM'' 

. .Whlhirab/ 
NpooJi.. .„ 
■ ' • Fc*fail ftjj ' 

CHILD CARE TEACHER 

. 'MTw . 
• t-fwiercel 

Eduoa'cortqpjTtd 
•Tbpfau . ^ 
Y*j offer on lmovalh« tdod with a 
tfcvttopncntafopproodi. 

FUME CALL 

mi) 356-2288 



Start a Home-Based Business. 

Work Flexible Hours. 

Enjoy Unlimited Earnings. 




CABINET HFC 
GEN. MGR. 



""\ 



«&a»*a«0t3**ft 






CALL TOLL FREE (800) 735-8867 



immed Opening. Come South 

to Atlanta, GA. High-end 
comml laminated cabinet m(r 
seeks cxp Gen. Mgr. Req'd 
exp tncl cabinet mfg. 
CNC/automolrve eqpint 
scheduling, installation & 
blueprints. Company 
experiencing dramatic 
growth, expanding controls. 
Competitive compensation 
pkg, Fax resume w/salary 
| history: C. Pol chan, President.! 
Spec-Line 404-816-0248 X 



3 





a 





il 



EDUCATION 

Central Baptist Is 
recruiting at Bright 
Beginnings Child Care 
Or, Uke Villa (or the 
■ following positions. 
tt 'Full & pari time 

8* Teacher* & 
Ass t Teacher 
8 Experienced preferred. 
_ Comp. sal., outstanding 
benefits Inc!., health, 
dental, 11 pd. holidays 
plus vacation. College 
Scholarships Available. 
Fax 847 356 9424 
Call 847-356-4112 
Q EOE 



tt 



3 

! 

* 
a 

S 



ao 



a 



a»aaa*aaa»a 



MARKETING 
COORDINATOR 

LoNq-TinM, HA*ds-QN, F/T qrtou/ilt oppomuNiry (or 

PERSON Willi wlttQ tXp; COpy/CONClpl/COMpUTEtl/f,RAplficS 

skills. DyNAMic, qnounNq promoiIonaI compANy iri 
HiqliUiNii P*nk. Omrliis. SMokf-fitn inv. Fax okqitNcI & 
wUfty nig. 

(847)452-8557 
AttN: Scoti 



R* 



ra^ 




Olando's Pizza 

843 Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach 

(847) 546-7744 




II you're a "Sweet-TalklrV Guy"(or Gal) 

Stroll your "Blue Suede Shoes" 

down to Olando's lo 

fill out an application for 

PHONE HELP 
DELIVERY DRIVERS 

(Mot) have valid itconio ft frauranco) 



J 6 



Applicants must be: 

Customer friendly, dependable. 

willing lo work weekends ft evenings. 

We hope to 
"See You Later Alligator" 



ft 



cinM.AT™ism;KiDiwH..0,RMENT d Attention Bread Lovers ! 



y^r c * re lo °klng for someone who is 

dependable, responsible, organized and 

enjoys working with the public. If this is 

you, Lakeland Newspapers has the perfect 

career opportunity waiting For you 

in Circulation Sales. 

! We offer great benefits! 

• Salary plus Commission 
■ Health Insurance 

• Dental Insurance 

• Disability 6 Life Insurance 

• A Matching 401K Plan 
•Phone Reimbursement 

So if you're sclf-molivaied. highly organized, 
and very personable, you're sure lo be a success. 

Experience a plus, but will train the right 
person. For an interview appointment call 

Karen O'Toolc 
Lakeland Newspapers 

(847) 740-4035 > 



Be a part of rin n ward-winning tea mof 

European Style bread makers. Enjoy 

excellent wages and flexible schedules in 

an exciting, fun environment. 



Full and part-time positions available for: 
*Mixer (3rd shift) *BakcJr 
♦Production *Counter ) 
No experience necessary. We'll train you. 



Fax resume or info (847) 740-9775 

or apply in person on 

Monday, Nov. 9 or Tuesday Nov. 10 

10:00am - 1:00pm and 4:30pm - 6:30pm 

at 524 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 




BREftDSflirTH 



Internet 
Opportunities 



Lakeland netDIRECT, Chicagoland's 
premier Internet access provider, has 
ground floor opportunities for people 

interested in the Internet. We are 

looking for a Project Administrator 

to coordinate the development of the 

web sites for businesses and 
organizations. If you are interested in 
creating a future with a rapidly grow- 
ing organization, fax resume to 

skw, (847)223-8810 
ore-mail: skw@us-netdirect.com 



DON'T LET THESE 
OPPORTUNITIES PASS YOU BY! 

Midwestern Regional Medical Center ia a slalo-ol-ihs-art facility where 
you'll find personal and professional career growth. Put your lalenis to work 
lor a company trial will reward you lor your talents. 

Sao lor yoursell the dilferoni afflnronmeni we provide and become a pan ol 
a team where your skills are valuodl 

Server/Grill 

Full-Time, 1 1:30am - 6pm, every other weekend tt required 

Responsibilities include preponno sandwiches, food serving and gnll work. 

COOK 

Full- Time. Flexibility lo work ahlfti between 

6:30am • 7pm, weekends as required 

Prior Qxpenenco preferred 

STOCKROOM CLERK 
Days: Monday - Friday 
Full -Time 
Ability lo till SO IDs. on a regular basis and sirong organizational skills 
needed. 

All pa i mom require excellent communication skills. 

Competitive wojjo and excellent benefits. For consideration apply in person 
or tax/send resume/lerter ot Interest {INDICATING POSITION OF INTER- 
EST) to: Jeannle Pfluoger, Human Resources. 2520 Ellsha Avenue 
ZJon, IL 60099. Fax: (M7> 672-6222. EOE IWF 




lECIQIi* t MEDICAL C t H T, [ I 
Tomorrow's Hospital la Hens Today. 



Help Wanted 
' :Rill-Hme \ 



220 



Hdp Wanted: 
Full-Tune '• 



220 



;i Hdft Wanted? 
RiB-llme 



CUSTODIAL 
POSmON 

AVAILABLE 

. ., , .■ . - ■ • 

•-■V -.. • : .. 

Full time days. Wilt also be 
. trained as a substitute bus 
driver. If interested, please 
contact Dr. Jim Meozcr at 
Millbum School, 18550 
Millbum Road, Wadsworth 
(847)356-8331. 



One Cooks 

Saute, Broiler. 

AM & PM i wail ; staff, 

bus persons 

FUN, GREAT PAY, 

FLEXIBLE HOURS/ 

IMMEDIATE 

OPENINGS 

high energy pub & grill 

Duke's (847) 526-0002 

Wauconda . 



Hiaintenance! 
mechanic ■ 
fulltime 

l McHenry Hloh School i 

I ServiceMaster is seeking a I 
I quality minded mechanic to I 
■" .work at McHenry High 
> Scnooli Qualified candidate ■ 

■ will possess general skills ■ 

■ In HVAC, electrical, plumb- ■ 

Ing and carpentry. Some J 

I heavy imirtgrequlred. Must ; 

- 1 be available for weekends a 

■ as needed. Knowledge of | 

swimming pool mafnte- ■ 
I nance anddigitat building | 

■ control systems a plus. Full I 
I time position includes bene- 1 
I fits. Call Mike or Mary at t 
I 815-344-7178 or fax 

I resume Jo: (815) 344-7179 ■ 



Immed O 
Delivery Driven. Pv 

bated In Ch go 

'Daytime & eve 

'Home dally ,'Comp 

bnfts *Exc eqpn 

Quaimcetlona; Valid 

te(CUt*A)*aood 

driving records *Mui 

drug screen A 

■Mtn 2yrs deDvery 

*Muct be retlab 

'Appliance Insta 1 



EOE 



■1 



SALES PROFESSIONALS 

If you're rethinking your career, want to be paid 
based on your efforts and have experience in a public contact role, 
we'd like lo talk with you. 
We are Sentry Insurance, a multi-line company, and 
we arc seeking entrepreneurial individuals to join 
our sales team. We often 
•CompcUltvc «aJusi7 (not a draw), plna cttmmlulou 
•PoU rmole of employee bcncQta 
•Comprehensive, paid training 

•Proven ttJllni avftcm 

•Pall line of qnsJJty product* 

•We provide the oCBoc tad adminiatntiVc 
•npport 

Call I-80O-528-2643 or send resume lo: 
SENTRY INSURANCE 
977 Lakcvicw Pkwy.. Suile 170 
Vernon Hills. iL 60061 
FAX (847)816-6772 EOE M7F 
www. scntry-insurancc.com 







:V.: 






y-'*thi'lL" 



. ings, for Individuals to assist 
'pi^eratiqns.In. branch location. 
^^s^Qi^fSl Itjule^SfvHll Ipcluder."si3tti ng up papers 

■y : -'^^;fp^^e)lTO^ : ^'well as for 
^^•xx^rQM!^ence of distributor. 
ilGii rant openings In ;the following locations: 

Guinee 



rayslake 




Lake Zurich 



("ork- 3-4, Hours a day with flexibility In starting and 
& jmes. Starting pay Is $9,62/hr. plus benefits 



For more information call: 

(847)427-4333 



Graphic Artist 

WANTED 

...To work in a creative atmosphere 

designing display ads. Candidates 

must know QuarkXPress for Macintosh. 

Experience in Photoshop, Illustrator, 

and Freehand helpful, but will train. 

Must have good typing skills. Please 

mail resume and salary history to: 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Attn: Ad Services 

Supervisor 
30 S.Whitney St., 
Grayslake, IL 
60030 





Rnril Qwks'NEEdEd 

Baffin trkiude idvatiaul 
ASitstAfkc, coxpr r/f/if wmh* 
& opikyud ItutikcoviiiAtf. 

-flffUfJD* *?***** ' 

. -AikfoKDAwr* 

CoKXtKofRf. 12 & 

Hvf MOlnVoio 

AsJt km pAnk . v 
CoKf,i*olRi.22& 
l2WUkt'Zoridh- "■ 




Utile Cesser* Pizza In 
Ortyslake Is looking 

A$$IJTANT6i 
C0-MANACER5 

Interested candidatos 

BTKruldapptyot 

15 Commerce Dr. 

@ Center Strsst 

QraystakavIL 

(S47jrMO-ft100 

orcstlJerlii 

(847)397-7700 

.<£> 

Utile 
Coesaxs" 

Equd Opporluny Drrtorw 



7C 



cceunt 

Due lo continued fttnvth, pri- 
vate company is seeking 
rciptmilble representative lo 
develop telephone rapport and 
aitist individual! In processing 
Medicaid applications. Must 
have abiiity to learn complex 
technical Information lo com- 
municate effectively with vari- 
ous individuals and govern- 
ment employees, maintain 
reconls. process work under 
lime constraint, and wurk with 
computer lo process and docu- 
ment activity. We offer a com- 
petitive salary and 
excrlienl benefits to the 
selected individual that shows 

a sirong wort ethic and 

positive outlook. Send resume 

with caver tetter to: 860 

Northpoint Blvd. 

Whukcgan. IL 60085 

altn: Kim Chapman 



IKK 



Immed Openings. $1 000 Sign on 

Bonus. FaniTy orienled co. 
needs Owner Operators lo run 

regional interrrodal.Chgo- 
Circinnatj market. Home most 

wknds. IrxTned opprys. If you 
have lyr OTR exp, 23yrs age 4 

good driving record, call us 

TODAY 

800-78W2&5 or 513-541-4400 

or 600-950-9034 x9 



Janitorial 

LEAD CUSTODIAN 
3rd Shift 

Grayslake Campus 

RESPONSIBLE FOR 
assisting in ine supervision ol 
custodians and maintaining 
Inventory records and the 
general cleanliness and sani- 
tation ol (he college campus 
A HIGH SCHOOL or GED, 
custodial experience and 
knowledge of custodial field 
programs ara-requlred. The 
abiiity to provide leadership 
and dependability and follow 
instructions is necessary. 
Excellent communlcafjon 
skills are essential. 
SUBMIT A COMPLETED 
application to Human 
Resources by November 1 1 , 
199B, for full consideration. 
PLEASE CONTACT Human 
Resources, (847) 543-2065 
andTDO»(lJ47) 223-5615, 
tor the hearing fmpatred. 

COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY. 

19351 W.WMhfnrjtcmSt., 

Grayslake, IL 50030-1198. 

AA/EOE/m/f/d/v. 



• 



■aaaaa- 



i — i'- -.-^i;. 



..^L 1 ^ 



m*^***** 



C24 / lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 




Help Wanted 
Full -Time 



Modern Manufacturing 

Firm looking for a 

Full-Time entry level 

OFFICE CLERK 

Position includes 

clerical duties 

as well as computer 

responsibilities 

Will troln. 

Apply in person 

MORGAN BRONZE 

PRODUCTS 

367 Hollow Hill Dr. 

Wouconda, IL 



ISO. 



In search of that 
perfect employee? 



Joyce can help yoyjftiK) 

tho poffoet pwlionf ;•':■ 

call todayio jjof your;- 

JwT(^anfcd£MB3poal i 

^^po^lty,m'KliCaJ .} 

opportunity or job WfM 

M. the .next GrsntjLpKes 

%'V/*^Ehi|i«illn;^ F 



REGISTERED 

X-RAY TECH 

NEEDED 

Full lime far fesi 
paced □rFhoperJic 

practice in Ournee. 

Call 1847) 336- 

333S or Apply at 

202 5. Greenleaf 

Suite A, Ournee, IL 



:ni ! njtsicc ik si'tAiny |iTnti".\tiiiuii j 

I rKAt'iii:RS«.ri.s » 







Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



f YWCA \ 

Has Immediate 

opening for a case 

worker In our 

department of 

Human Services. F/T 

with benefits must 
have data entry com- 
puter skills & cus- 
tomer service experi- 
ence Please apply In 
person 
YWCA 2133 
Belvfdere Rd. 
Waukegan 
(847) 66Z-4247 
EOE 



J 



I on I Nurse to work 
at school with an ele- 
mentary aged dis- 
a hied student. 7-8 
hours per day, $15-20 
per hour husccl on 
c. xpv rivtu ' e /'lease 
call Cathy Friar 
(S47) J56-2J85 
I Mkc Villa School 
District #41 



irnl 



Wokk Ci.o.sf To Home! i 

f Wr li.ivu 

tMMirUliMI:OI>i:NIN(iS fur: 



ASSEMBLERS (»7 isj'llr) 
jMimilrlrln hi !• s«'.l Shlfl) 
DATA ENTRY <Scj 7 i/llr) 
l.akr Mluff Hnm si'rii 
Tfinp n> hiri- 
RECtlTTON (U,/hri 
Gurrirc Mrilu.il niciiininiM 
IH'Ctll'd tinimn (pill (I'll'*) 

SECRETARY fS ( ;K) 

I ifwrTyvlllr Envi ulivr li'vl'l 

liixirs limn ;|)in 



Gri'nr work ruriromrirrilifl 
Brncflri rn'ciflnhlc. 



iHJ7) 2-l£o8H'J 

AccuStaff 




CiVii-hiy Gnmmls 
Ahittifi'ihitia' 

\V~>r/. .W\u )lnu .\n;C 

i- Jj'li.'iM." l xjMxusr. I..' ,', . I'UI ?i.P II 
(,,,111, IVi-n.l-K-ll /till /<■''' Hftf 

Cull Mx Vemll 
/-7OS-P/9-6I00 

Catholic Ceme/i'rii'.v 

Archilh h rsc of Chicago 






« TKACHKR ASS1S TAM S " 

I Irir inliifiK imd HHir )c,» ivl«K J 

rumiXltHu' ulary, 

\' : .cxcfllcnl Itcurtitt A: | 

:l -si Irani work jtimw.plifcrr J 

* f"Hfli»47» m 'fin I 

I t,OI: 



Insolatteiv § 

Installers ' 
Needed 

Hiring Bonus 

Southern Wl 
& 
< Northern IL area 
■Builders, Insulation 

(815) 675-0085 

M«M4M«PltlMM*l*llltMI»*IM*ltl|l*IMI*tl 

OfficE Posmoisi 

Are you ntlmblc, 

ENniqinc md Fun to 

u/onk with? If you Iiavo 

bAsic computer skills, 

MEdlCAl OR dtNTftl officE 

ExpERJENCE md qood 

ATIENTiON lO dEiftil, OUR 

busy orul suRqEiiy office 

MAy bE tllE plACE TOR 

yout Tills Front oFMce 
posirioN requires lull- 

TIME llOUliS (NO U/EEk' 

ENds) ANd SAlARy is 

bASEd UDON EXPERIENCE. 

CaII 
(647)625-59(5 

TO FlNd OUT MORE. 

M»IIIMI*IIMMM»MIM„M< ,,»»»**„,»■■■■■■ 



GENERAL OFFICE 
BOOKKEEPING 

l»niiii'ili,ilt' o|»'ninn |nr ,i 

r.rli.iblr .iritl ilfl,iilc*H i ir I t-i rf - 

t'tl |if.r\tin I )uhr>. tit tin linle 

.(iimvitiiij; [lhuiii's. Ivpinj;. 

A,'.fc and Aj/I' i'ajk-iu'Ih r .1 

; huis! S.il,ir^ li.tsi-d upon 

i"(|ii'rii-n( i 1 

1 ,.ll lH-47r J.'1-mi'H 

H:)J I ,n ri'vin™ 1 [<i 

• H.T7UJ \-Hh\i<i. 

Attn Lftfj 



Work in a fan ptueit etm 
nmiiH'iit. Day*, \ome tarty 

evenings, (ilternutiiii; 
Vmuw/iWi CrtHt/>«fcr (-xpert 
eme mpiimf Apply In per 

\<m or send resume to: 

MundeleinAnimal Hospital 

1133 W. Maple Ave. 

Mundehin, IL 

.Vrj phone catls plant 



Owner Operators 

CJualiliod Owner Oporaiors need- 
ed tor local pick-up and (Jolivory 
Tired ol the road? Want lo bo 
homo overy night and every weoh 
end 1 CC Mid West, Inc. has a 
great Opportunity lor you Our 
innovative compensation 
package includes 

• HOOO DO S.gn-OnBonm 

• Guamnlnd Weekly Sfltltamenli 

• Mileage ftnd Tonnage pay 

• WwKr/ Paflofinanee FJonut 

• Ireentiva tor Mutipkt Contracta 
« Lew-Coal Irauranca 

• La-ata la Puxhsta Tractor* AvailabJ*. 
Mo Depoiil n«qujfad 

COL with HAZMAT and troclor- 
Imiler experience required. Year- 
round operation. Secure your 
future and grow wilti us. Call now! I 
EOE 

1-877-488-9429 




Help Wanted 
■ Full-Time 



uwking roa 

ACAUZHOIANCB 
CUSIQKEK SERVICE 

8*t « p p al n t ira M it« lor Oa (»t*tl 

grtMtins iomUdng Itrm bi DUnoia. 

Work In our comloitaM* Buttalo 

QroYtsmc*. rTaPThoura 

«vafi*bi«. UiU tCoo/br * cammtt- 

aloiVbonusAitniflt*. CUteorllt 

tOO-UI-154: tor Inltntaw. 



ACCOUNTING 



DIDITt $S0K-53K/yr 

MmHhly rrpaitf. vltam/p, f>n>/i-rii. 

.turlM .11 l.»HP Ujblr I <»#•' 

Cn'jl iiftply 

M,iHfir»< frti(i(ii^Hk*'il 

■Vf IV (ril«Ht' ttMJtll'n 

r»-»-J I tf>. I7IHI 

i ilx-tlyvllh' 
IH47I MZ-Ill? 



t iieut»«. 



■ L ■£ 

$ftiipfifyn$mi 






Growing church in 
[jthc Zurich is lookkyr 

for a (or a full-time 

building maintenance 

manager. We arc looking 

(or someone who la 

handy at a multitude of 

building oriented taslts. 

If you are Interested and 

would enjoy working In 

a church office, call 

Felix \lathew at 

H47-f4O-H2H0 



CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 



rLJRED! S24K - 27K/yr 

I ,, 1 Jli 1.1 J.- .il iJjijili .i ,mtln ,1 

, ,.,■ ) 1; , 1,..,... r i ,. ,"«* p, ■ 

\r,-C*:f i». /M'Jrt, .. ■■ .-"I* 

•-/ n .'■ I.- • 

.. I I U. ' JJ»1 

I 'i«ir\ ^ 11U 
■ iei ■ u,~ 1 J I 



225 



liuum's* 
(J|)j)«rtiJiiiiJt^ 



S7.75 OUT OF POCKET 
FOR $35,000 PAYOUT. 
LET US PROVE IT. (847) 
989-6535. 

A PERFECT 

PART-TIME BUSINESSIt 

2 hours/day earns you 

financial freedom. 

24 hour message. 

(888) 273-5775 




Business 
Opportunities 



THOUSANDS POSSIBLE 
EACH WEEKI 

Earn money processing 

mail at home. 

Send $1.00 and SASE to: 

Bright Futures, 

P.O. Box 86, 

Wauconda. III. 60084. 



! 



WANT TO REACH 8 MIL- 
LION HOUSEHOLDS? You 
can now place your ad in more 
than 600 suburban newspa- 
pers reaching more than 8 mil- 
lion households around North 
America with ono simple call at 
a low. low cost. For details call 
800356-206f. (SCA Nel- 
work). 

WE'LL SHOW YOU THE 

MONEY! (Just call our clients) 
3-5hrs./wk. Prepaid phone 
card machines. $10,800 ra- 
quirod. Free info. 1-800-876- 
3326 CardMart of America, 
Inc. 

WORK AT HOMEI Would 
$500$ 1500 extra dollars 
come in handy before Iho 
Holidays (414) 653-9677, 
outside Wisconsin 1-888-603- 
9727. 

WORK FROM HOMEI 

Earn $500-$1500/month 

Part-Time. 

$2.000-$6,0O0/month 

Full-Time. 

Complete training. 

Paid Vacations. 
Call (8471 622-3729 

Eusiress 
Opportunity 

In Antioch Illinois for 

1H yejfs, (his respecled 

"lufn-kcy" Antique and 

Collectible Business 

tiulutlL's. the $485,000 
inventory, consignor 

,iik1 invcnlory d.itah.isf.', 
,nul .lvvard winnin|,> 

Inlcriicl site. Owner is 

retiring l»ul will (jfft'r 

ir.iiisilum .issisUiUf. 

AUr.H lively prit i*d .it 

S17VO00. 



i.]]A< }\77.')m[) 



250 


Stlioiil/lnsiniftimi 



PIANO LESSONS 
OPENINGS Now lor stud- 
ents 6yrs to adult 
Over 25yrs. experience. 
REASONABLE RATES. 
(847) 35&-27B0. 



301 



Antiques 



BE FINANCIALLY INDE- 
PENDENT. National Compa- 
ny needs hones!, dependable 
person m this area. Service 
Retail/Commercial Accounts 
with name brand snack/drink 
products. 4-6 Hours/Week. 
Earn S50K (potential). $8.00.0 
investment. Won't interfere 
with present employment. 1- 
B0Q-463-6678. 

CALLING ALL LAKE COUN- 
TY MOM'S!!! Bright Begin- 
ning's Family Day Care Net- 
work is looking for nurturing, 
responsible, creative individu- 
al's who would like to start 
their own buisnBss while slay- 
ing at home with their children. 
If you live in Lake or McHenry 
County and would like assis- 
tance in getting licensed, on- 
going technical assistance, 
training,, equipment lending, 
and child relerrals ihis pro- 
gram is (or you For more in- 
formation on how lo become a 
quality infant and toddler day 
care provider in your home 
call Dena Thompson at (847) 
356-4112 

EARN EXTRA MONEY 
FOR CHRISTMAS. Order 
takers wanted. Earn $500- 
$1,500 before Christmas 
(847) 546-2296 Se Habla Ex- 
panoi 



INTERESTED IN MONEY 
SAVINGS TIPS And tech- 
niques, budgeting ideas and 
debt reduction strageties?! 
Visit www.zapdQbt.com tor 
your (4)free issues of the Debt 
Zapper e-zine. 

POPCORN VENDING MA- 
CHINES, attractive, reliable 
and produce great tasting hot 
popcorn. Bargain price. Call 
Hector (847) 548-0923. 



ATTENTION ANTIQUE 

DEALERS Auntie's gone but 
her Italian Provincial Furnilure 
lives on! Same wtlh dad's solid 
oak and naugahyde couch 
and chair with end table. Other 
odd and sundry items avail- 
able. All in excellent condi- 
tion Serious inquiries only 
Call tor appointment (847) 
587-8990 leave message. 




Appliances 



GE FRIDGE, ALMOND, 

21.8 cu.fl, side-by-side, like 
new, $500 GE double oven 
range, bottom oven self-clean- 
ing, almond, excellent condi- 
Hon, $250 (847) 362-0536. 

FOR SALE REMODELING 
DUTCH OVEN, matching 
dishwasher and microwave. 
black in color, like new. All 3 for 
$800. (847) 566-0B27. 



CHECK OUT 

THIS 

MONTH'S 



PET OF 



MONTH 



LOCATED 

IN THE 

ANTIQUES a 

CRAFTS/ 
PET PARADE 
SECTION ON 

PAGEC30 



• \" v -" • 

November 6, 1998 



310 



BanaisfJraJis 



328 



Firewood 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture. 1 



ANNUAL CRAFT FAIR 

Saturday, Novomber 7lh, 

8am-3pm. 

Lakoshoro Tabernacle, 

6900 34lh Avo., 

Konoshn, Wisconsin. 

Lavish bake sale, 

Coffee Court. Fall Luncheon. 

Call (414) 694-6299 

for more Info rmation. 

BEANIE BABY & 

CRAFT FAIR 

Round Lake Area Mens Club. 

1102 Cedar Lake Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

November 7th., 

9am-3pm, 

Fun for everyone, 

Raffles and Bargains Galoro. 

Door prizes every 1/2 hour. 

Admission $300. 

For more information 

please call (847) 740-0306. 

CHRISTMAS ON VINE- 
GAR HILL Join the communi- 
ty ol Ml. Pulaski for a day of 
lun wilh crafts, antiques, 
baked goods and food. Maps 
available at the Mt. Pulaski 
Courthouse on Ihe square . 44 
locations and 175+ crafters. 
Mt. Pulaski, Illinois Intersection 
of Rts. 54 & 121 . Saturday, No- 
vember 21, 8am-5pm. Sun- 
day, November 22, 12pm- 
4pm. 



FIREWOOD 8EASONED 
HARDWOODS. Mixed- 

$65/F.C. Oak-$75/F.C. Prompt 
free delivery (847) 247-1700. 

MIXED HARDWOODS, UN- 
SPUT LOGS BY THE TRUCK 
LOAD, $200 DELIVERED. 
(847) 017-5200. 



330 



Gan^e 
Rummage Sale 



Ancient coins 

41 nrrefactS/ 

'■' '- modern jewelry 

settings & many 

more items. 



(847! m-ji8 7 



GARAGE SALE SATUR- 
DAY ONLY 11/7, Gam-3pm. 
Lake villa, Fox Lake Hills Sub- 
division, 37231 N. Lake Shore 
Dr., Qust North of Monavllle off 
Rt. 59 to Lincoln to Lake Shore 
Dr. ) Watch for signs. Clothes, 
furniture, household miscella- 
neous, exercise equipment 

HUGE GARAGE SALE 828 
Cedar Lake Rd., Round Lake, 
Saturdays & Sundays thru No- 
vomber, weather permitting. 

MOVING SALE 25' color 
console TV, 19" color console 
TV, numerous car parts, skiing 
equipment, exercise equip- 
ment, microwave, VCR, CD 
player, (847) 216-2172 for 
more Information. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIQ SALE, and there 
Is still things that |ust did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and- run It 
under the "FREE or Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGE! 
(847)223-8161,0x1. 140. 



338 



Horses & Tacks 



320 



Electronics 
Coniiuiiers 



SAMSUNG SENS 810 UP- 
TOP COMPUTER, lyr. old, 
Windows 95 equipped, 
$2,000. HP694 color printer, 
$200. Or bolh for $2,100. 
(847) B38-2504. 



324 


Farm Guide 



AC 1S0 DIESEL TRACTOR. 
2,700 hours. $6,000/bost. 
(414)843-3454. 



328 



Firewood 



FIREWOOD 2 YEAR sea- 
soned Firewood, delivered. 
Mixed wood, 1-face cord, $65; 
1 -lull cord, $165. Oak, 1-face 
cord. $75; 1-full cord, $195 
(110 pieces in face cord). Stak- 
mg available. (847) 546-0656. 

FIREWOOD OAK, $50 

lace, $135 cord, picked up. 
Delivery extra. (414) 

694-8960. 



1996 FEATHERLITE 2 

horse slant with dressing- 
room. $3,900. (815) 
648^503. * 

20YR. OLD 1/2QUAR- 
TER/1/2 TENN WALKER 
MARE. 16H, greal disposition, 
loads, $950. (815) 675-2749. 

AQHA CHESTNUT MARE, 

6yrs.. 15 1-1/2 hands, pro 
trained excellent hunt seat 
prospect, sound, excellent pa- 
pers, must sacrifice, 
$2,300/besl. (414) 513-0020 
evenings, (414) 246-7474 
days. 

MINIATURE HORSES 

COLTS, Flllys and Brood 
Mares. (847)395-7119. 

MINIATURE HORSES. 

MARES and Stallions. Solids 
and Paints. Reg., $500- 
$1,000. (B47) 467-8520. 

STALLS AVAILABLE. IN- 
DOOR/OUTDOOR arenas, 
wash rack, turnout and stall 
cleaning 7 days a week. Bar- 
rlngton location. $275/monlh. 
(847) 487-8893 lor more In- 
formation. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



3 BUND MICE 

Decorative Mini Blinds, 

Valances and Wall Borders 

for Children's Rooms. 

Call for free brochure. 

1 -800-307-4956. 



BATHTUB ; SPA/ AMERti 

CAN Standard, display mod- 
el, 10~ JbV-82 m x74*. ! New 
$2,400, sen $900/best (647) 

945-^469. ■'-■ ' ■"■ ■'• V : ; • 

BLACK BUNK BEOS, full 
bottom, twin top; with mat- 
tresses, $150/best (847) 263- 
1648. ' '■■ :•■":/■• 

CHINA CABINET/CURIO, 
HUMMELS, oil paintings, 
cross country skier, stair step- 
per end desks, ; (414) 
694-7009; -.-•-•' 

COMPLETE KIHBY 

CLEANING SYSTEM. Must 
sell. Will sacrifice. Antique sofa 
81", good condition. (414) 
279-8245. 

COZY ROOM FURNACE, 

BRAND NEW. $800. {647) 358- 
9466. 

DESIGNER MODEL 
HOMES FURNITURE 

CLEARANCE! 
Sofa/loveseat set, 
hunter green, $493. 
Sofa, white, $350. 

Sofa/loveseat, 

earth tones, $595. 

Also: Plaids, Rorais, 

Leathers and More. 

Dlningroom sets, 10-piece: 

Cherry, $1,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets, 

from $995. 

(847)329-4119. 

DININGROOM TABLE 

42X60, 6-chalrs, 2-leafs, 
I5ln. each, with hutch, solid 
maple, excellent condition, 
$1,500. (414) 857-7842 after 
5pm. 

DININGROOM TABLE, 6- 
CHAIRS, buffet/hutch, Cher- 
rywood, $500/bosl. (847) 
680-6068, 

FiVE PIECE FAMILY- 
ROOM FURNlTUHE SET, 
$300. Call (847) 587-2890 
leave message If necessary,, 

FOR SALE COUCH, great 
condition, $50. Floral pattern 
in earth tone. (847) 872-4234. 

FORMAL DININGROOM 
TABLE, 6 navy blue uphol- 
stered chairs, 1ln. thick bev- 
eled glass top .with dark, hard- 
wood base. $2)400 new, ask' 
Ing $700. Wall minor, 60"x4O\ 
$50. Excellent condition. Must 
see to appreciate. (847) ©73- 
0460, voice mall (847) 209- 
6465. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, If 

you are having a Garage 

Sale or If you have a 

house to sail or apartment 

to rent. 

Call Lisa before 10am 

Wednesday, to place 

your ad here. 

(B47) 223-8181 

ext. 140. 

TWO BLUE MATCHING 
UPHOLSTERED CHAIRS, 

excellent condition. (847) 
623-7278. 




FOSTER HOMES NEED- 
ED! Wanted good, nurturing 
individuals to provide tempo- 
rary homes lor children ages 
birih to adolescent. Training, 
support, compensation, day 
care provided. Contact Cathol- 
ic Chanties/Lake County. 
(847) 782-4242 or (847) 782- 
4243 



FULL-TIME NANNY OR 
DAYCARE PROVIDER 
NEEDED to watch our 
8/month old daughter at our 
Grayslake home or yours. Im- 
mediate opportunity. Please 
call Judi or Erik at (847) 
548-4226 or send qualltica- 
tins to tax number (847) 548- 
4224. 

LAKE VILLA MOTHER OF 
1 has full/part-time open- 
ings, starting November 
17th, also before/after 
school, District 41. Coll 
Anglo (847) 356-0877. 

MOTHER OF 1 has PT & FT 

openings In my Grayslake 
home. Meals and snacks In- 
cluded, lots of activities. (847) 
546-4661 






MOTHER OF 2 loves to 
care for your children in my 
Fax Lake home while you're 
working, full-time, ages and 
up. (847) 973-0791.. 



MOTHER OF 2 with GPR 

and First Aide training, would 
like lo watch your linle one 
while you're at work. Any 
hours, $2/hr. Call Wendy (847) 
546-8695, pager (847) 857- 
0036. 

MOTHER OF 4 will babysit 
your child In her Salem home. 
Field trips, lenced yard on a 
dead-end street. 14yrs. experi- 
ence. References. (414) 
843-2155. 

NIGHT OWL CHILD CARE. 
I will care for your children in 
my home, whose parents 
work 2nd and 3rd. shift. Chris- 
tian atmosphere. Home 
cooked meals provided. (414) 
697-B738. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH Li- 
censed caring home daycare. 
Call Rebecca (B47) 546-4330. 



WILL DO CHILD CARE IN 
MY ANTIOCH HOME, children 
under 5yrs. Have references. 
Snacks and moats included. 
Lots TLC. (B47) 838-5935. 

WILL BABYSIT IN my 

Round Lake Beach home, rea- 
sonable rates, meals provid- 
ed, references available, full- 
lime only. (847) 740-2356. 



■SpanlBh Speaking" child 
care/housekeeper. live-In. 
Sunday off, Room and Board 
and salary. Must be good wilh 
kids. Documentation unim- 
portant. Transportation avall- 
able. (847)838-2038 

CALLING ALL WORKING 
PARENTSIll Winter Is just 
around the corner, have you 
planned your children's day 
care yet? Immediate openings 
for children ages 6 weeks and 
up are available In Bright Be- 
ginning's Home Day Care Net- 
work. For more Information on 
how lo enroll your child In a 
conveniently located, quality 
day care home ploase call 
Dena Thompson at (647) 356- 
4112. SPACES-ARE LIMITED 
SO CALL IMMEDIATELY. 

CHILD CARE - Fun, Clean. 
Caring Child Care in my home. 
(847)731-1197 

CHILD CARE COUNTY 

Certified, lOyrs. experience. 
Full-time days. (414) 
654-1155. 

CHILD CARE NEEDED In 

my Grayslake home, Monday- 
Friday, 8am-5pm., for three 
children, non-smoker, trans- 
portation, experience and ref- 
erences required. (847) 
548-9232. 



rb 



f :"■■■' 



■ 



■ . ■ 



■ ; : ; v.- - 



.• :.: ■: 



■ . ', ' ■■•■ * ■ »■» 



November 6; 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C25 



;.■- ■- 




340 



1 Household Goods 
: FUrnlturt - 



KING BED DELUXE ma- 
tress/box so!, with frame, still 
in plastic, never used, will sell 
$400. (414) 653-9494 Ke- 
nosha. ..' • ■ ■■ " 

KING SIZE WATERBED 
frame and heater, headboard 
with mirror. Air equipment, no 
mattress. Must go. Lake Villa 
area. Best offer/ Take it sway; 
(847)973-0473. >.•-'■ 

LA-Z-BOY DOUBLE RE- 
CLINING SOFA, blue bur- 
gundy, mauve multi-color, like 
new. $300. (414) 857-4605. 

MOVING 3-PIECE BED- 
ROOM set, asking $300. 
(B15) 675-6049. 

MOVING PIONEER ELITE 
and Thlel homo entertainment 
center. Originally $26,000, 
asking $12,000. (847) 

858-1902 evenings. 

SOUTHWEST OIL PAINT- 
ING 61 In. long x 41 In. wide. 
Purchased at Art Gallery In Ari- 
zona. $100/flrm. (615) 
344-3824. 

SPAS-HOT TUBS 

Factory Direct 

Truckload Sale, 

Save 20-30%. 

Purchase from Factory Rep. 

Woodland Pier One 

(414) 534-5264. 



344 



Jewelry 



WEDDING GOWN SIZE 10, 
Cathedral train fully beaded. 
Worth $1,500, sell for $700. 
Marquis diamond engage- 
ment/wedding ring, 31 dia- 
monds. Appraised $2,100, 
sell, $1,200. Call Kim (B47) 
249-6646. 



348 


Lawn/fttFden 


WIL-MOW 321N. LAWN 
tractor with tow bar, $100. 
(414)657-9262. 


350 


Miscellaneous 


TEN FOOT SATELLITE 
DISH, with remote box, com- 
plete, ready to use, $1,500. 
(847)265-7131. 



350 



•- .■ ■ 



■ Miscellaneous 



MOVING SALE I960 Bulck 
LoSabre.V 72,000 \ original 
miles, $600. (2) 1986 Nissan 
Sentra'a $400/oa, 1G91 Chevy 
K-1500 pickup; step side/very 
nice loaded, $8,500.' Tanning 
bed, $1,500. Toshiba laptop 
computer, 233meg., still under 
warranty, .$1,200. '200m eg. 
computer, with monitor, $400. 
Office desk, $20. Engine hoist 
with stand, $120." Messenger 
250 home base CB, $30. 
Kitchen table with 4-chalre, 
$70. Glass kitchen table, $20. 
Coffee table and 2-end tables, 
$40. Full set of Mitchell Car re- 
pair manuals with shelves, 
1982-1995 Foreign and do- 
mestic; $1,200. (847) 
740-2618. 



354 



Medical Equip 
" Supplies 



COMMODE 2-FREE- 
STANDING OR over toilet, 
padded bathtub transfer 
bench, quad cane. (414) 
654-8448. 

GREAT NEWSI DIABET- 
ICS... Medicare pays tor test- 
ing supplies. You've seen us 
on TV. Liberty Medical Supply, 
No upfront cost. Satisfaction 
Guaranteed. Free shipping. 1- 
800-514-7776, (SCA Network). 




CLARINET VITO, NEW, 
$450. (414) 652-1702. 

DOBRO 2YRS. OLD. Asking 
$1.000.(414)652-0064. 

PIANO STARR, GOOD 

shape, needs tuning due to 
age, built In very early 1900's. 
(B47) 872-4234. 




AEROBIC RIDER EXER- 
CISE MACHINE WITH ris- 
er, excellent condition, like 
now. Original $300, best offer. 
(847) 973-0473 after 6pm. 

BEANIE BABIES 00. No 
doubles, excellent condition 
with protector tags. Paid 
$1,300, asking $1,500, worth 
$25,000. (615) 344-420B. 

BUILT-IN ELECTRIC 

OVEN with microwave, stove 
top, hood, $250. 46* Big 
Screen, needs one part, best 
offer. Crib with mattress, $35. 
Buggy/stroller lor two, $40. 
(647) 587-4951 . 

BUNK BEDS • $60.00/besl; 
Exercise Bike - 550.00/best; 
Health Rider - $60.00/best; 
China Hutch - SSO.OO/best; 
Baby Girl Clothes. (647) 360- 
0633 

CASH ON THE SPOT FOR 
YOUR RETIRED BEANIE 
BABIES. Call (847) 

692-6786, 11am-9pm. 

TANNING BEDS, WITH 
FACE TANNER brand new 
condition, 2yrs. old, new 
bulbs, low hours, $t,500/ea. 
(847)949-1924. 

FOB SALE WEDDING 

Oress. long sleeves, very de- 
tailed, must see. Ail extras in- 
CludBd. (847)543-1349 

HOME SCANNER 60 chan- 
nel, Toro and Servl Star mow- 
ers, metal detector, table 
lamps, comer shell, weed and 
bug ellmlnalors, tomato bas- 
kets, counter chairs, 15cu.fl. 
Ireazer. (847) 746-0950. 

INSULATION 4X8 

SHEETS tailback foam: also 
rolls ol toll bubble pak insula- 
lion. Factory seconds. Con- 
tact Ken Nichols. 217-728- 
4217 or 1-800-424-1256. 



SNOWBLOWER SHP, 
ELECTRIC start. 4x8 trailer, 
enclosed, tilt roar gate. (414) 
694-7894. 

SNOWMOBILE 1979 YA- 
MAHA 440, runs, $500/best. 
(847) 740-1384. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 

TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commerclal/homa 
units (ram $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



360 


J Pels & Supplies' 



500 




500 



Hopes For Sale 



MALACCAN COCKATOO, 
SYR old. Very friendly, loves 
to cuddle, flood ; talker, - no 
swear words, cage and sepa- 
rate stand with perch Included. 
Moving to Japan, (847) 
268-1628. 

MALE BLUE GREAT DANE 
bom March 20, 1998, asking 
$400.. Very friendly. (815) 
355-1618 ask for Nancy. ,. 

MALE FERRET WITH 

cage, .$100/best. (847) 
265-7907 after 8pm. ' - 

OBEDIENCE :' TRAINING 
COUNSELING, problem 

solving. In home, 30+years ex- 
perience. Call for details. (414) 
344-2700. ■•• 

PARROT 77MONTHS 

OLD, African Gray Congo 
Parrot. Talks, whistles, cage, 
literature, toys, food. For 
$1,200/best. Call Jeremy 
(414) 763-3918 after 6pm. 

PATIENT AND LOVING 
PERSON NEEDED for shy 
female cat Princess Is a 3yr. 
old spayed, tortoise shell short 
hair. (847) 831-3393 leave 
message. 

PITBULL PUPPIES (7), 
$200/ea or best offer. (847) 
785-1937. 

RHODESIAN RIDGE- 

BACKS, OFA, health, hip 
and temperament guar- 
anteed. Champion sire. $500- 
$1,000.(414)344-2700. 



60 GA.LLON FISH TANK, 
complete saltwater salup. 
Must sell. $400/best. (847) 
265-8037. 

AKC MALE BEAGLE 3yrs. 
wonderful with kids, loveable, 
needs targe properly or farm 
to roam (will come home), 
$150 * negotiable. (414) 
694-2670. 

— 

BID HEAD REDS PIT 
PUPS, all red, red nose, big 
boned, strong Bullison and 
Scroll bloodlines. 4-males, 3- 
females. Call Rudy. (647) 
244-7101. 

BIRD FAIR SUNDAY 

November 8lh, 10am-4pm. 

In The South Hills Country 

Club Banquet Rooms 

I-94 Frontage Rd. 

Just North of Highway 20. 

Racine, Wisconsin. 

Donation $1.00. 

EXOTIC BIRDS OF 

ALL KINDS. 

Cages, feed, accessories, etc. 

Information call Gene 

(414)694-6889. 

CUTE CUDDLY TOY POO- 
DLES AKC, vet checked, 
black, 10/weeks, ready to go, 
3- mates, $300/ea. Melissa 
(847)395-9531. 

FISH TANK 55QAL., com- 
plete with oak cabinet and 
many extras. Worth $500, will 

sell for $200/firm. Call (847) 
587-2890 leave message if 
necessary. 

GERMAN SHORTHAIR 
POINTER PUPPIES, ready 
now. (847)249-3691. 

GERMAN SHORTHAIR 
POINTER, AKC. 9/weeks 
old, first shots, dewclaws, 
ready now Excellent hunters 
and family dogs (414) 
694-6816. 

HELPI1 WE HAVE too many 
dogs!! 10/month old Pekin- 
gese male, black and tan, 
house trained, used to bigger 
dogs, cats and kids. 
$250/FIRM. (847) 265-9567 
after 6pm. 

HORTON FARMS, INC. 
FEED STORE 

High Quality Hay, straw, teed. 
Purina Brand food for dogs, 
cats, sheep and much more. 
We deliver tool 
1/2 mile North of Illinois- 
Wisconsin border. 
Call today (414) 857-2525 
Monday-Friday 
8am-5pm. 
Saturday 8am-3pm, 

LICENSED DOG CARE 
IN MY HOME 

While you're away. 

Call Florence 

(847)966-6319. 

LLAMAS BABIES READY 

now, great color and dispos. 
Great pets. Call Melissa (647) 
740-7464. 



364 



Restaunuil 
Equipment 



COFFEE GRINDERS 

GRINDMASTER commer- 
cial coffee grinders, 2 avail- 
able. $650/ea. (847) 

487-1641. 




ALL OLD TRAINS AND 
TOYS Lionel, American Flyer 
and other old trains. Also your 
old toys. Private collector pays 
top cash. Be smart, call before 
selling. (847)299-1101. 

COUNTRY BOUTIQUE AN- 
TIQUES (Established since 
1966) Is Interested in buying 
silver, china, paintings, jewel- 
ry, glassware, furniture and 
other old objects of interest. 
(847) 546-^295, 

JUKE BOXES WANTED* 
play 78's, Wurfitzer, will pay up 
to $2,000 on condition (414) 
961-2113. 

PIANOS WANTED, CASH 

paid for most Grand Pianos, 
any condition. Also small 
uprights, in good condition. 
(414)728-2440. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASH I Call 
(830)985-2742. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



AFFORDABLE NEW CON- 
STRUCTION! 3 Large bed- 
rooms, 2.1 baths, vaulted ceil- 
ings, 2.5 car garage and full 
basement. Steps to Waucon- 
da Schools, shops and lake. 
$172,900. Call Ryan & Co. 
(847) 526-0300. 

BEACH PARK FOR SALE 
BY OWNER 3/4 bedroom 
ranch, llvingroom, dining- 
room, wall-to-wall carpet, built- 
in bookcase, C/A, newer fur- 
nace, garage, 24ft. pool with 
deck, well and septic (no waler 
or sewer bills). All on approx- 
imately 1/3 acre. $127,000. 
Open House 11/8, lpm-4pm. 
37085 N. Greenbay. (847) 
623-6803. No realtors please, 

COUNTRY LIVING ENJOY 

peace and tranquility in a 
beautiful, quality 2700sq.lt. 
brick ranch. Features 4-bed- 
rooms, remodeled kitchen, 
sunken livlngroom, 2 fire- 
places. 3 season room, fin- 
ished recroom, first floor laun- 
dry room, new carpeting, 2-1/2 
car garage. At 11127 47th 
Ave.. (414) 694-6472. Re- 
duced to $212,500. 



CRAFT SHOWS! 

ANTIQUES! 

PETS! 



I 



PAGEC-30 



FOUR .BEDROOM, SYR. 

old custom built homo. 2-story 
colonial with covered porch is 
located on .5 acre on quiet cul- 
de-sac In, Lyons Township. 
Low Walworth County taxes; 3 
miles from Burlington and 3 
miles from Hwy. 50. Fireplace, 
deck, A/C. "raised panel; oak 
cabinets, 6-panel doors, living- 
room, famllyroom,- 2.5 baths, 
Insulated and drywalled' 2.5 
car garage, : appliances . and . 
much more. For Sale By Own- 
er. Extraordinary buy at 
.$189,000. About this beautiful 
custom . built - home Open 
House, November 8th, 14th, 
15th, 1pm-4pm. (414) 
763-3935. 

GRAYSLAKE HOME BY 

OWNER Brick and cedar 4- 
bedroom with cedar shingles 
In South Creek Subdivision. 
Fireplace, A/C, landscaped 
and fenced yard with over- 
sized deck. Many upgrades. 4 
blocks from Melra Station. 
$257,000. (847) 648-7282. 

GRAYSLAKE HOME FOR 
SALE BY OWNER, 3-bed- 
room Cape.' Cod, 1st. floor 
laundry facilities, finished 
basement, 3-car garage, new 
wrap around deck. Older 
home, updated. $139,900. 
(847) 223-2483. 

M il l I IM HHMMH I 

IN TOWN ANTtOCH, 

Charming renovated brick 

ranch, 4+ bedrooms, 

2-bathi, master suite 

with double Jacuzzi, 

3-car garage, new 18x33 

swimming pool, 3-blocks 

to Melra Station. 

$194,900, 

Perry Appraisal Service 

(647)638-4424. 

I I I II MW I I I I 1,1111 WWW 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

ADULT COMMUNITY. 

New 1997 

Manufactured home 

1 -bedroom, 1 -bath 

with garage and recroom. 

Includes: washer/dryer, 

stove/refrigerator, 

off street parking. 

$54,900. 

1995 1 -bedroom, 1-bath, 

carport and shed, 

$39,900. 

(847) 526-5000 
leave message. 

JOHNSBURG/SPflfNG 
QROVE WATERFRONT, 

Johnsburg schools, 3-bed- 
rooms, large country kitchen, 
big llvingroom, nice family- 
room, 65ft. pier, fenced yard, 
hardwood, newer carpet, 
newer furnace, central air and 
appliances stay. Must see. 
$125,000. Is the best deal on 
the chain. (847) 497-3408. 

LAKEVIEW OF GAGES 

LAKE in private subdivision. 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, at- 
tached 2-1/2 car garage, large 
family-room, oak kitchen, (ire- 
place, deck overlooking beach 
across street, Woodland and 
Warren schools. $132,000. 
(847) 223-4259. 

MUST SELL. 22056 Sarah 
Dr., Lake Villa. Home on 2 lots. 
Sold in as is condition. 
$70,000. Lawrence Group 
Real Estate Property, (630) 
372-8155. 

NEW CONSTRUCTION 3- 
BEDROOM tri-level In North- 
ern Lake County. Choose own 
colors. Ready soon. $104,900. 
(847) 546-2060. 

NOVEMBER OCCUPANCY 
HEATHER Ridgs/Sloney 
Brook, single family home, 3- 
bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family- 
room, full basement, large 
deck on pond, new siding, lots 
of extras. $164,900. (847) 
680-0651 . 

BY OWNER call for appoint- 
ment. Enjoy a 3-bedroom 
brick home, field stone fire- 
place, appliances, new deck to 
enjoy the wooded yard, wind- 
ing creek, lots of storage and 
access to forest preserve. 
$114,900. (Lake Villa Town- 
Ship). (847) 740-2716. 

POSSIBLY THE BEST 
VALUE IN GRAYSLAKE. 

Recently remodeled, 3-4 bed- 
rooms, 1-bath. tull basement, 
vinyl sided. On Lake Street 
near High School. $112,900. 
|847)223-"1131. 

RANDALL, WISCONSIN 

CEDAR and brick hillside 
ranch, 3500sq.lt., natural light 
cascading thru numerous sky- 
lights, situated on 7.5 heavily 
wooded acres, just north of 
state line off Wilmot Rd., 
$360,000. Call for appoint- 
ment (414) 862-9622. 



FOR SALE BY OWNER 3- 
bedrooms. , . - ;. . 2-baltn, 
1840sq.M, January 1998 new 
construction, 1st floor, faun-" 
dry, everything upgraded.' 140 
13th Ave., Union Grove. (414) 
878-9071;, ' 



WAUCONDA. LOVELY 3- 

BEDROOM, 2-bath home. 
Steps to beach'.- C/A,, deck, 
fenced yard, mature trees and 
2.5 car garage;, $159,900. 
Ryan & Co. (847) 526-0300. 



Wauconda 

Repo 

Nice home, move In only 

$154,800. 

Hurry. Sell last 

Call Liberty Realty 

(630)539-6200 



Round Lake 
Repo 

Beautiful 4 BD Home. 
Hurry. Sell last. 
Call Liberty Realty . 
(630)639-6200 - 



Antloch 
Repo 

2 BD Home. Good 

Condition. Sell Fast 

Call Liberty Realty 

(630)539-6200 



LIbertyville 
Repo 

Big Home. Good 

Condition. Hurry. Sell 

Fast Call Liberty Realty 

(630)539-6200 



Afl-Subs 

REPO'S 

Low down! 

-CALL" 

A company you can trust 

•MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS* 

liberty Re Inc. 

630-539-6200 




2 BDRM CONDO- 

ONLY $66,900- 
NORTH BLUFF AREA 

Cumcr of fit 4| & Rt 137 2 imry 

untl w/2 lull hath NcuinU cmpeird, 

freshly paminJ, iwu wmdnwi. new 

hoi waier hrairr & nx>nr. Crntral 

nil, fircpluLT. Jnk & palm 

Cnuntry club amtninci, [xwrl. 

tennit. sauna £ duhhou&c 

CORNERSTONE 

as4 tur Uremia 

<8J7)872-lSIJffl998 



( om e n m i e ( < it xthv oh: 

COD OX 1/2 ACRE WEST OF 

CiKEEXllAVItOAU!" 

Walk Inside -- you will be 

impreiied. Huge great loom 

w/lofnul dining net, flieptace, 

hrwd flrv vaulted celling 1st III 

Muter bdrm 4. laundry. 1 moie 

bdrms'upsulrv Large screened In 

porch --2 1/2 garage -- fenced 

yard. Reduced to % 1 1 6.900. 

CORNtRSTONE REALTY 

Ask for Brenda 
18471 872-1515/8998 



Just Listed 



Ranch on qulst 

■Mod - ond stroet 

only $100,900 

3 bdrm homo w/M boaomeni 

fmufrad w/lofmty room Noulrol 

ca'pot. oat-ln kilchon. nxkjtocl 

both lovuiy yord •- loncod w/dock 

& Iron Ined Pm-od to Mid'" 

Cdll [Vonda 

CORNERSIONE IHiAllV 

(84 7)872-1515/8908 



Wiyb worth CvkJi IIimik: 

ns ISs nucstll 

Spool art m It* spacious while brick 

fronted pencil on iprowthg acre ol land 

Custom cult 1 bedim. 2 bam homo 

w/waufrod coSrg!, hrwd entry, lit b 

bmty iootl central air & rjjjjj. Mairei 

bam has whirlpool tub. double-bowled 

ink. SCpOraro Shower - at Cciamie:. Ful 

basetnwl - white gkwe dean. 

S2W.CC0 

COtHUSIONt KAUY 
Ask br Bwoq 



^Hoffl«ftr'Side 



500 



t 






Lakewood Realty 

252BO Hwy 32 Lakewood, Wi (715) 27U-7G7G 



NEW CONSTRUCTION WITH LAKE ACCESS- 
LAKEWOOD AREA -We hove available 2 nayrfy con- ' 
structed homes that have never been lived in. They are 
both located on 2 acre parcels, that are wooded wilh oak, 
maple and pines. There Is deeded access to a 90-acre lake 
that Is excellent br swimming and fishing. The homes are 
located In a very privale.area. 
The First Home Is a two bedroom with a Irving room- Uv 
kitchen combo. There is a fireplace In the living room and a 
patio door in the kitchen. Lots of cupboard space and stove 
and refrigerator are Included. There Is a laundry closet In 
the bathroom. The exterior of the home Is 100% mainte- . 
nance free and there Is a 24 x 24 two-stall garage. Asking 
$89,900- Make us an offer. 

The Second Home is a three bedroom, 2 bath home with 
a full basement. The kitchen/living room combination Is 
large. Lots of cupboards and stove and refrigerator are 
included. AH the bedrooms are big and the master bod- 
room is huge with its own master bath. The exterior is 
maintenance free. Also a two-stall 24 x 24 garage. Asking 
$149,900 Make an offer. 

Both homes are well constructed and will be ready for 
you to move Into. Located in the beautiful Nicotet 
National Forest. 






LEGAL/REAL ESTATE 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 31312 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

Citibank, Plaintiff. Case No. 97 C 1414 

VS. Judge Shadur 

Gary N. Utvin, Northern Trust Bank/Lake Forest N A, 
Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR RLE NO. 31312 ( IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED 
PARTIES CONSULT THBR OJMH ATTORNEYS BEFORE 
BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment 
entered in the above entitled cause on Au gust 29. 1997. - 

I, Thomas Johnson and/or Tina Douglas, Special 
Commissioner for this court will on December 02, 1996V at the 
hour of 1:30 p.m. at the front door of Lake County Court House, 
18 N. County St., Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder 
for cash, Ihe following described premises: 
c/k/a 1360 Everett Road. Lake Forest, IL 60045 
Tax IDS 16-07-102-014 

The improvements on the property Consist ol single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

Tne property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The Judgment amount was $247,063.50. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on 
a specified date unless the property is redeemed according to 
taw. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney. 
Fisher and Fisher, 120 North LaSalle. Chicago, Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. lo 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the 
Sales Officer is qoJ required to provide additional information 
other than that set forth in this Notice. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 31537 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwest Mortgage Inc.. A California Corporation, 

Plaintiff, Case No. 97 C 2001 

VS. Judge AJesia 

Kelly W. Devereaux and Patricia D.Devereaux, Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 31537 fIT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED 
PARTIES CONSULT THEIR O W N ATTORNEYS BEFORE 
BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgment 
entered in the above entitled cause on December 2. 1S97 . 

I. Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
November 20. 1998 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at Lake County 
Court House, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for 
cash, Ihe following described premises: 

c/k/a 1 05 E. Aspen Circle, Hainesvillo. IL 60030 
Tax ID fl 06-28-200-023 

The improvements on the property consist ol single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was $171,210:57 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate ol Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on 
a specified dale unless Ihe property is redeemed according to 
law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 120 North LaSalle. Chicago. Illinois. (312)372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. lo 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is DOi required to provide additional information other 
than that set forth in this Notice. 



Everyday Is 

Earth Day. 

Help Keep 

It Clean. 

RECYCLE 




C26 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



504 



Homes For Rent 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 
3-Bodroom in newer 

neighborhood. 
Familyroom dmmgroom 
basement, 2-car garage 
Win consider short term 

ai higher rent 

2-Bodroom Doll House 

Ready lo rent You'll love (he 

tree house room 

Come and see 

S725/monlh 

ALANWOOD ASSOCIATES 

(847) 223 1141 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 
Large 3-bedroom. eat-in kiich 
en, livingroom. l3milyioom. 
new bathroom, new pamt and 
carpeting, fenced back yard, 
C/A, $915/month (847) 
973 1303 

TWIN LAKES DUPLEX. 3 
bedrooms. 2-baths, 2-car ga- 
rage, finished basement, ap- 
pliances included. 
$925/monlh (414)510-9663 



514 



CondVlcw] Homes 



AVAILABLE IMMEDIATE- 
LY. NEWLY remodeled 2- 
bedroom. in Fox Lake. All utili- 
ties and appliances included, 
S800/month. (B47) 740-8275, 
pager (847] 339-4294. 

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATE- 
LY RECENTLY remodeled 
2-bedroom in unincorporated 
Lake County near Grays'ake 
Appliances and lake nghts in- 
cluded SSOO/monlh (847) 
740-8275. pager (847) 339- 
4294 

COUNTRY HOME 2 miles 
west ol 1-94 >n Bnsioi Gas 
heat, spacious yard, attached 
garage NO PETS (414) 
657-2676 

GAGES LAKE 3-BED- 
ROOM duplex, new carpet 
ing. C/A, S850-monlh, lyr 
lease, security required no 
pets Immediate occupancy 
(847) 223-6453 

GRAYSLAKE HOME 4- 
BEDROOMS. 2 12 bains 
lull basement, fenced yard 
walor view Sl.l95.monlh 
(847] 223 64t8 after 5pm 

MARENGO NEW CON- 
STRUCTION. Available now 
2 bedroom i I 2 bath toll 
casement and 2 ca' garage 
1 s! floor laondn/room No pels 
S8i>5 month (815(568 63' 1 

MUNDELEIN NEWER 4- 
BEDROOM colonial 2 i 2 
tiijllii l.imilyrotir" basement 
u -u| d"'" OK Si 800 mo'il': 
(ftf* 634 83' i ever 
. j', wnokends 

ROUND LAKE 2-BED- 

ROOM .* -v garage first 
•■■ ■..> ..' i> S?50 mtw'ffi 
.'. . .,: i- '""•i>dia!oly iflJ? 
. ■aivfc 



ROUND LAKE 2-8ED- 

ROOM 'I. .jse. ava-ijine im 

rrvfOialt- k Np pi'lS 

Sroo (WW S700 secufiy a,- 
pesti S.?nO w.iipr deposit CM 
fye> v;b t"-y (84' 

680 "■'•: 



: Etery-.c"* '■ " Mia . 

' ' S'-"A ^ase'~»^ ^ ' , 

t-,n HI ».- '.- A" :,'" ■«•• 

SS50 "^ntn 

A^AMVOOD ASSOOATFS 

.84 7 223 J Mr 



Time Share rtj Minnesota. 
O'lober G'Ciil feteffi muSl 
^11 [847i543 1349 

WAUCONOA 460 N. Mam 
Si . 2-bedroom, 2-baih, 
S750/month, one month se- 
curity (708) 424 0566 



518 



1 



Mobile Ilium 



TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN 3-bedroom house with 
garage, quiet subdivision, 
near school and beach, no 
pels S995/month (414) 
537 4034 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN 3- room house lor rani, 
with basement for storage, 
quiet, sale area, school, 
church and stores near by, 
$45G/monm, $450 security, 
2yr. lease. Available 12/1/98 
Contact (708) 795-0055 

VACATION VILLAGE 

Studio, $430/monih 

i -bedroom, $575/month. 

2-bedroom. $750/monlh. 

REMAX HNW 

Floyd Edwards. 

(847) 438-6200. 

WAUCONDA 3-BEDROOM 
HOME, 2-car attached ga- 
rage, nice lot, $1,050/month. 
(847) 356-0283. 

ZION 3+BEDROOMS, 

BASEMENT, fenced yard, 2- 
car garage, $825/month. 
(847) 662-6669. 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartmenl For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



November 6, 1998 ?■ J ' 



ANTIOCH GOLF COURSE 
TOWNHOUSE, 2-bed- 
rooms, 2 5 bath, fireplace. 
wetbar, 2+car garage. Very 
nice Sl.lOO/month plus secur- 
ity. (847) 356-0222, (847) 
356-2302, 

FOX LAKE 2-BEDROOM, 

i-bath, t-t/2 car garage, fire- 
place, washer/dryer, 4 -blocks 
lo train, on beautiful Mmeola 
Bay Pool, tennis courts, 
beach, launch ramps. No pots 
Available December 1st 
S775/monlh (630) 983 8722 
after 6pm 

FOX LAKE WATERFRONT 

TOWNHOME FOR SALE BY 
OWNER, Woodhiiis Bay Colo- 
ny. Mmeota Boy, 2-bedroom. 
1-1/2 bath, garage, pool, club 
house, lenms cou'ts. boat 
launching and storage Walk 
to lra<n $115,900 (847) 705 
78 00 anytime 

GURNEE 2-BEDROOM. 2- 
BATH, 5lh floor, large balco- 
ny, large counteriops and cab- 
inets Beautiful Heather 
Ridge Indoor parking, golf, 
tenms and many more ameni- 
ties $94,500 (84 7) 
816 6420 

GURNEE TOWNHOUSE 

FOR RENT, end unit. Wood 
land Hills new section beaud- 
fui view private pafio laces 
woods 2 bedroom • toft i 
i 2 baitis. famifyroom -dining 
room AC 2 ' 2 car garage 
■iput'al decor appwvui's 
w'XJOA treatments (le»'tHo 
51 175 month Av.iMble [>e 
lember 1st |8ISi5J2 -109-t 

GURNEE. 2 BEDROOM 2 
'2 batn fireplace -mmai u 
late lowrinoust' with aiuichcd 
)d>itt)C Very riua' (0 Su^htte 

Miiis and (oiiway Tailing appli 
i.it'or's available m Unw<" 
h<" S'250 00 plus fust monln 
Security No pots or smoking 
Can >847| 856 1109 ii'.ivt- 
message 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3 
ut-d'oom lownhouse ai 
tacfted garage 1 1 2 bains. 
C A drepiaco ait appliances. 
S675 montft No Section 8 
AvA'iab'e November 15m 
647, 265 1006 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 2- 
BEDROOM TOWNHOME 

a.;i aftie •"neoiatt'iy 'ire- 
;.<i'. l- CA pool maintenance 
free $775montf> <e4 7| 

223 2253 



LAKE VILLA SUBLET WA- 
TERS EDGE 2-bedroom, 

washer/dryer in apartment, 
handicap access. Available 
November T51h. thru May "99 
S825/month plus t month de- 
posit. Pels OK. (847) 
265-8520 



LAKEVIEW TERRACE 

APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA. Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$6i0-$745/monlh Heal, wa- 
ter, air included. (847) 
356 5474 



SILVER LAKE. WISCON- 
SIN 2-bodroom. upper apart- 
ment across Irom park and 
Peach All appliances, air, car 
pel. $S90/month plus security 
deposit and credit check re 
quired No pels Available im 
mediated (414)889 4266 



FOX LAKE 1-BEDROOM 
apartment. Newly redecorat- 
ed. Appliances included. Pri- 
vate off street parking. Avail- 
able immediately. (734) 
946-7851. __ 

FOX LAKE VACATION VIL- 
LAGE Largo 1 -bedroom, 
newly remodeled apartment 
Security entrance, laundry 
lacihlios, swimming, tennis, 
boat docks, walking trails. NO 
PETS $550/monlh. (847) 
223 1131^ 

GURNEE/WAUKEGAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Affordablo Pncos 

Spacious 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Sito Staff 

Good Location 

Easy to Toll Roads 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR 

(847) 244-9222. 



STUDIO APARTMENT IN 
VACATION VILLAGE, full 
kilchen and bath. $450/monlrt 
plus utilities. Ooposlt required. 
Avolloblo 11/1/98. Call Don 
(630) 964-0402. 

ZION CLEAN 3-BED- 
ROOM HOME , 1-1/2 bath, 
yard, good area, appliances, 
washer/dryer, frnlshod base- 
ment, $750 plus utilities. Non- 
smoking. (414)634-9387. 



Lqqkihg'forpentkl 

\'::/pnperty^'^! : . 

Lakeland's 320 

section is the place 

to findwhafyqu're 

looking for! '"'■; 



^RICHMOND CAR 
LOT or, YOUR 
BUSINESS USE 

Brick bldg on Rt. 12, 

1 bay, office, garage & 

sales lot. Excellent 

visibility. Alternate 

use OK. $795/mo. 

Land Mgint 
815-678-4334 



540 



Investment Property 



OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 
Quaffied Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

I&2 Bedroom Apartmenis Available. 

Smp in or 

299 Oakridge Court In Antioch 

Ot call: 

847-395-4840 
fC> 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

' ■ Mjnipri] by Men Jun Group, Inc. 



GRAY/LXKE 

Center Street i 
Apartments 
2 Bedroon 
Apartment i 
With patio/balcony j 
Utilities included 

847-395-0949 j 

1 



SPRING QROVE 4-UNU 
apartment building, 3.5 + acr- 
es. Gross $27,500, possible 
subdivide, $249,000. (847) 
587-5398. 



544 


Mortgage Services 



NO DOWNPAVMENT? 

PROBLEM CREDIT? Own 
the home you need now. with- 
out a big downpaymenL Com- 
plete financing If qualified. De- 
George Home Alliance 1-800- 

343-28R4 



LAltEwood ViLUqE Apartments 

In liLtNd LaUi Arid CiuyslAkc 

OltfKIM, Afl(iH<UI(lt llOUSJM, loll UUAJilild Aflplif ANI<. 

Miiv A((»f>ii(M(, Aftplii Allows fon ouh: 

* I,?, **(! } IlltflltHMt \()MU*liW\ 

Ci'tiHimly AvAiUbh W Ishnd IaIh 
• / bnliuxm W%\\kMii 

I'll AM 1 ',11 lllll Willi IflllJIIM-MION Oil 4|l|KjiNIMIM AI: 

(111/) />J.f.M-1 lt)i)n (H(X)) V76-01W4 

|4L(U,1M»I ViIIm.i Ajuimsii m l\ |)l«]li ','.li!\.-,IU 
HAPI«|I() llV MlllilllAN tilKllp, Kh . 



WESTWIND 

VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zion 
1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances • On-Site 

Manager • No Pets 

Starting from 

$495/mo. 

Call Martha & Isaac 

(847) 746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 




jit tractive 0p art men I /j r imi' 



BEAUTY GLOVES 

100% -Cotton- white. 

Protect days, beautify nights. 

Includes beauty tips and gift. 

2/pr7S5.00. 

P. West, 

P.O. Box 549. 

Fox Lake, III. 60020. 

DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR *7B OR LESS? 

Place your ad In this section 

for ooty $3.00 for 10 words or 

less. Must be prepaid. 

Call Lisa (847) 223-8161 

ext. 140 or send the ad with 

with your payment to: 

Lakeland Publishers. 

P. O. Box 268, 
30 S. Whitney St.. 
Graystake tit. 80030. ' 
Atten:Usa. 



.•/In I inch Manor 

445 Donin Dr. 

Antioch, IL 60002 

395-0949 



MOBILE HOME 12X48, 

newly decorated, stored m Elk- 
horn. Wise Must sell $3,900 
|7QS) 453 5946 

MOBILE HOME 28X70. 
1 ,90050 ft.. 3-bedrooms. 3-luil 
balhs. jacui2i lub. natural tire- 
place. C.'A, formal dining, new 
root and largo lot AH applianc- 
es included. $45,000 (414) 
537 3546 

MODULARS - DOU- 

BLEWIDES • SINGLEWIDES 
ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES 
FOUNDATIONS, BASE- 

MENTS. GARAGES. SEPT- 
1CS - WE DO IT ALU 1 FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800 
798-1541 

PARK CITY 1988 3-bed- 
room. 2-bath. 80ft long, 
SI 7.500 (847) 356-7018 

RELOCATING MUST 
SELL NOW! 2-bedroom mo- 
bile home. Newly remodelod 
New Hoora and carpel, new 
windows and furnace 10x15 
shed. 14x8 screon porch, car- 
port, stove, refrigerator, air 
conditioner, 510,500/bost 
1847) 710-2263 

RURAL GRAYSLAKE 

Cute home, country park. 

2-bedroom, i-bath - $17,000 

Bright New Homes 

$36. 500-S4 1.000. 

Chain O'Lakes Mobile Homes 

Rt. 120&Falr1ieldRd. 

SPACtOUS 1991 . PARK- 
WOOD 26x66, 3-bedrooms, 
2-baths, 2 sets patio doors to 
large deck, sunroom, fire- 
place, central air, skylights 
and garage. Must see. Price 
greatly reduced. $82,900 Wa- 
terlord. (414)514-2530. 




( Dcep f^gkejiermilage |g@ |J vacant uji/Actc^e 



H9 Milwaukee Ave. 
Lake Villa, IL 60046 

356-2002 



iV-fV*'^ 



5$575S 



On-Sitc Management & Maintenance 
Personnel 
All Amenities 
Uiuiulry Facilities In Each Building, 
Attractive I^uulscapcd Grounds ^ ^" 
Mctra Station Nearhv 




Equal Houtlng 
Opportunities 



LAKEFRONT , PROPERTY 
1-ACRE, perc tested, aand 
beach, laige oak trees, Lily 
Lake, Wisconsin. $85,000. 
(414)857-665Z 

MCHEHRV/HARTIN 
WOODS, HEAVILY wooded 
1 acre on cul-de-sac. (815) 
344-4269. 

SPRING GROVE OUT- 
STANDING bulldable 1-1/2 
acres In Orchard Bluff Estates 
Subdivision. Make otlor. Li- 
censed RE owner. For more 
information call (630) 
213-8776. _ 



528 



Apiyilnim'S 
T<> Share 



534 



Bu&mess pfoperty 

Fur Salu 



MCHENRY HOME with fur 
nished room, includes uiilmos. 
washer/dryer and stor 
SlOO/week (815) 363 8458 




■ Business Property 
For Item 



564 



Resort/Vacation 
Rentals 



] 



530 



Hewim r'or Kent 



FULL SERVICE SHOE RE- 
PAIR SHOP. Turnkey oper- 
ation including all equipmonl 
and tnvoniory Appraised 
value $45,000 Musi soil quick- 
ly 515.000/bosi (8471 ?fv». 



ROOM FOR RENT in large 4 
bedroom home, in Lake Villa, 
otl 59 & Grand. $350/month 
(8471973-0128 



SEMI-FURNISHED 
QUIET, clean, convenient 
$200 lo move. S70/wk (B47) 
360-9568 




CONDOMINIUMS 

■ Modwn Vwy ArkK»f» bAJng 
■ ftw* Uktt Qtax** 
• hontf Of Porttrg 

pwjiicc • iocaiioi • mat 



$ 



124,000 




MOLINl, IL-Dcnlal 
Practice Fitr Sale by 
Owner. Cross $200K 
annually, fa rms. Under 
$800/rno. Brand new 
cquml, Panorex barely 
used, 2 operalnrys, 1 
lab, business ofc, wailing 
rm. Newly dee, modern 
bldg, ground floor, cue 
lor. Total pkg$130K 
firm; $2QJ( down ncg. 
000 active prosthetic 
patients ThU k a general 

prac|icfi. Seeing is 

bclie\ ing! This^rnss on 

l'2tirs/wk. Tax statements 

will he provided. 

309.7fc2.(i93b 



538 



Iluslness Prupcrty 
Fur Hen! 



COMMERCIAL PROPER- 
TY OFFICE ond shop space. 
1/2 lo 2 acros ot outdoor sior- 
uqo. Mundololn/Vornon Hills 
oroa. Ideal (or contractor stor- 
age. (847) 948-1500, 



FOX LAKE AREA Small of- 
lice with good parking, in good 
locaiion on Rt. 12. 
&300/mon1h. (8471 587-3193- 



INDUSTRIAL BUILDING 

ROUND Lake , 806 Sunset, 
3.000- 12,000sq.r(.. $5.00 sq.fl. 
(847) 223-0022. 



Olllco tor Rent locatsd in 
Rollins Road Shopping Con- 
ler. Round Lake Boaclt, newly 
pamiod and carpeted. (847) 
223 ^t 900 



OFFICE SPACE FOR 
RENT North Chicago, 
1400sq.fl. For mora Informa- 
tion please call (847) 
576-9811 



SILVER LAKE, WISCON- 
SIN, 1800sq.fi. unit with 4 of- 
fices. (414) 843-3705. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
7l3sq.fl, work srtop and oMice. 
with overhead garage door, 
zoned Industrial, Includes 
sewer and water. $395/month 
plus security. Available Imme- 
diately. Days (847) 
528-5000. evenings (847) 
526-0420 leave message 



ESCAPE TO S.W. FLORI- 
DA CAPE CORAL, 2-bed- 
room. 2-bath, pool, channel 
Iront, direct access to Gulf. 
Mature applicants preferred. 
(847) 223-0775. 

WEEK IN ORLANDO Near 
Disney. 2-bedroom resort, 
kilchen, washer/dryer. 2- 
baths, 5850/besl. (847) 

543-4243. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you linvc placed classified 
advertising wllh (tie Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another (Inn request 
Ing payment for tills advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred 
it lo your account, all pay 
menls for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspaper* 

PO Do* 368 

30 8. Whitney St. 

QmysUko. U 60030-0368 



568 



)ul Of Area Property 



568 



Out Of Area 




Michigan 

C«C* FAJfcWW ACMJ.; , V 

vooofobfo a Produco sol up. 
Muck & tanoy sol 260 coos tto. 

[Joined- 100 slZO tomporaturo 

confrciod Wdohousa Throe 

mkn Ol rood (ronloao. Priced la 

larmma ot: Only 5W1000. ■ 

517-615-2654 Of 1 -BOO- 531 -6605 



fUyward Wisconsin 

Kennel .'yv^' 

For the real dog loverl 

Well established 20 run 

boarding kennei. .. 

w/groomlng facility. 

Bejutlful 4 br, 2 ba home 

on 5 acres. Marry extras. 

Turnkey business, will 

train for easy transition, 

perfect for the stay at 

home spouse. Serious 

calls only $275,000. 

715-462-3037. 



Ogle County IL 
For Sale 

By owner. 40 sores. 

Beaut mature woods 

w/szbsL horns site, 

running spring water, 

oiceL hunting 
In secluded srea with- 
in 4 miles of Whits 
Pines Stat. Forest, 
priced to selL 

815-284-6733 

or leave mag. 



I 



6. IN 

InduttrlaJ/Comnercial 

laud h buildings' for 

luHornls. tfvbliHlll 

Power Plant Site loctitd on 

tie letftrnm/CIark 

Comity line In S. IN. 

54,000 »q. IL rtorige baUdlng, 

clflcs tpaca, muniactiuiDg 

proMiilng bufldlnfi. large 

tract* of nndsTBloped land 

camntJy uaed besvy 

lndtutrlaL Contact 

Mlcbjua) iombort 

50243 WJ253 or 

DebnleFord 

81M7WM 

for more IdIo. 



III M I I M l ■' 

IMorthern California 
Coastal Conunonity 

For sale by owner 

Country Restaurant 

Bucolic, Beautiful. 

beloved Country 

Restaurant in small N. 

CA. community. 

Tremendous business 

oppty. for passionate. 

discerning chef/owner 

who cares for organic 

seasonal cuisine, nurtu- 

rancc, community & 

quality of life: 

707-882-3286 



SO. COLORADO RANCH. 
53 acres - $32,900. Bring your 
horses and ride out to one of 
the last groat ranches In CO. 
Nice fields with outstanding 
Rocky Mtn views. Yr. round ac- 
cess, tol/elec. Excellent financ- 
ing. Call now 719-676-6387 
Hatchet Ranch. 



ILLINOIS (Central) 

(Qhlsp€*lHQ "pint*. 

BOfl.ic development sdj. 
K ickapoo Stutc Park, loe'd nenr 
Danville, IL. Becoming known 
throughout Ihe Midwest as I of 
(he most unique reec real ion nl & 
retirement artu in the US This 
development offers wooded lots 
that are Sac. some wilh their own 
pvi slocked pond, others silualed 
on 1 lo -l|i vi lakes, exclusive to 
our clients only. Unique oppty 
tar those who are looking for a 
wknd relreal or a onc*-in-a-!ife- 
lime retirement oppty. Imagine 
fishing in your backyard or hik- 
ing into a beauliful adj. slate 
park, or un evening stroll down 

Wandering Foreil Road. 

Whispering Pines otTers this & 

so much more. We alio offer 

consultation on construction 

& local finc'g. Let us make your 

dreams come true, 

Call for appt & allow us lo 

accommodate you as our guest 

for Ihe night in a comfortable 

executive suite. 

For more Info call 

800.668-0655 
217-497-8733 

e-mail 
wesltnkedanvilte.net 



November 6, 1998 



, i ■ 



CLASSIFIED 



■H " * 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 



€27/ 



568 



OutOfArcaPropert) 



j COLORADO i 

11,1 10 ACRES If* WILD CO; J 

COLORADO. ••". ■; '.- * . 

}9S00wnt h CRP, I'M iSWid, hUl J 

• h p.ww.fl 00,000 mvwi ixtow. I 

; Ouckf.hu J2KUXt*oj. CmMbc j 

iMAd hw win punk, 

GJOmi .■■'■■■ ; 15 
I (00 74 J MM 
<••*••■•■■•* iHiHtMMHHHMi 

ISGONSBN 1 

2 RIAL ISTATE IS SniLTHt BEST .J 

J INVl5TMINTTHt« ISI J 

J Norrnin Rockwell coumry living In J 

J Ihii I fcb « property. RtJtwwt J000 i 

i . u oltf iJrm houte wMccIc 4 bf, J 

J J In 75 mlW. ofMidlmn. U50K J 

J fjll Drbm/Crri* * Awod*to * 

; 4r-R.TS4.28lJ J 



ARIZONA 
BEST BUY! 



BoauiltLiI historic ranch property 

in scctnlc NW Ariz. Private 40 

sera ranch parcels now available 

Iron only £395/ac! Near 

Colorado Rivor, llshlnrj, boating, 

gambling, siunrsirtg sunsets & 

min views. Prlatino, lush high 

desert covered with aaguaros. 

yuccas, polo vordes, Joshuas. No 

guol. low down, xin! terms. 100% 

wnier/minerDJ rights. Title 

insured, surveyed, good access. 

Soiling Fas" Musi see. 

Open dairy. 

STAGECOACH TRAJUS 
1-800-711-2340 



S........ 



tl l ti ll » t ll MH I»M ! »■•« M »t 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1989 TRAVEL TRAILER 
CAMPER, 16ft.. fully loaded, 
fiberglass outside, A/C, hoat, 
Irldgo, TV, propane/electric 
compatable. Bathroom with 
shower. Only sleeps 2. MUST 
SEEII $2,300. (847) 265-0203. 

TRUCK CAP, FULL size, 
$600. 1972 Steury camper, 
sleeps 8, $650. 1982 Gold- 
wing motorcycle. $2,800. 
(847) 740-4930. 



708 



SnowmobUes/ATVs 



1996 PHAZER II, $2,500. 
1996 Phazer II LE, $2,500. 
1994 Polaris Storm, '96 cylin- 
ders, $2,700 or best. (847) 
356-2015 

1996 POLARIS STORM. 
1985 Skl-Doo Formula SS 
Both in excellent condition. 
(4 f4) 643-3436. "" f ''"•"'• 

SNOWMOBILE 1097 YA- 
MAHA 700 Triple Venters, 
only 232 miles. Used 1 sea- 
son, brand new 2 place trailer, 
$9,000 Invested, $8,900/best. 
(847) 548-0556, 

SNOWMOBILES 1990 

INDY 650; 19BB 500 Phazer. 
Both In great shape, 
$3,200/both. Will separate. 
(847)497-4466. 




1967 20FT. RIVIERA PON- 
TOON, 60hp Johnson motor, 
new deck and carpet, no trail- 
er. Best offer, (647) 356-0849. 

1989 WE LLC RAFT 
CUDDY CABIN, low hours, Al- 
pine Stereo System. Mini Con- 
dition. $8,000. Must see to ap- 
preciate. Pager (847) 216- 
2172. 

1995 PINKER CAPTIVA 
232 CUDDY With 454, low 
hours, excellent condition, 
(615) 385-8468. 

1998 LUND 16FT. Rebel, 
30hp Merc, Shorelandar trail- 
er, front and rear trolling mo- 
tors, all electronics included, 
$a,000/best. (847) 265-9497, 
(847) 370-9325. 

BOAT AND MOTOR 1973 

Glaslron tri-hull, nice shape, 
1978 Evinrude 135hp, rebuilt 
in 1993, tow hours, 
$2,500/best. (847) 265-0547. 



720 


Sports Equipment 



720 



■ Sports Equipment 



HEALTHHIDER, LIKE 

NEW, $400/best. Aluminum 

topper for 6lt box, $75/firm. 

;' (647)SS7-5S62^nerSpm.' ■ 

NORDIC TRAC EXCELL 

MODEL,: almost new, paid 
$550, 'best offer. •' (847) 
548-5593/ , - , 



804 


Can for Sale 



1997 KS KAWASAKI PRO 

CIRCUIT 125, $3,800/best. 
(847) 356-5949. 

AEROBIC RIDER EXER- 
CISE MACHINE WITH ris- 
er, excellent condition, like 
new. Original $300, best offer. 
(847) 973-0473 after 6pm. 

BIKE TRAILER, BURLEY, 

seats 2, $175. Nordic Track, 
$150. For more Information 
call (414) 694-0351. 

EXERCISE WEIGHT MA- 
CHINE Health Club without 
leaving home, 6 station weight 
machine with 4 weight stacks, 
heavy duty Pro Model with ex- 
tras. Over $5,000 value. A 
steal at $1,500. (847) 
436-4430. 



$100-S50Q CARS 

Police Impounds, 

Honda's, Chevy's, 

Jeep's and Sport Utilities, 

. MustSelll 

1-BOO-522.2730 

6x12292, 

1980 CHEVY IMPALA, 
good body, engine rebuilt, 
mags, comes with extra tires,' 
now exhaust, $900. 1978 
Jeep, va engine, comes with 
throo tops, $500. (847) 
566-4195 after 3pm. 

1988 MUSTANG LX, 8.0. 5- 
speed, hatchback, good con- 
dition, runs good, $1,700. 
(B47) B56-1338. 

1991 BUICK PARK AVE. 
Good condition, white with 
burgandy Interior. $5,400 
(847) 075-3799. 

1992 CORVETTE CON- 
VERTIBLE white with white 
top, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815) 365-6468. 

CHEVY 1993 BERETTA 2- 

door, V6 automatic, air. load- 
ed, new tires, extra clean, 
$4,695/rxrSl (847) 638-5369. 

BUICK 1978 SKYLARK, 
V6, low mileage, excellent run- 
ner, $595/beat. (414) 
652-4910. 

BUICK 1993 LESABRE, 
$5.990. (847) 223-8651. 

BUICK 1998 CENTURY 
LTD. Knauz price, $19,999. 
(847) 234-2600. 

BUICK 1998 PARK AVE- 
NUE. Knauz Price $26,999. 
(847) 234-2800. 

BUICK 1999 LESABRE 
CUSTOM. Knauz $21,999. 
(847) 234-2800 

CARS S100-SSOO POLICE 
Impounds 1980'3-1997's Hon- 
das, Chevys, Jeeps and Sport 
Utility. Must soil. 800-772- 
7470 oxt. 7040. (SCA Net- 
work). 

CARS FOR $1O6-$5O0. Po- 
lice Impounds, repos, tax sei- 
zures. Sold locally this month. 
Imports, Domestics, 4x4's, 
motorcycles, computers, ster- 
eos and more. Call now 1 -800- 
290-2262 X4987. (SCA Net- 
work) 

CHEVROLET 1987 

MONTE CARLO SS, T-tops, 
air, am/fm stereo, brand new 
tires and exhaust, excellent 
condition. 97,000 miles, 
$3,500/best. (414) 694-9870. 

CHEVY 1980 CORVETTE, 

while, excellent condition, 
65,000 miles. (815) 

675-3110. 

CHEVY 1984 CORVETTE, 
$8,995,(847)223-8651. 

CHEVY 1989 RS CAMARO, 
T-tops, automatic transmis- 
sion, new tires, new exhaust 
system, new brakes. Must sell. 
$4.000/flrm. (847) 473-9656, 
(847) 816-6963 evenings. 

CHEVY 1991 CORSICA 

LT. $5,595. (847) 623-7676. 

CHEVY 1994 CORVETTE, 
$23.995. (847) 362-2683. 

CHEVY 1997 LUMINA, 4- 

door, white, maroon interior, 
fully loaded, low miles, A/C. ex- 
cellent condition. Must sell. 
Asking $15,5Q0/best. Please 
call (847)223-3161 after 5pm 
or leave message. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 

Bodies, Factory-new guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. Doors 
from $89.00 Fenders from 
$50.00 Beds from $800.00, 
Bedliners $169.00. Bumpers, 
Grills Repart Panels, Paints, 
Abrasives, windshields, radia- 
tors, Delivery, Marx (217) 624- 
6184. 



CHRYSLER 


1998 


CON. 


CORDE LX, 


Knauz 


Price 


$21,999. (847) 


234-2800 




CHHYSLER 


1998 


SB 


BRING CONVERTIBLE 


' JXI 


Knauz Price 


$23,989. 


(847 


234-2800. 







804 



Cars for Sale 



804 


.Cars For Sale, 




CHRYSLER 1990 CIRRUS 
Ul, Knauz- price $17,099. 
(847) 234-2800.,; : " : . ' 

CONTOUR ■' OLvlOSB, 
$11,795. (847) 336-2340, V 

DODGE 1991 STEALTH. 

Headtumer, Runs perfect, au- 
tomatic, ,87K, must see. 
$5,900. Please call (847) 
249-1867, ■■• . . . jfe 

DODGE 1992' COLT, Stock 
'07.6544, $995. (847) 587- 
6473. - 

EAGLE TALON ESI 1995, 5- 
speed manual, 40K, A/C, 
AM/FM cassette, power steer- 
ing, excellent condition, 
$9,000. (847) 356-6695 be- 
fore 7pm. ■', 

FOR SALE $14,000." 1997 
GOLFK2 (Umlted Edition) 
17,000 miles. Golf K2 
Limited Edition Package: 
VW roof rack & carrier 
system. Roof mounted 
whip antenna, Deluxe 
Siesta wheelcovers. 
Power mirrors, with defog 
feature: front fog lights 
'Spirit" cloth seal uphol- 
story, custom carpet floor- 
mate, Instrument gauges 
with ollvor-whlto faces. 
Hestabls front teste and 
windshield washer noz- 
zles. Premium am/fm cas- 
sette stereo radio. Power 
Glass sunroof, tilt and 
side with sun shade, A/C, 
CFC free, S-epeed over- 
drive manual transmis- 
sion, tornado red paint, 
anthracite Spirit woven 
cloth. Original price 
$16,225. Call Scott (847) 
244-9569 after 6pm or E- 
mall CSP63@MEGSI- 
NET.NET. 

FOR SALE 1B86 SILVER 
MOONLIGHT OLDS CUT- 
LASS SIERRA, A/C, heat, 
power locks, new tires, new 
brakes, new exhaust, new ra- 
diator, new cam shaft. Runs 
great. Son left for Navy. Must 
sell. $1,800 price negotiable. 
(414) 654-6543 leave mes- 
sage 

FORD 1968 MUSTANG, 

plenty of good parts or as 
whole. Make offer. (847) 
623-4505. 

FORD 1991 TEMPO. SON., 
Stock *'# 10-8697, $2,995. 
(847) 587-6473. 

FORD 1691 THUNDER- 
BIRD, $6,395. (847) 623- 
7676. 

FORD 1993 TAURUS GL, 

$4,995. (647) 395-3600. 

FOHD 1993 TAURUS SHO, 
$3,2O0/best, (847) 740-8216, 

FORD 1994 EXPLORER 
LTD, all power features, 
moonroof, alloy wheels, leath- 
er seats, excellent condition, 
$15,000/besl. (847) 
680-7536. 

FORD 1994 THUNDER- 
BIRD V6, 42.000K, climate 
control, fully loaded, new 
tires, $7,200/best. (847) 
740-6564 after 5pm. 

FORD 1996 MUSTANG 
GT CONVERTIBLE wllh roll- 
bar, Laser Rod, 8,500 miles, 
asking $18,750. (847) 
856-1902 evenings. 

FORD 1997 TAURUS GL, 

$11.995. (847) 336-2340. 

FORD 1998 TAURUS SE, 

$13.995. (647) 336-2340. 

FORD ESCORT 1992, 4- 

door sedan, good mechanical 
condition, needs some paint, 
silver, runs great, new tires 
and brakes. $2,500. (847) 
543-1936. 

FORD FAIRMONT, 19B0. 

Runs good. Some rust. New 
tires and battery. $425/besl. 
(847)360-0633 



HONDA 1996 ACCORD LX 
SEDAN. $14,495. (847) 362- 
2683. 



GEO PRIZM 1994, $6,695. 

(647) 362-2683. 

GOOD CAR FOR SALE 
1989 Mercury Cougar. V6, 
loaded, brown with tan interi- 
or, clean, runs well, $2,500. 
Call Karie (B15) 363-0054 
evenings. 

HONDA 1991 CIVIC WAG- 
ON, automatic, air, cassette, 
luggage rack, 1 -owner, 
$3,200/best. (B47) 740-7569, 

HONDA 1993 ACCORD 
LX. $9,995. (847) 395-3600. 

HONDA 1995 ACCORD, 

V6, loaded, leather, sunroof, 
CD player, spoiler 

$15.000/best. (047) 

355-5494. 



HONDA 1996 CIVIC DX 
COUPE, black, original owner, 
! excellent \ condition,/. air, 5- 
epeed.V CD player, ,'$9,500. 
(847)573-0693. ;>■ 

HONDA 1996 CIVIC EX, 
$10,495,(847)336-2340. 

HONDA ,1997 CIVIC EX, 2- 

door,. low mileage, warranty, 
$1 3,500. (414) 942-0536. - 

HONDA ACCORD LX 1968, 
1 -owner, 4-door, automatic 
everything. Blue book price 
$4,200, asking $3,700. (847) 
546-8981. 

HONDA CIVIC 1996, 
$8,995, (847) 362-2683. 

HONDA CMC, 1995, 'Car- 
olina* Car. 48,000 miles, au- 
tomatic transmission, A/C, 
Viper alarm. $9,500 or best 
offer. Call (847) 473-8650 
Ext. S712A. 

HYUNDAI ACCENT 1995 
$5,995. (847) 587-3300. 

HYUNDAI EXCEL 1994, 
63,000 miles, manual trans- 
mission. Asking $2,200. (847) 
548-0607. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, If 

you are having a Garage 

Sale or If you have a 

house to sell or apartment 

to rent 

Cell Lisa before 10am 

Wednesday to place 

your ad hare. 

(847) 223-6181 

ext 140. 

MERCEDES 1977 300 DIE- 
SEL, automatic, low miles, 
$2,689/best. (414) 859-2631. 

MERCURY 1994 COUGAR 
XR7, $7,995. (847) 587-3300. 

MERCURY 1994 TOPAZ, 
Stock #10-6712, $4,995. (B47) 
587-6473. 

MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL 1997 Black Pon- 
tiac Sunfire, 5-speed, 2-door 
sedan, A/C, cassette. Asking 
$9,900. (847) 438-4180. 

NISSAN 1998 SENTRA XE, 
$10,995. (847) 336-2340. 

NISSAN SENTRA 1985, no 
rust L 4-door, .5-speed, A/C, 
am/fm cassette,, .4 now tires, 
$i.7O0: Dan (847) 550^8049. ' 

OLDS 1981 : REGENCY, 

good runner, $800/best. (414) 

062-2037. 

OLDS 1989 CALAIS, Slock 
#106728, $3,995. (847) 587- 
6473. 

OLDS 1994 CUTLASS 

CONVERTIBLE, $11,995. 
(647) 336-2340. 

OLDSMOBILE 1984 CUT- 
LASS SUPREME 231, blue, 
4-door. V6 engine, excellent 
runner, dependable work vehi- 
cle. $650 price negotiable. Call 
after 6pm, (414) 654-6543 ask 
for Mr. Coleman. 

PLYMOUTH 1991 LASER, 

Stock #3-6283, $3,995. (847) 
587-6473. 

PLYMOUTH 1995 NEON 

HIGHLINE, $5,995. (847) 623- 
7676. 

PLYMOUTH 1699 NEON, 

Knauz Price $12,999. (847) 
234-2800. 

PONTIAC 1987 GRAND 

AM, 4-cyllnder, extremely low 
miles, very clean, $1,900. 
(414) 658-0777. 

PONTIAC 199B SUNFIRE, 
$9.995. (847) 395-3600. 

SATURN 1996 4-DOOR 
Sedan, 5-speed, air, low 
miles. 1 -owner, excellent con- ■ 
dition, $8,900/besl. (847) 
548-2356. 

SATURN SL2, 1994, 

$7,895, (847) 362-2683. 

SATURN SLI 1994, $5,990. 
(847) 223-8651. 

SHARP 1989 VW CABRIO- 
LET blue convertible, au- 
tomatic, air, power steering, 
power brakes, stereo, $3,500. 
(847)395-6860. 

SUZUKI ESTEEM 1995, 

$4.995. (847) 395-3600. 

TOYOTA 1990 CAMRY, 

dark red, 4-cyllnder, 5-speed 
stick, air conditioning, ster- 
eo/cassette, very good condi- 
tion. 106,000 miles. Asking 
$4,000. (647) 395-6784. 

TOYOTA 1992 CEUCA 

GT, $8,990. (847) 223-8651. 

TOYOTA 1696 PASEO, 
$9,495. (647) 362-2683. 



TRADE 1985 PONTIAC 
FIERp, .2.8 V6, automatic^ ' 
Trade fw. snowmobile, motor-' 
cycle;' 4-wfieeler or 7 (815) 
338-8925. ;' ; :- 

VW JETTA TREK LTD, 
1996, $13,995. (847). 362- 
2683. ■■■ ■•'■• •■-■. :- ;' 

HONDA 1996 EX COUPE, 
$10,095. (847) 223-8651. 

T6YOTA COROLLA 1993, 
$5,995: (847) _ 223-8851. . .' 

CHEVY 1991 CORSICA, 
$3,995. (847) 395-3900, 

CHEVY 1992 CORSICA, 

V8, A/T, A/C. Utt, cruise, cas- 
sette, good condition, 88K, 
$3.600, (847) 363-9910. 

CHEVY 1994 BERATTA 
$5.995 (647) 223-8651 

CHEVY 1994 CAVAUER, 
4-door, $4,950. (847) 244- 
1010. 

CHEVY 1995 CORSICA 
$5,990. (815) 363-2277. 

CHEVY 1995 CORSICA 
Power brakes, power steering, 
air, am/fm cassette, black will* 
light grey Interior, $8,7807flrm. 
(847) 740-1643 Monday-Frl- 
day. 4pm-8pm, 

FORD 1990 TAURUS GL, 
$3,995. (647) 395-3900. 

FORD 1990 THUNDER- 
BIRD, $4,495. (847) 395- 
3900. 

FORD 1991 TEMPO, 
$2995. Call (647) 587-6473 

FORD 1992 CROWN VIC- 
TORIA, $6,495. (B47) 360- 
5000, 

FORD 1993 ESCORT 
WAGON, $6,990. (815) 363- 
2277, 

FORD 1993 MUSTANG 
CONVERTIBLE. $7,495 (847) 
360-5000. 

FORD 1993 TAURUS GL 
WAGON, $4,995. (B47) 395- 
3900. 



FORD 1993 TAURUS GL. 
$3.995. (847) 395-3600. 

FORD 1994 ESCORT, 
$3,995. (847) 395-3900. 

FORD. 1996 MUSTANG 
; GT CONVERTIBLE with roll- 
bar, Laser Red, 8,500 miles. 
asking $18,750. (847) 
a58-1902 evenings. 

FORD 1999 CONTOUR 
LX, $13,290. (847) 336-2340. 



810 



Classic/Antique Can 



814 



'---' 



Serttt Spirts* 



834 



TradBrTrallm; 



PICKUP CAP, FITS 1690 

Ranger, 7ft. bed, locking slid- 
ing side windows with screens, 
pass . : through.-: :- 'window,'". 
fttSO/best, (647) 973-0321. 



1937 PLYMOUTH TOUR- 
ING SEDAN DELUXE, new 
paint and pencil pin stripping. 
All original. No rust or damage. 
Completely -rebuilt, excellent 
condlion, $15,000. (847) 
587-3193. 

GREAT WINTER PRO- 
JECT t929 Ford Bucket T 4 
sealer hot rod. Must see to ap- 
preciate. $3,000/best. (847) 
587-6444. 

OLDS 1994 CUTLASS 
CONVERTIBLE, $11,995. 
(847) 336-2340. 

OLDSMOBILE 1993 RE- 
GENCY, excellent condition, 
$7,900. (847) 546-5452 after 
3pm, ask for Sue. 

PLYMOUTH, 1993, COLT. 

$2482. Call (647) 587-6473. 

PONTIAC, 1996 GRAND 

Am, $10,995.00 (847) 395- 
3700 

PONTIAC 1988 FIRE- 
BIRD, $3,995. (647) 360- 
5000. 

PONTIAC 1991 SUNBtRD, 
$3,695. (847) 249-1300. 

PONTIAC 1993 GRAND 
PRIX SE, 2-door, $7,990. 
(847) 244-1010. 

PONTIAC 1993 SUNBIRD 
COUPE, white, excellent 
condition, low miles, well main- 
tained, many new parts, 
$6.000/best. (847) 26S-5602. 

PONTIAC 1994 GRAND 
AM GT, $6,970. (847) 244- 
1010. 

PONTIAC 1997 GRAND 

$11,990. (815) 363-2277. 

SKYLARK 1693 GRAND 
SPORT, 2-door. $7,995. (847) 
244-1010 

TAURUS GL 1997, 

$11,995. (647) 336-2340. 

TOYOTA 93 COROLLA. 
$5,995. (847)223-8651 



824 




CHEVROLET 1992 LUMI- 
NA' APVi $3,990. (847) 223- 
885L ; . : . v --■■•■ ..■-' '"■-'■■'■- . 

DODGE 1992 CARAVAN 
ES. $4.995. (647) 362-2663. 

FORD 1991 AERO STAB 
AWD VAN, $4,990. (847) 223- 
6651. 

FORD 1993 AEROSTAR 
WAGON, $6,995. (647) 587- 
3300, 

NEW 1998 GMC SAVANA 
CONVERSION VAN, $22,309, 
(847) 244-1010. 

NISSAN 1994 QUEST 
GXE, $8,995. (647) 223-8651. 

PLYMOUTH 1989 MINI 
VAN, 63K miles, $3,200/best. 
(414) 551-7994. 

PLYMOUTH 1998 VOYAG- 
ER, Knauz Price $18,499. 
(847) 234-2800. 

PONTIAC 1994 TRANS- 
PORT, Stock S7-6494T, 
471 587-6473 



FOHD 1999 BANGER XL, 

$10,395.(847) 336-2340, ; . ■, 

FORD . F^IM ;i W2, S^ylin- 1 ; 
der, stick, with air, AM/FM cas- 
sette, v low mileage,; 

$9,500/best (847) 356-5949, . 

ISUZfJ 'Q' : PICKUP: : 1691, ■: 

$4,995. (647) 382-2683,;" - . 

NEW 1998 GMC SONOMA - 
SL, $10.798. (647) 244-1010. u. j: 

NISSAN 1996 'PICKUP, 

Stock /"5-6399T. $6,627. (847) i 

587-6473. - V ' -.:^:.' \ 

WELLS CARGO TRAILER. 
18fL,.brand. new, swing downv 
ramp door, $5,000. - (847) 
223-6170. 



838 


Heavy Equipment 



IRRIGATION PUMP & MO- 
TOR, model 8203A, 40hp, 
phase 3. Peerless pump, 41a 
Ductal falanged. 20hp. motor. 
$650. (647) 740-7380 after 
5pm. 

STONE ELECTRIC CE- 
MENT MIXER, large, barely 
used, $1,500/best. (647) 

.839-0211 after 6pm. 




Four Wheel Drive 



BLAZER 1994, 4X4, 

$15,995. (647) 336-2340. 

CHEVROLET 1993 BLAZ- 
ER 4-door, red, 4WD, sharp, 
loaded, $12.500/best. (414) 
857-2605. 

CHEVY 1964 SHORTBED, 
4WD, 5L V8, 4-Bpeed manual 
overdrive. Great winter driver, 
$1,950. (847) 244-6827 ask 
for Steve. 

CHEVY 1985 BLAZER, V6, 
new tires, good runner, 
$1,600/besL (847) 265-7889 
after 7pm. 

CHEVY BLAZER 1992, 
$8,995. (847) 587-3300. 

GEO TRACKER 1994, 

$7,795. (847) 362-2683. 

ISUZU 1992 AMIGO, 
$6.995. (847) 623-7676. 

JEEP CHEROKEE 1988, 4- 
door, 4x4, $4,990. (647) 223- 
6651. 

JEEP WRANGLER 1997, 

$13,495. (847) 336-2340. 

LIKE NEW, 1996 GEO 
METRO LSI, 2-door hatch- 
back, 4-cyllnder, 6,000 miles, 
2yrs. old, all options, alarm, 
phone, $7,900/best. (847) 
548-7844. 

NEW 1998 GMC JIMMY 4x4 
Premier Edition, $22,553. 
(847)244-1010. 

NISSAN 1987 PATH- 
FINDER, $4,500/best. 1966 
Chevy Astro Van, engine re- 
built, $3,800. (847) 746-3572. 
pager (847) 633-0395. 

SUPER CLEAN 1095 Isuzu 
Rodeo 4x4, low miles, all the 
loys, tinted windows, sunroof, 
automatic, power windows 
and doors, cassette and CD. 
Must sacrifice. (847) 
823-^1307. 




Tmcks/Traiters 



1989 CHEVY S-10 with ex- 
tended cab, V6, automatic 
transmission, $3,200/best. 

(615)344-3624. 

1996 NISSAN, FIBER- 
GLASS top, excellent condi- 
tion, 5-speed, $7,500. (847) 
546-3930. 

CHEVY 1994 S-10 PICKUP 
4x4, $11,995. (847) 336-2340. 

CHEVY 1995 S-10 LS ex- 
tended cab pickup. 5-speed, 
airbag. A/C, power steer- 
ing/brakes, bedllner, cassette. 
Clean, excellent condition, 
$8,495. (847) 593-5747. 

DODGE 1986 RAM PICK- 
UP, short box, 4x4, V8, au- 
tomatic, $3,700. (414) 
763-6805. 

DODGE 1996 DAKOTA 
SPORT. Stock #7-6524T. 
$8,648. (647)587-6473. 

FORD 1984 VAN WORK 
TRUCK, heavy duty, 6-cy- 
llnder, very excellent runner, 
all new parts, $700/best. (847) 
395-6088. 

FORD 1687 F-150, 93.000 
miles on truck, 25,000 on new 
motor, Very good condition. 
$3,500/best. (414) 652-1116. 



844 




HARLEY DAVIDSON FX Ail 
custom, all chrome and pow- 
der coated. Motor and trans 
redone. $10,500/best (847) 
244-4273. 




THE HANDYMAN NO job 

too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rales and free estimates. 
fft471 223-7724. 




■ITS A DIRTY JOB' 

CLEANING SERVICE. 

And we're willing to do it. 

For all your cleaning needs. 

call us at (847) 546-7403. 

DOUBLE KK (CLEANING 
Reasonable rates. Depend- 
able. Free In-Home Quote. 
Call Kim (847) 546-3408, 

HOUSECLEANING. HON- 
EST AND reliable. Referenc- 
es. Call Nancy (647) 
526-1090. 

LET "ME" DO your house 
cleaning. Call Robin for details 
(847) 543-6772 you'll be glad 
you did). 

LET "ME" DO your house 
cleaning. Call Robin for details 
(847) 543-3772 you'll be glad 
you did). 

M-1 PROFESSIONAL 

CLEANING Commer- 

cial/Residential. Please call 
April at (847) 782-8417 
days/evenings. 

NO TIME FOR 
CLEANING? 

But need the job done right? 

Call Maria 

I clean weekly or 

bi-weekly only. 

Non-smoker. 

References. 

(847) 546-3759 

leave message. 




FALL CLEAN UP. Trimming, 
cutting down trees, blackdlrt, 
sod, mulch, planting. All your 
fall clean up work. (B15) 
385-5807. 



S72 



Professional 
Services 



WRITE FOR YOUI 

*X-Mas Cards 

'Wedding Invitations 

*Showar/Party Invitations. 

•Handwritten, 

* Reasonable rates. 

Call (616) 363-5330. 




S78 



Remodeling 



DC TILE WE Install floor and 
wall tiles of all kinds. Remodel 
all bathrooms and kitchens. 
Free estimates. (847) 395- 
Q777. 




STORAGE ROOM FOR 

200 boats and campers. Win- 
terizing while you wall Shrink 
wrap. Certified. (414) 

534-5256. 



-: 



' ■ '-:ir. l^'Ti ■>*-•' 



C28 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



November 6, 1998 




Banquet Halls 



Bonnie (Brook 
Clubhouse 

2800 N. Ix-vvis Ave, Wuukc«uii 

Banquets/or 

all occasions 

847/3604732 



Chapel 



Cupid's Chapel 

10 S. Genesee • Wimke#m 
Wedding & Honeymoon 

packages to 
suit your style & budget 

847/662-9115 



Beauty Salons | Limousine Services 




()ol[ j louse 
B((ittlij Salon 

m \\. < muiil Ave., Sutle I Hi • IjiJu' Villli 

Wedding Party 

Specialists 

847/356-83!)4 



Chicago Metropolitan 
Ihuousine Service. Inc. 

Luxurious, 
8 - passenger lima mines 

847/362-1401 



^f ( "'"■^J , . , 



I 

I 



.*! W*£J**S 



., mi */*r <.-/■■*. fMCv.v.ft »•*>*&-■?■ 



Bridal Registry Photographers 



CHILD CARE m my nomp 
t.ceilenl rtleipiif" fi 30ii«n 
t..r. 10pm 84 7 if. 1 ; own) 



Tar<rel Great land 

(muirlAvf. • (itiniec 1 

Has (ltd) Wedd. an automated gift •; 

registry loco ted a t the g| 
front of the more 

( at! tir i time tt> for morr injannulion 33 

847/2W49JKJ 

I 




Catering 



>//: 05t Ccittrmu 

Wk7l V SUtnn Nil. • lra>k".hli- 
I variety of bridal 



fHkkagesavadahk: 
IVV fUfi'/)( rt// m«jor iTCf/i/ ciznfe 

847/587-93(>2 



Picture Perfect 

WIS. I'mnKKi. :in».Mcllciin 

r%lliW Perfect— 

What wedding 

photography should be! 

815/344-9700 



Bentals 



Hbertijv ille f\ei Hz/111 

IK-S IVtiTM.ii Kil. • MherlYrllk* 

liivrvlhing for a party... 
except guests! 

847/362-76 10 



gff flUM 8 1Hflltfai C UWVKW^^ 



LOVING CHILD 
IN MY 



TTjfe CAHE 
(^ ^GRAVSLAKE 

-"^-^home Hai- <iine)i 

■■•I'rrtmus vaiks edu' JtniMji 
• v i .I'll "OK «l TLC nJyprr 
,.,[,.,r>fi f •• yv.1l ISJtu* li»«: HJ 
f ^f, r'l**,..-,!* c.vi l*M irvi'ty r '"* 
if, in in wt a>io 

84/5550000 



^f^ M c H c n f ' y ,' 
r^grb) Johnsburg mom 
3 ,%L of 2 wB watcn ycut 
^/\^J' child in my home 
fiir}. lenced tockya'd. large 
pl,iyrtxim no p#*IS non smok- 
.nq. ano plenty ol love 
Ay.i.iatue MondayFdday 6am 
•n fipri Bieaklasl lunch and 
snacks will be provided 
Please call Sue 
84)'-55S-OOO0 



CHILD CARE m your home Of 

mine Reference* available 

B47 £i5b 0000 



LICENSED DAYCARE in my 

home Encellenl references All 
ages are welcome Also mil 
waich your school aged child 
before and alter school 847- 
5550000 

NEWBORN TO 5 YEARS 
5 30am to 8 30pm 647-5S5- 
0000 

CHILD CARE IN YOUR HOME 
OR MY HOME. Let your 
children) spend their day 
learning, exploring and having 
lun Ceiiihed m CPR B47- 
555-0000 



Word Rate Ads 

15 words'$9.75 

150 for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

Ad with border 
and logo 

15 words $14.75 

15e for each 

additional word 

(pre-paid) 

PRIVATE PARTY 
ONLY 



r 

i 

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i 

i 

« 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

I 

\ 

i 

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L. 



Classified Order Blank 

Use ihc handy coupon below. Count words. 
Miiuk* lUJinbL-is and hyphenated words count as one word. Write copy below. 



I -lie lose check & mail to: Lakeland Publishers, 30 S. Whitney P.O. Box 268. 

(iruyslake. 1L 60030 or fax (847) 223-2691. To place an order by phone call 

Lisa ai (847) 223-8161 cxl. 140. Wc also accept Visa & MasterCard. 



"1 

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Lakeland Newspapers is your 




To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



To Place 
Your Ad Here 

Call 

847-223-8161 




ri l m finifrTTTiTirTTnyn^ "f"^" > r < 

HYPNOSIS BY 
DAVID 

The Holistic approach I 
to Good Health. I 

u 
Slop Smoking • Loso Wolghl 
Slop liratlonal loan - Manage stiosi ■ "- 
Focus your lllo a pott llto rogiosslon ; 

Also Spirit (oloosomonl ; 

FREE consullallon g 

Call Iho Conlor lor Habll Control ; 

« 

Dovld Wold moiior hypnollsl 

(847)816-4951 ; 

Now Llbortyvlllo Otdco ■ 



* 



* 
* 

4. 

* 
«■ 

* 
* 
* 



Punning, Wallpapering 

Expert Installation 
Paper • Fabric "Vinyl 




DECORATING 

• 'INSURED' 

(847) 395-8428 



* 
* 

* 
*■ 



*■ 

* 
* 

* 

* 
* 



4>-%J Pointing 



j^intetioi ft ; .i-'i; ■ Painimg 
a Or/wall Repairs 
^F'OpGf t<GrnOval 
J We Urjtmtsr, Ocuage Doois 



ijf Rotted Wood Replacemenl 
'jf Aluminum Siding Painting 
^Handvrrian Work 
ijf We Repoit Loose Aluminum Siding 



FREE ESTIMATE 

(847) 356-9282 
Jim Fay - Owner 

34 V»ori Ixp* rUnc» - Owner imolv*m«rrt on all jobs, btcauu w* 



/fUnlqut. Canty Heuqutix. ^^ 
fat all OuailoM *&£' 

id (ft 

}tUotti( a»i tht#ptn\ 
\aoaib*6U (847) 838-i 




Brothers' 
Roofing Company 

Ippoclallxlng In residential & commercial rooOntj, 
^^ deck repair & reflnlshlno. 

N^5^4> Lowest rales In the Midwest 
Call for FREE estimate 
847-5*6-1639 
Sc Habla EapaBol 
10% OFF with mention of this ad! 
Jully Insured • Senior Citizens' Discount 



Lower your ELECTRIC 8ILL wilh our ENERGY PERFORMANCE SERVICE 

HEATWAVE 

Healing m Air Conditioning 

k tJSS& ( 84? ) 740-4127 

'TVt*^ Fax (847) 546-0855 

We Service Ail Makes & Models 
Fully Licensed & Insured 
All Work Guaranteed 



i o\«owls fl 
CHiSW« 



(IB TEAfl* \ 

HiortmONu I 
imvice y 



COUPON 



<#► 



We accept All Ma|or 
Crodll Cardl 



^^^ 



vrsA 



PRE-SEASON SPECIAL 

PRECISION FURNACE 

TUNE-UP 

lOttLY $39.95 

WITH THIS COUPON 



I 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

ir you tiove placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another firm request' 
lug payment Tor tills advents 
Ing. To receive proper cred 
It la your account, oil pay> 
men is for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be mode as invoiced 
and directed to: 

lakeland Ncwspapera 

PO Box 268 

30 B. Whitney St. 

Oravalakc, IL 60030-0266 



FANTASTIC FIREWOOD 

2-Yt 4R OLD SIASOHEP HARDWOOD 

OAK, ASH, MAPLE, CHERRY $65 

100% OAK S75 (FC) 

(847) 546-3613 

(815) 344-9522 

1-300-430-62621 




A 



DECKS PLUS 

• CONSTRUCTION 
GENERAL CARPENTRY 
• Custom Decks 

•Porches • Room Additions 
•Basement Remodeling 
• Bathrooms - Kitchens 
•Custom Cnrpenlry 
• Improvements & Repairs! 
INSURED & BONDED 
rREE ESTIMATES 

(414) 889-6442 

Hcju* Cill Gary Kolkiu 





CONTR ACTORS ELECTRIC SERVICEJNC. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
'Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 
33265 N. Rte. 45 - 
Wlldwood, IL 60030 
(647) 223-4682 
RESIDENTIAL -COMMERCIAL .' 

1 





Lakeland Newsjmpw&p&i; 




6 MONTHS NO 
FINANCE CHARGE 

IF PAID IN 6 MONTHS WITH APPROVED CREDIT 
MINIMUM $300 PURCHASE 



SAME AS CASH 



FREE LAYAWAY • LOW PRICES • IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



You owe it to yourself, your home, and your budget to shop at Gumee Discount Furniture 



<-.-. .--._£, •-■ 



. .- • . 



Serving Lake County 45 yrs, 



PLENTY OF 
FREE PARKING 



Open 7 Days A Week 



\ m OPEN DAItf 

■ 10am-8pm 

■ SATURDAY 

■ 10am-6pm 

I SUNDAY 
I 1 1 am-4pm 

■ ■■■■■ I 





3535 WEST GRAND ON BT. 132 



Between 41 and Green Bay Road in Gurhee SALE ENDS NOV. 14, 1998 



847-623-5060 

GWI0AVt.ltt»y.13I} 






GURHEE DBCOUNTO f 
A FURNITURE jl 




I WO 



Se Habla Espanol, ,-':;- ^ 
Representante Hispano 
LosSahadosy ' ■ 
Domlngos : 



- 




—.'^v.w-.t-. .■„■'■ 



^.^ :**.^. ii ■ ' ■< ■ " » 



C32 I Lakeland Newspapers 



jj- 



11 



TT 



November 6, 1Q9B 



COUNTY 





ITS MORE THAN A 

www.regalcinemas.com 



I. mm i ir«rwmr»i«wa 
Uvtrl 



<1M - 1 ,.«pMn» 













• i , _ - ■•>' I 








On Rollins Road hetween Route B3 and Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake Beach, Illinois 























>creens • 3,900 Seats 












sewinghot drinks & bakedgoods with retractable upholder armrests 
Large Concession Stand • Customer Service Counter 
Credit Card Sales Accepted at Box Office 
DTS, SDDS & Dolby Digital Sound 
Equipped for the Hearing Impaired 
2 Day Advanced Ticket Sales 
Handicap Accessible 
Video Game Room 



\f. !t 



' \ 



jL^_^^fc^^^i j 







VISA MasterCard, American Express, Discover 



■ - ■- -■■ ■■■ ..j' : • '• p* ■ ij? 






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STADIU 




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